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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 31 matches for " Brewing "
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Energy Targeting for a Brewing Process Using Pinch Analysis  [PDF]
Noah Tibasiima, Aldo Okullo
Energy and Power Engineering (EPE) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/epe.2017.91002
Abstract: The rising cost of energy and environmental concerns have led the brewing industry to search for techniques of reducing energy consumption in brewery operations. In this paper, pinch analysis was applied to a typical Ugandan based brewery process to target for the energy requirements of the process. Hint software was used for the analysis. At the chosen ΔTmin of 10, the minimum cooling and heating utility requirements of the brewery studied were determined as being 4862.21 kW and 8294.21 kW respectively, with a pinch temperature at 68. It was observed that using the technique, 1806.59 kW of energy could be recovered through process to process heat exchange which presented an energy saving potential of 21.5%. It is recommended that results from this study could be used in the design or retrofit of a heat exchanger network of a brewery for improved energy efficiency. Considerations can also be made for other values of ΔTmin.
Fundamentals of beer and hop chemistry
De Keukeleire, Denis;
Química Nova , 2000, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-40422000000100019
Abstract: beer brewing is an intricate process encompassing mixing and further elaboration of four essential raw materials, including barley malt, brewing water, hops and yeast. particularly hops determine to a great extent typical beer qualities such as bitter taste, hoppy flavour, and foam stability. conversely, hop-derived bitter acids account for an offending lightstruck flavour, which is formed on exposure of beer to light. these various processes are presented in detail, while due emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art hop technology, which provides brewers with efficient means to control bitterness, foam, and light-stability thereby allowing for the production of beers with consistent quality.
Fundamentals of beer and hop chemistry
De Keukeleire Denis
Química Nova , 2000,
Abstract: Beer brewing is an intricate process encompassing mixing and further elaboration of four essential raw materials, including barley malt, brewing water, hops and yeast. Particularly hops determine to a great extent typical beer qualities such as bitter taste, hoppy flavour, and foam stability. Conversely, hop-derived bitter acids account for an offending lightstruck flavour, which is formed on exposure of beer to light. These various processes are presented in detail, while due emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art hop technology, which provides brewers with efficient means to control bitterness, foam, and light-stability thereby allowing for the production of beers with consistent quality.
Effects of Spent Craft Brewers’ Yeast on Fermentation and Methane Production by Rumen Microorganisms  [PDF]
Virginia L. Pszczolkowski, Robert W. Bryant, Brittany E. Harlow, Glen E. Aiken, Langdon J. Martin, Michael D. Flythe
Advances in Microbiology (AiM) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/aim.2016.69070
Abstract: Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key component of beer brewing and a major by-product. The leftover, spent brewers’ yeast from large breweries has been used as a protein supplement in cattle; however the possible advantages of spent yeast from smaller craft breweries, containing much higher levels of bioactive hop acids, have not been evaluated. Hops secondary metabolites from the hops (Humulus lupulus L.) used to make beer are concentrated in the yeast during brewing, and have antimicrobial activity against Gram-positive bacteria. Uncultivated suspensions of bovine rumen microorganisms produced less methane during fructose fermentation when exposed to inactivated, and freeze-dried spent craft brewers’ yeast than a bakers’ yeast control. The experiment was repeated with caprine rumen microorganisms and ground grass hay as the substrate. Likewise, in the presence of craft brewers’ yeast less methane was produced (2.7% vs. 6.9% CH4). Both experiments also revealed a decrease in acetic acid production, but not propionic acid production, when craft brewers’ yeast was included. These results indicated that spent yeast could represent a co-product for craft breweries, and a feed supplement for ruminants that has a favorable impact on methane production.
Calidad de Maíz Colorado Flint para Industria Cervecera en Corrientes, Argentina
Balbi,Celsa N; Valentinuz,Oscar R; Prause,Juan;
Información tecnológica , 2010, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-07642010000300016
Abstract: this work was carried out with the aim of linking growth and quality variables of orange flint maize hybrids to use in brewing industry. the experiment was settled with five commercial maize hybrids in a randomised complete block design with four replications in random plots of 6 lines and 20 m long. the experiments were conducted without any limiting factor such as water and nutrients. the variables measured were dry matter content, area index, radiation interception, yield and quality, floating rate, test weight, and relation between milling and fat. yield obtained for the different hybrids were 771 and 982 g m-2 (p <0.0001). also, association between the relation source-posflowering destination and two quality variables, the flotation index and the weight test.
