oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 2269 matches for " Bodil Margrethe Nielsen "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /2269
Display every page Item
Physical Health Examinations in a Psychiatric Setting: The Interactions between Medical Doctor and Patients  [PDF]
Anne Mette Juul Andersen, Henriette Laugesen, Bodil Margrethe Nielsen, Tine Mechlenborg Kristiansen
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2018.81005
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to shed light on the possible stigmatization during a physical health examination in a psychiatric setting and explore the medical doctor and patients’ perceptions of such an integrated care model. This is a qualitative case study using semi-structured interviews and observations. Empirical findings are analyzed using the theory of stigma in order to explore the role of stigmatization in an integrated care setting. The analysis finds three main themes: 1) The advantages of a safe and familiar setting, 2) To be treated as a human being—not an illness, 3) Interpersonal communication with mutual understanding can reduce stigmatization. The results show that stigmatization does occur at some points. However, both patients and the medical doctor think that the integrated care setting contributes to a successful physical health examination. This is due to the location as well as interpersonal aspects.
Does pulmonary rehabilitation work in clinical practice? A review on selection and dropout in randomized controlled trials on pulmonary rehabilitation
Bodil Bjoernshave, Jens Korsgaard, Claus Vinther Nielsen
Clinical Epidemiology , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S9483
Abstract: es pulmonary rehabilitation work in clinical practice? A review on selection and dropout in randomized controlled trials on pulmonary rehabilitation Review (4008) Total Article Views Authors: Bodil Bjoernshave, Jens Korsgaard, Claus Vinther Nielsen Published Date April 2010 Volume 2010:2 Pages 73 - 83 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CLEP.S9483 Bodil Bjoernshave1, Jens Korsgaard2, Claus Vinther Nielsen3 1Medical Department, Horsens Regional Hospital, Denmark; 2Aalborg Hospital Science and Innovation Centre, 3Department of Clinical Social Medicine and Rehabilitation, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, Denmark Aim: To analyze randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to determine whether the patients who complete PR form a representative subset of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) target population and to discuss what impact this may have for the generalizability and implementation of PR in practice. Material and methods: A review of 26 RCTs included in a Cochrane Review 2007. We analyzed the selection at three different levels: 1) sampling; 2) inclusion and exclusion; 3) and dropout. Results: Of 26 studies only 3 (12%) described the sampling as the number of patients contacted. In these studies 28% completed PR. In all we found, that 75% of the patients suitable for PR programs were omitted due to sampling exclusion and dropout. Most of the study populations are not representative of the target population. Conclusion: The RCTs selected for the Cochrane review gave sparse information about the sampling procedure. The demand for high internal validity in studies on PR reduced their external validity. The patients completing PR programs in RCTs were not drawn from a representative subset of the target population. The ability to draw conclusions relevant to clinical practice from the results of the RCTs on PR is impaired.
Does pulmonary rehabilitation work in clinical practice? A review on selection and dropout in randomized controlled trials on pulmonary rehabilitation
Bodil Bjoernshave,Jens Korsgaard,Claus Vinther Nielsen
Clinical Epidemiology , 2010,
Abstract: Bodil Bjoernshave1, Jens Korsgaard2, Claus Vinther Nielsen31Medical Department, Horsens Regional Hospital, Denmark; 2Aalborg Hospital Science and Innovation Centre, 3Department of Clinical Social Medicine and Rehabilitation, Institute of Public Health, Aarhus University, DenmarkAim: To analyze randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) to determine whether the patients who complete PR form a representative subset of the chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) target population and to discuss what impact this may have for the generalizability and implementation of PR in practice.Material and methods: A review of 26 RCTs included in a Cochrane Review 2007. We analyzed the selection at three different levels: 1) sampling; 2) inclusion and exclusion; 3) and dropout. Results: Of 26 studies only 3 (12%) described the sampling as the number of patients contacted. In these studies 28% completed PR. In all we found, that 75% of the patients suitable for PR programs were omitted due to sampling exclusion and dropout. Most of the study populations are not representative of the target population.Conclusion: The RCTs selected for the Cochrane review gave sparse information about the sampling procedure. The demand for high internal validity in studies on PR reduced their external validity. The patients completing PR programs in RCTs were not drawn from a representative subset of the target population. The ability to draw conclusions relevant to clinical practice from the results of the RCTs on PR is impaired.Keywords: COPD, rehabilitation, selection, dropout, external validity
INTERVIEW: Quick, Social and Collaborative - wiki-based user documentation at APC by Schneider Electric
Margrethe H. M?ller,Pernille Bagger Nielsen,Stanislav Kalianov
Communication & Language at Work , 2013,
Abstract: In the software documentation department at APC by Schneider Electric in Kolding, Denmark, Technical Writer Pernille Bagger Nielsen writes user documentation for the software developed by the company. In cooperation with Localization Manager Stanislav Kalianov she reorganised the user documentation for publication as wiki-based documentation on the internet. The new platform supports their strategy of using agile and iterative, topic-based, collaborative writing when developing user documentation. Their experience will interest readers who consider introducing a similar new strategy.
