oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 171 )

2018 ( 242 )

2017 ( 242 )

2016 ( 351 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 144334 matches for " B Sakyi "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /144334
Display every page Item
RETRACTED: Groundwater evolution in the Voltaian Basin, Ghana—an application of multivariate statistical analysesto hydrochemical data  [PDF]
Sandow Mark Yidana, Gerard B. Yiran, Patrick Asamoah Sakyi, Prosper M. Nude, Bruce Banoeng-Yakubo
Natural Science (NS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ns.2011.310109
Abstract:

Short Retraction Notice

This article has been retracted to straighten the academic record. In making this decision the Editorial Board follows COPE's Retraction Guidelines. Aim is to promote the circulation of scientific research by offering an ideal research publication platform with due consideration of internationally accepted standards on publication ethics. The Editorial Board would like to extend its sincere apologies for any inconvenience this retraction may have caused.

The full retraction notice in PDF is preceding the original paper, which is marked \"RETRACTED\".

Relationship between caregivers’ income generation activities and their children’s animal source food intake
AK Christian, A Lartey, EK Colecraft, GS Marquis, O Sakyi-Dawson, B Ahunu, LM Butler
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development , 2012,
Abstract: Enhancing Child Nutrition through Animal Source Food Management (ENAM) project provided financial and technical support for caregivers’ Income Generation Activities (IGA) with the aim of increasing their access to Animal Source Foods (ASF) for improved child nutrition. Using baseline data from the ENAM project, this study assessed the relationship between the type of caregivers’ IGA -whether it is related to ASF [ASF-R] or unrelated [ASF-U] - and the quantity and diversity of ASF consumed by their children. Structured questionnaire was used to obtain data on household socioeconomic and demographic characteristics and children’s ASF consumption in the past week from 530 caregivers of children 2-to5 years old in 12 communities in three agro-ecological zones of Ghana. A weighed food record of children’s dietary intakes was also completed during two 12-hour home observations on a randomly selected sample of 117 children. Approximately 6% (n=32) of caregivers were not engaged in any IGA. Of the caregivers who were involved in an IGA (n=498), approximately one-third of them were engaged in an ASF-R IGA, such as selling smoked fish, selling eggs and the selling cooked food that included ASF. Caregivers (67%) were engaged in ASF-U IGA, such as crop farming, petty trading in non ASF items and artisanal work. The quantity and diversity of ASF consumed by the children did not differ (p=0.988 and p=0.593, respectively) by the type of caregiver IGA. However, after accounting for agro-ecological zone, being involved in an ASF-R IGA positively predicted children’s ASF diversity (p<0.001). The number of children in the household negatively predicted children’s ASF diversity (p=0.011) whereas high/medium household wealth status tended to be positively associated with ASF diversity (p=0.064).The study suggested that there is need to promote ASF-R IGA among caregivers to increase the ability to purchase more varied and nutritious food items for improving children’s growth.
HTLV-1 and other viral sexually transmitted infections in antenatal and gynaecological patients in Ghana
KA Apea-Kubi, S Yamaguchi, B Sakyi, D Ofori-Adjei
West African Journal of Medicine , 2006,
Abstract:
Bacterial contamination of street vending food in Kumasi, Ghana
P Feglo, K Sakyi
Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Street vending foods are readily available sources of meals for many people but the biological safe-ty of such food is always in doubt. The aim of this study is to ascertain bacterial isolate and deter-mine total counts of bacterial species responsible for the contamination of the street vending food in Kumasi so as to determine the microbiological safety of such a food. This prospective study was conducted among street vending food at four bus terminals in Kumasi. From November, 2008 to February, 2009, 60 food samples comprising ice-kenkey (15), cocoa drink (15), fufu (5), ready-to-eat red pepper (normally eaten with kenkey) (5), salad (10) and macaroni (10) were purchased and ana-lyzed. The food samples were purchased and transported to the laboratory in sterile plastic bags and analyzed for bacterial contamination. Serial dilution of each food was prepared in buffered peptone water and inoculated onto plate count agar (PCA), MacConkey and blood agar plates. Growths on PCA were counted; those on other agar plates were identified by their colonial mor-phology, Gram stain, biochemical and sugar fermentation methods. The mean bacterial counts in these foods expressed to log10 CFU/ml were: fufu 6.36±0.47, cocoa drink 6.16±0.5, red pepper 5.92±0.64, ice-kenkey 5.58 ±0.52, macaroni 5.58±0.97 and salad 5.13±0.77. Most of these foods con-tained higher than acceptable contamination level of <5.0 log10 CFU/ml. The isolates obtained were Coagulate negative staphylococci (23.7%), Bacillus species (21.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18%), Aeromonas pneumophila (17.7%), Enterobacter cloacae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.7%), Escherichia coli (2.2%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.2%). Most ready-to-eat foods in Kumasi were contaminated with enteric bacteria and other potential food poisoning organisms with bacterial counts higher than the acceptable levels. Food vendors therefore need education on food hygiene. Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences (2012) 1(1), 1-8
Bacterial contamination of street vending food in Kumasi, Ghana
Feglo, P.,Sakyi, K.
