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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 11 matches for " BSN "
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MAL De Meleda Type Of Keratoderma
Pandhi Deepika,Reddy BSN
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2001,
Abstract: A child born of a consanguineous marriage showing characteristic features of Mal de Meleda type of palmoplantar keratoderma is reported for its rarity and clinical interest.
Familial hypercholesterolemia with multiple cutaneous xanthomas
Reddy BSN,Chaudhuri S
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2006,
Abstract: An interesting episode of homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia affecting four children born to a consanguinous parents belonging to two different families is reported for its rarity. The patients had multiple cutaneous xanthomas including the characteristic xanthoma tendinosum, xanthoma interosseum, xanthoma tuberosum, and xanthelasma palpebrarum. Prominent corneal arcus juvenalis has been noted in three children. Gross elevation of serum levels of low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLc) with normal values of triglycerides have been found in all patients. They have been prescribed medication with oral tablets of simvastatin and advised fat restricted diet and regular follow up in the clinic at periodic intervals.
The Efficacy Of A New Moisturizer In Xerotic Skin Disorders
Pandhi Deepika,Reddy BSN
Indian Journal of Dermatology , 2001,
Abstract: Xerosis is a common complaint in patients attending Dermatology clinics. Twenty patients with xerosis, irrespective of cause were enrolled in the study, treated with urea free lotion Dewderm (R) as the only form of therapy and the response was noted. In 13 (65%) patients good results were obtained, specially in senile xerosis, idiopathic xerosis and asteatotic eczema. It is quite safe and may be advocated as first line of therapy in xerotic skin disorders. Further it can miniize the excessive use of topical steroids specially in wide spread disease
Evaluation of relative potencies of topical corticosteroids with histamine pin-prick method
Reddy BSN,Shantharaman R
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1993,
Abstract: Relative potencies of different topical steroids in two serial concentrations were evaluated over the flexor aspect of human forearm in 50 volunteers. The results indicated that the order of potency for different steroid solutions ranged from the lowest with hydrocortisone acetate to the highest with betamethasone dipropionate while other steroids occupied intermediate positions. Further, it was noted that the potency of steroids is enhanced significantly by increasing their concentration.
Comparative evaluation of topical corticosteroid creams
Reddy BSN,Shantharaman R
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1992,
Abstract: It is important to have reliable bioassay models for topical steroids and assess their comparative efficacy. In the present study, seven commonly prescribed commercial corticosteroid creams have been evaluated for their efficacy using histamine bioassay method. The results indicated that clobetasol propionate (Excel ) and betamethasone valerate (Betnovate ), fluocinolone acetonide (Supricort ), beclomethasone dipropionate (Beclate ), betamethasone benzoate (Topicasone ), and dexamethasone trimethyl acetate (Millicortenol ) in that order of priority.
Pyrexial therapy in subcutaneous phycomycosis
Reddy BSN,Sourianarayanane A,Garg B,Ratnakar C
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1992,
Abstract: A case of subcutaneous phycomycosis occurring in a 2 year old child is reported for its rarity, clinical interest and paucity of literature. The condition failed to resolve with conventional antimycotics but improved with the administration of concomitant pyrexial therapy.
Clinico-mycological study of tinea capitis in Pondicherry
Reddy BSN,Swaminathan G,Kanungo Reba,D′Souza Mariette
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1991,
Abstract: A clinico-mycological analysis of 68 consecutive clinically diagnosed tinea capitis patients confirmed that the disease affects more commonly prepubertal children of either sex. Salient clinical features in order of frequency included patchy hair loss, scaly patches, black dots and inflammatory lesions with erythema, vesiculation and boggy swelling. Scaly type (36.9%) was the most commonly encountered clinical pattern followed by black dot (33.8%) and kerion (29.3%). Direct microscopic examination of the affected hair with 20% KOH revealed evidence of fungus in all patients with endothrix (58.8%) being the common pattern noted. The rate of culture positivity of the aetiologic fungus grown on Sabouraud′s dextrose agar medium was 82.3%. T. violaceum (66.2%) was the most frequently isolated fungus accounting for both inflammatory as well as non-inflammatory lesions.
Linear porokeratosis of mibelli
Shenoy M,Sri Venkateswaran K,Reddy BSN,Garg B
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 1993,
Abstract: An unusual case of linear porokeratosis manifesting unilaterally in a 25 year old male patient is reported for rarity and clinical interest.
A Field-based Approach to Support Improved Diabetes Care in Rural States
Elizabeth A. Johnson, BSN, APRN,Wanda L. Webb, RN, MHA,Janet M. McDowall, RN, BSN,Linda L. Chasson, MSA
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2005,
Abstract: Introduction Diabetes care is a challenge in rural areas where primary care practices are faced with limited resources, few clinical information systems, and relative isolation from education programs and diabetes centers with multispecialty teams. This report describes an effective field-based approach to support improved care for patients with diabetes in primary care practices in rural states. Methods A collaborative effort between diabetes prevention and control programs in Montana and Wyoming and the University of North Dakota was established to provide support to rural primary care practices for improvement in diabetes care. Field teams from each state diabetes program approached primary care practices. After assessment and orientation of office staff, a computer-based registry was established in each practice. Baseline data were collected in 1997 in Montana and in 1998 in Wyoming; follow-up occurred on July 31, 2004. Health department staff provided ongoing technical support for implementing and evaluating quality-improvement interventions. Results Forty primary care practices, providing care to more than 7000 patients with diabetes, participated in this quality-improvement effort at follow-up. Of the 37 primary care practices participating in the quality-improvement program for 6 or more months at follow-up, there were significant improvements in Montana in rates of hemoglobin A1c testing, blood glucose control, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol testing, foot and dilated retinal examinations, and pneumococcal vaccinations, and there were significant improvements in pneumococcal vaccinations in Wyoming. Conclusion A field-based approach in which individual practices maintain and use their own registries for both clinical care and quality improvement with ongoing support is a sustainable and an effective strategy for improving diabetes care for rural populations.
Utah s Family High Risk Program: Bridging the Gap Between Genomics and Public Health
Jenny Johnson, CHES,Rebecca T. Giles, MPH, CHES,LaDene Larsen, RN, BSN,Joan Ware, MSPH, RN
Preventing Chronic Disease , 2005,
Abstract: Background Family history is a simple yet powerful genomic tool that can identify individuals and entire populations at risk for diseases such as heart disease, cancer, and diabetes. Despite its use for predicting disease, family history has traditionally been underused in the public health setting. Context A program for identifying families at risk for a variety of chronic diseases was implemented in Utah. Utah has population characteristics that are unique among the United States. Although the land area is large, most residents live within a relatively small geographic area. The religion of 70% of the residents encourages the recording of detailed family histories, and many families have access to records dating back to the 1800s. Methods From 1983 through 1999, the Utah Department of Health, local health departments, school districts, the University of Utah, and the Baylor College of Medicine implemented and conducted the Family High Risk Program, which identified families at risk for chronic diseases using the Health Family Tree Questionnaire in Utah high schools. Consequences The collection of family history is a cost-effective method for identifying and intervening with high-risk populations. More than 80% of eligible families consented to fully participate in the program. A total of 80,611 usable trees were collected. Of the 151,188 Utah families who participated, 8546 families identified as high-risk for disease(s) were offered follow-up interventions. Interpretation The program was revolutionary in design and demonstrated that family history can bridge the gap between genetic advances and public health practice.
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