A study of duration of digital dermatitis lesions after treatment in a Danish dairy herd
Bodil H Nielsen, Peter T Thomsen, Jan T S?rensen
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1751-0147-51-27
Abstract: Digital dermatitis (DD) is a contagious disease of cattle affecting the skin of the distal extremities. The inflammation causes varying degrees of irritation and pain and may cause severe lameness [1]. The transition between different stages of DD based on lesion development have been described [2-4] and in one study, the duration of a single case of DD has been reported to be approximately 70 days [5]. Somers et al. [4] reported that ulcerative lesions may persist for several months. An estimate of the duration of lesions would be a valuable parameter in the evaluation of the economic impact of the disease. Additionally, knowledge about the duration of lesions is of value in allowing estimates of incidences from prevalence data.The aim of this study was to estimate the duration of lesions due to DD and to evaluate parity and lactation stage as risk factors for longer duration of such lesions. The hypotheses were that lesions in primiparous cows have a longer duration than in multiparous cows and that the duration of lesions occurring early in the lactation is longer than the duration of lesions with a later onset.In the period from May 2007 until November 2008, DD associated lesions in hind legs of Danish Holstein (DH) cows (N = 151) at the Danish Cattle Research Centre, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Denmark, were clinically scored on 15 occasions with approximately five week intervals. The dairy herd was housed in a loose housing system with cubicles and slatted floor in the alleys as well as behind the feeding rack. At each recording all lactating and non-lactating cows were observed. Information about the individual animal (parity and days in milk (DIM)) was obtained from the herd database. Clinical examinations were performed by an experienced veterinarian or a trained technician. All examinations were done in a chute and the hind hooves were either fully trimmed or, where this was unnecessary, washed with water for recording. The lesions were recorded usin
Characterization of Pectin Nanocoatings at Polystyrene and Titanium Surfaces  [PDF]
Katarzyna Gurzawska, Kai Dirscherl, Yu Yihua, Inge Byg, Bodil J?rgensen, Rikke Svava, Martin W. Nielsen, Niklas R. J?rgensen, Klaus Gotfredsen
Journal of Surface Engineered Materials and Advanced Technology (JSEMAT) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/jsemat.2013.34A1003
Abstract:

The titanium implant surface plays a crucial role for implant incorporation into bone. A new strategy to improve implant integration in a bone is to develop surface nanocoatings with plant-derived polysaccharides able to increase adhesion of bone cells to the implant surface. The aim of the present study was to physically characterize and compare polystyrene and titanium surfaces nanocoated with different Rhamnogalacturonan-Is (RG-I) and to visualize RG-I nanocoatings. RG-Is from potato and apple were coated on aminated surfaces of polystyrene, titianium discs and titanium implants. To characterize, compare and visualize the surface nanocoatings measurements of contact angle measurements and surface roughness with atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and confocal microscopy was performed. We found that, both unmodified and enzymatic modified RG-Is influenced surface wettability, without any major effect on surface roughness (Sa, Sdr). Furthermore, we demonstrated that it is possible to visualize the pectin RG-Is molecules and even the nanocoatings on titanium surfaces, which have not been presented

Association between antibodies to Coxiella burnetii in bulk tank milk and perinatal mortality of Danish dairy calves
Katrine T Nielsen, S?ren S Nielsen, Jens F Agger, Anna-Bodil Christoffersen, J?rgen S Agerholm
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1751-0147-53-64
Abstract: Twenty-four Danish dairy herds were tested repeatedly for antibodies to C. burnetii in BTM using a commercial ELISA. Samples were collected monthly from July 2008 to July 2009. Information on the 2,362 calvings occurring in the study period was obtained from the Danish Cattle Database. Two multilevel logistic regression models were created for the two outcomes stillbirth and perinatal mortality. One model included the level of BTM antibodies in a specified period before or after the outcome had occurred. The other model included the change in antibodies over time. These predictors were included both at herd and animal level. Furthermore, all models included parity and breed.The individual monthly BTM antibody levels were highly correlated within herds. Consequently, changes in BTM antibody levels were not found to be associated with neither risk of stillbirth nor the risk of perinatal mortality. However, the risk of stillborn calves and perinatal death was higher with high level of BTM antibodies 8 to 9 months after the incident, but not outside this period.We conclude that the level of antibodies to C. burnetii in BTM may be associated with perinatal mortality, but the association was not persistent and should be investigated further.Coxiella burnetii is a cause of sporadic abortion in cattle [1,2]. The infection occurs almost world-wide and recent studies of bulk tank milk (BTM) antibodies in some European countries have shown between-herd prevalences ranging from 38 to 79% in cattle [3-5]. C. burnetii has been detected in the vagina of cattle [6], and recently infection with C. burnetii without associated placental pathology was reported [7]. C. burnetii associated abortions in ruminants are characterized by extensive necrotizing placentitis [2]. However, there is no reason to believe that C. burnetii associated placentitis differs from other bacterial infections of the pregnant uterus, where foetuses with the most severe infection are aborted or delivered premat