Aproveitamento da água de umidifica??o de malte da moagem úmida como matéria prima na fabrica??o de cerveja
VENTURINI FILHO, Waldemar G.;NOJIMOTO, T.;
Ciência e Tecnologia de Alimentos , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0101-20611999000200003
Abstract: the wet milling malt steep water can be used as raw material on brewing. however, some breweries discard this water containing a certain amount of extract. based on this fact, the aim of this work was to evaluate possible gain in mashing efficiency as well as changes in beer characteristics. pilsen beer was produced with and without malt steep water. the brewing raw materials were malt, hop, maltose syrup, distilled water and malt steep water. the wort was produced through infusion process, separated from spent grain through conventional filtration and then boiled for 60 minutes. after being cooled and clarified, it was inoculated with lager yeast (1,3g/l, dry matter basis). fermentation temperature was 10°c and the fermentative process was finished at 90% of the limit attenuation. the beer was bottled and then lagered at 0°c for 14 days. the results showed that mashing efficiency increase by malt steep water utilisation was statistically not significant. the use of steep water did not change chemical and sensorial characteristics of the beer; but there was a light increase in beer colour (7,1 x 8,0 ebc). the author concluded that malt steep water produced on industrial scale presents major extract concentration when compared to malt steep water produced on laboratory scale. in this way, the author suggested that industrial breweries which use wet milling should also use the malt steep water. thus, there is the possibility of gain in mashing efficiency without changes in beer characteristics.
Exploring the use of natural antimicrobial agents and pulsed electric fields to control spoilage bacteria during a beer production process
Galvagno,M. A.; Gil,G. R.; Iannone,L. J.; Cerrutti,P.;
Revista argentina de microbiolog?-a , 2007,
Abstract: different natural antimicrobials affected viability of bacterial contaminants isolated at critical steps during a beer production process. in the presence of 1 mg/ml chitosan and 0.3 mg/ml hops, the viability of escherichia coli in an all malt barley extract wort could be reduced to 0.7 and 0.1% respectively after 2 hour- incubation at 4 °c. the addition of 0.0002 mg/ml nisin, 0.1 mg/ml chitosan or 0.3 mg/ml hops, selectively inhibited growth of pediococcus sp. in more than 10,000 times with respect to brewing yeast in a mixed culture. in the presence of 0.1mg ml chitosan in beer, no viable cells of the thermoresistant strain bacillus megaterium were detected. nisin, chitosan and hops increased microbiological stability during storage of a local commercial beer inoculated with lactobacillus plantarum or pediococcus sp. isolated from wort. pulsed electric field (pef) (8 kv/cm, 3 pulses) application enhanced antibacterial activity of nisin and hops but not that of chitosan. the results herein obtained suggest that the use of these antimicrobial compounds in isolation or in combination with pef would be effective to control bacterial contamination during beer production and storage.
Oxalate Content of Different Drinkable Dilutions of Tea Infusions after Different Brewing Times
Neda Lotfi Yagin,Reza Mahdavi,Zeinab Nikniaz
Health Promotion Perspectives , 2012, DOI: 10.5681/hpp.2012.026
Abstract: Background: The aims of this study were to determine the effect of different brewing times and diluting on oxalate content of loose-packed black teas consumed in Tabriz, Iran.Methods: The oxalate content of black teas after brewing for 5, 10, 15, 30, 60 minutes was measured in triplicate by enzymatic assay. In order to attain the most acceptable dilution of tea infusions, tea samples which were brewed for 15, 30 and 60 minutes were diluted two (120 ml), three (80 ml) and four (60 ml) times respectively.Results: There was a stepwise increase in oxalate concentrations associated with increased brewing times (P< 0.001) with oxalate contents ranging from 4.4 mg/240 ml for the 5 min to 6.3 mg/240 ml for 60 min brewing times, respectively. There were significant differences between the mean oxalate content of different dilutions after brewing for 15, 30 and 60 minutes (P< 0.001).Conclusion: The oxalate content of Iranian consumed black tea after different brewing times and different dilution was below the recommended levels. Therefore, it seems that consumption of black tea several times per day would not pose significant health risk in kidney stone patients and susceptible individuals.
MALT BARLEY PRODUCTION ON THE CHESTNUT SOILS AREA OF VOLGOGRAD REGION Производство ячменя, пригодного для пивоварения в зоне каштановых почв Волгоградской области
Sinitsyna E. A.
Polythematic Online Scientific Journal of Kuban State Agrarian University , 2012,
Abstract: The article contains a short review of malt barley cultivation and its improvement ways on chestnut soils in Volgograd region. It includes the results of home brewing with the use of the experimental crop
Influence of Replacement of Concentrate by Beer By-product on Performance of Broilers in Central Vietnam
L.Q. Nguyen,T.Q. Vui,H.T. Hue,D.T. Hang
International Journal of Poultry Science , 2004,
Abstract: In an attempt to lower feed costs of small-holder broiler production in the area of Hue City, Central Vietnam, we replaced part of the commercial concentrate component of the diet by locally available wheat brewing by-product. There were three experimental diets containing either 5, 10 or 15% brewing by-product. The three diets were fed on five small-holder farms to groups of 20 broilers each. The results show that beer by-product enhanced growth and improved feed efficiency. Slaughter carcass traits and the weights of breast and drumstick were enhanced by the feeding of beer by-product. The inclusion of 10% beer by-product in the diet increased the antibody titre against Newcastle disease when the birds were aged 9 weeks, but not when they were aged either 4 or 12 weeks. It is concluded that substitution of brewers` wheat for part of the concentrate component can render broiler diets less expense and more efficient.
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