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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 91513 matches for " Brian W Christman "
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Low plasma citrulline levels are associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with severe sepsis
Lorraine B Ware, Jordan A Magarik, Nancy Wickersham, Gary Cunningham, Todd W Rice, Brian W Christman, Arthur P Wheeler, Gordon R Bernard, Marshall L Summar
Critical Care , 2013, DOI: 10.1186/cc11934
Abstract: Plasma citrulline, arginine and ornithine levels and nitrate/nitrite were measured at baseline in 135 patients with severe sepsis. ARDS was diagnosed by Consensus definitions.Plasma citrulline levels were below normal in all patients [median 9.2 uM, IQR 5.2 - 14.4)] and were significantly lower in ARDS compared to the no ARDS group [6.0 (3.3 - 10.4) vs. 10.1 (6.2 - 16.6), P= 0.002]. The rate of ARDS was 50% in the lowest citrulline quartile compared to 15% in the highest citrulline quartile (p = 0.002). In multivariable analyses, citrulline levels were associated with ARDS even after adjustment for covariates including severity of illness.In severe sepsis, levels of the NOS substrate citrulline are low and are associated with ARDS. Low NOS substrate levels have been shown in other disease states to lead to NOS uncoupling and oxidative injury suggesting a potential mechanism for the association between low citrulline and ARDS. Further studies are needed to determine whether citrulline supplementation could prevent the development of ARDS in patients with severe sepsis and to determine its role in NOS coupling and function.
Asymmetry in Resting Alpha Activity: Effects of Handedness  [PDF]
Ruth E. Propper, Jenna Pierce, Mark W. Geisler, Stephen D. Christman, Nathan Bellorado
Open Journal of Medical Psychology (OJMP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojmp.2012.14014
Abstract: Study Aim: Frontal electroencephalographic (EEG) alpha band power during rest shows increased right, and/or de-creased left, hemisphere activity under conditions of state or trait withdrawal-associated affect. Non-right-handers (NRH) are more likely to have mental illnesses and dispositions that involve such withdrawal-related affect. The aim of the study was to examine whether NRH might be characterized by increased right, relative to left, hemisphere activity during rest. Methods: The present research investigated that hypothesis by examining resting EEG alpha power in consistently-right-handed (CRH) and NRH individuals. Results: In support of the hypothesis, NRH demonstrated de-creased right hemisphere alpha power, and therefore increased right hemisphere activity, during rest, compared to CRH. Conclusions: The study demonstrates further support for an association between increased right hemisphere activity and negative affect via an association between such EEG activity and NRH.
Ten Questions You Should Pose to Your Organized Medicine Delegation
Christman, Kenneth
Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons , 2006,
Abstract:
Will Electronic Medical Records Doom Your Practice?
Christman, Kenneth
Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons , 2006,
Abstract:
Hospital Overcharging
Christman, Kenneth D
Journal of American Physicians and Surgeons , 2006,
Abstract:
Maximizing Revenues for Online-Dial-a-Ride
Ananya Christman,William Forcier
Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract: In the classic Dial-a-Ride Problem, a server travels in some metric space to serve requests for rides. Each request has a source, destination, and release time. We study a variation of this problem where each request also has a revenue that is earned if the request is satisfied. The goal is to serve requests within a time limit such that the total revenue is maximized. We first prove that the version of this problem where edges in the input graph have varying weights is NP-complete. We also prove that no algorithm can be competitive for this problem. We therefore consider the version where edges in the graph have unit weight and develop a 2-competitive algorithm for this problem.
Improving the Teaching of Statistics Online: A Multi-Faceted Approach
Brian W. Sloboda
Journal of Educators Online , 2005,
Abstract: Teaching an online statistics course poses significant challenges to the facilitator and the learners alike because of varying student preparedness levels, complexity of the course content, the difficulty in assessing learner outcomes, and determining the frequency of visibility of the facilitators in the online classroom. In this paper, the author suggests a teaching model that presents difficulties in the facilitation of an online statistics course and provides some remedies for overcoming these difficulties.
Reader's Advisory and Bibliotherapy:Helping or Healing?
Brian W. Sturm
Journal of Educational Media & Library Sciences , 2003,
Abstract: Reader s advisory, helping library patrons find books to read based on their prior reading preferences, is a common endeavor for most librarians. Bibliotherapy, using books to promote healing, is a special kind of reader s advisory. This article traces the origins of these two concepts and examines their underlying assumptions. It addresses the process through which stories may aid in healing and the process librarians should follow if they decide to engage in bibliotherapy. It concludes that librarians must know the difference between advising and counseling on both a professional and personal level and that they should be wary of letting the power inherent in the readers advisory role endanger their professionalism.
Evidence, Perceptions, and Trade-offs Associated with Invasive Alien Plant Control in the Table Mountain National Park, South Africa
Brian W. van Wilgen
Ecology and Society , 2012, DOI: 10.5751/es-04590-170223
Abstract: The Table Mountain National Park is a 265 km2 protected area embedded within a city of 3.5 million people. The park contains an extremely diverse flora with many endemic species, and has been granted World Heritage Site status in recognition of this unique biodiversity. Invasive alien plants are arguably the most significant threat to the conservation of this biodiversity, and the past decade has seen the implementation of aggressive programs aimed at the removal of invasions by these plants. These invasive alien plants include several species of trees, notably pines (Pinus species) and eucalypts (Eucalyptus species), which historically have been grown in plantations, and which are utilized for recreation by the city's residents. In addition, many citizens regard the trees as attractive and ecologically beneficial, and for these reasons the alien plant control programs have been controversial. I briefly outline the legal obligations to deal with invasive alien plants, the history of control operations and the scientific rationale for their implementation, and the concerns that have been raised about the operations. Evidence in support of control includes the aggressive invasive nature of many species, and the fact that they displace native biodiversity (often irreversibly) and have negative impacts on hydrology, fire intensity, and soil stability. Those against control cite aesthetic concerns, the value of pine plantations for recreation, the (perceived) unattractive nature of the treeless natural vegetation, and the (incorrect) belief that trees bring additional rainfall. The debate has been conducted through the press, and examples of perceptions and official responses are given. Despite opposition, the policy promoting alien plant removal has remained in place, and considerable progress has been made towards clearing pine plantations and invasive populations. This conservation success story owes much to political support, arising largely from job creation, and a strong body of scientific evidence that could be cited in support of the program.
Fires, science and society
Brian W. van Wilgen
South African Journal of Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/sajs.v106i5/6.279
Abstract:
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