Prevalence of Coxiella burnetii antibodies in Danish dairy herds
Jens F Agger, Anna-Bodil Christoffersen, Erik Rattenborg, J?rgen Nielsen, J?rgen S Agerholm
Acta Veterinaria Scandinavica , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1751-0147-52-5
Abstract: The bacterium Coxiella burnetii is a zoonotic agent and infection may cause Q fever in man and in animal species. The bacterium has been detected in a large number of animal species and with cattle, sheep and goats as being the most common reservoirs [1]. C. burnetii antibodies have been detected within cattle, sheep and goat herds in many countries of the world. Thus, selected publications that are valued as giving reliable estimates of the respective target populations reported a prevalence of antibody positive herds at 67% of Ontario dairy herds [2], 28% of Ontario sheep flocks [3], 21% of dairy herds in England and Wales [4], and more than 50% of Dutch dairy herds [5]. The prevalence of PCR positive herds was 40% of northern Italian dairy herds [6], and 22% of Basque dairy sheep herds [7].Until recently, C. burnetii was considered to occur with a low prevalence in Denmark. However, testing for antibodies in cattle since 2003 indicated that the infection was widespread in cattle [8], and a recent study [9] found that 57% of 742 non-randomly selected bulk tank milk samples from Danish dairy herds were antibody positive.The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and geographical distribution of C. burnetii antibody positive randomly selected dairy herds in Denmark.The survey was designed as a cross sectional study of a sample of 100 randomly selected dairy herds. As there was no prior knowledge about the herd infection frequency at the time of planning the study, the necessary sample size was based on an assumed prevalence of p = 0.50 and with an allowable error on the estimate of l = 0.10 at the 95% confidence level. Using the formula n = Z2pq/l2 resulted in an estimated need of 96 herds. Each of the 4785 milk producing dairy herds in Denmark by 1 February 2008 was assigned a random number between 0 and 1 (SAS function Ranuni (0)) [10], and the 150 herds with the lowest numbers were chosen for the study. The only inclusion criterion was that the
Doing Care with Integrity and Emotional Sensibility—Reciprocal Encounters in Psychiatric Community Care of Older People with Mental Health Problems  [PDF]
Lis Bodil Karlsson, Elisabeth Rydwik
Sociology Mind (SM) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/sm.2013.32025
Abstract:

The article focuses on the experiences of community care workers in the encounter with older persons suffering from mental health problems, such as mental illness and disability. The purpose is to describe and discuss opportunities for and challenges to reciprocal encounters with these older people in community care, based on statements from professionals interviewed. Structured conversations with five focus groups were organised, consisting of 26 participants, including nurses’ assistants, assistant nurses, nurses, social workers and occupational therapists. The participants in the focus groups highlight the essence of being involved and create space for a reflective attitude. Clinical implications will be presented as well.

A case report on a patient suffering from recurrent vomiting episodes, whose condition improved markedly during pregnancy and breast feeding
Bodil Ohlsson
BMC Gastroenterology , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-230x-6-28
Abstract: A woman with recurrent vomiting episodes over several years was examined by esophagogastroduodenoscopy. This showed a non-peristaltic ventricle. Treatment with the procinetic drug cisapride (Prepulsid?) improved the peristalsis and reduced the symptoms. During pregnancy and breast feeding, she was free of symptoms, in spite of having discontinued her medication with cisapride (Prepulsid?).The fact that the patient improved during pregnancy and breast feeding, would seem to indicate the involvement of factors in the physiology of pregnancy and breast feeding that are of importance for gastric motility. This deserves further investigation.The normal motor function of the gut is controlled by the sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system in addition to the enteric nervous system, interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) and smooth muscle cells. Severe gastrointestinal dysmotility, including gastroparesis, can develop as a result of the abnormal function of any of these systems including their associated neurotransmitters [1]. The pathogenesis may be immune-mediated, as in post-infectious gastroparesis [2], or may be due to defects in the ICCs, autonomic nervous system and smooth muscle, as in diabetic gastroparesis [3]. One third of all cases of gastroparesis are still regarded as idiopathic [4]. Several hormones and neurotransmitters have been suggested to be involved in this condition [5]. In clinical practice, I have noticed that some patients with severe gastrointestinal motility problems have improved during pregnancy and breast feeding.In the following, I describe a woman with recurrent vomiting and reduced gastric motility, who was completely free of problems during pregnancy and breast feeding. A hypothesis could be raised on this finding, namely, that peptides and/or neurotransmitters appearing in altered concentrations during these conditions are involved in the physiology and pathophysiology of the gastrointestinal tract.A previously healthy woman, born in 19
Page 1 /2269
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.