Journal of Medical and Biomedical Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Street vending foods are readily available sources of meals for many people but the biological safe-ty of such food is always in doubt. The aim of this study is to ascertain bacterial isolate and deter-mine total counts of bacterial species responsible for the contamination of the street vending food in Kumasi so as to determine the microbiological safety of such a food. This prospective study was conducted among street vending food at four bus terminals in Kumasi. From November, 2008 to February, 2009, 60 food samples comprising ice-kenkey (15), cocoa drink (15), fufu (5), ready-to-eat red pepper (normally eaten with kenkey) (5), salad (10) and macaroni (10) were purchased and ana-lyzed. The food samples were purchased and transported to the laboratory in sterile plastic bags and analyzed for bacterial contamination. Serial dilution of each food was prepared in buffered peptone water and inoculated onto plate count agar (PCA), MacConkey and blood agar plates. Growths on PCA were counted; those on other agar plates were identified by their colonial mor-phology, Gram stain, biochemical and sugar fermentation methods. The mean bacterial counts in these foods expressed to log10 CFU/ml were: fufu 6.36±0.47, cocoa drink 6.16±0.5, red pepper 5.92±0.64, ice-kenkey 5.58 ±0.52, macaroni 5.58±0.97 and salad 5.13±0.77. Most of these foods con-tained higher than acceptable contamination level of <5.0 log10 CFU/ml. The isolates obtained were Coagulate negative staphylococci (23.7%), Bacillus species (21.5%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18%), Aeromonas pneumophila (17.7%), Enterobacter cloacae (6.7%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.7%), Escherichia coli (2.2%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (2.2%). Most ready-to-eat foods in Kumasi were contaminated with enteric bacteria and other potential food poisoning organisms with bacterial counts higher than the acceptable levels. Food vendors therefore need education on food hygiene.
Determination of Heavy Metals Concentration in Hair Pomades on the Ghanaian Market Using Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Technique
E.O. Amartey,A.B. Asumadu-Sakyi,C.A. Adjei,F.K. Quashie
British Journal of Pharmacology and Toxicology , 2011,
Abstract: Forty eight (48) hair pomade samples collected from female students at the University of Ghana campus were analysed for heavy metal content using atomic absorption spectrometry technique. The concentrations were compared with available data on internationally acceptable maximum limits for these elements and their possible health implications on the consumering public. Eleven (11) heavy metals were considered including Ca, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn, Ni and Zn (essential mineral nutrients) as well as Cd and Pb (toxic elements). All the samples recorded significant levels for most of the elements of interest except Cr concentrations which were below detection (<0.001 mg/kg) for each of the samples analysed. The mean and standard deviation concentrations for the elements in mg/kg are as follows: Ca (421.055±180.203), Co (16.036±5.479), Cu (3.758±2.270), Fe (209.866±67.531), Mg (19.830±24.310), Mn (9.800±2.423) and Zn (17.547±18.876), Cd (5.697±0.967), Ni (11.274±10.502) and Pb (8.269±4.864). Significantly some of the essential trace elements such as Co, Fe, Mn and Ni in the samples were quite high and exceeded reference levels in hair of healthy individuals from different countries, while the remaining elements were within the range. Also the Cd and Pb content of the samples were above the permissible limits for heavy metals in cosmetic products. There is therefore the need for immediate and regular mandatory testing of imported and local cosmetic products specifically hair pomades into the Ghanaian market by the appropriate regulatory authority to prevent the associated health risk and ensure consumer safety.
Analysis of the Suitability of Surface Water for Irrigation Purposes: The Southwestern and Coastal River Systems in Ghana  [PDF]
Sandow Mark Yidana, Patrick Asamoah Sakyi, Gareth Stamp
Journal of Water Resource and Protection (JWARP) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/jwarp.2011.310080
Abstract: Surface water basins all over the world are very crucial in irrigation industries. Irrigation schemes are particularly crucial in the agricultural economies due largely to the fact that global climate change has led to drastic changes in rainfall patterns. As a result, rain-fed agriculture alone is no more sustainable and irrigation schemes are being encouraged as poverty reduction/eradication strategies in the developing countries. This study was conducted to assess the overall controls on surface water resources in the coastal and south-western river basins in Ghana, and determine the suitability of these surface waters for irrigation activities. Multivariate statistical methods were applied to data on the physico-chemical parameters from the coastal and southwestern river basins. This study finds that the quality of surface water from these basins is controlled principally by leachate of chemicals from solid and mine wastes, the chemistry of rainfall, weathering of underlying silicate mineral-rich rocks and sediments, agricultural and domestic wastes. All the parameters are within the acceptable national concentration ranges for most domestic and industrial purposes. Sodium adsorption ratio (SAR) was used to assess the quality of water from the two basins for irrigation activities. The SAR values for all the months and years sampled are lower than 4 and the electrical conductivity values are equally low due to generally low ionic concentrations. When plotted on the Wilcox diagram, the data for all the months for the two years of the study, plot within the “excellent to good” category, suggesting that water from the area is of acceptable quality for irrigation activities.
Nutrient-Induced Growth of Coliform and HPC Bacteria in Drinking-Water Pipes  [PDF]
Patrick Asamoah Sakyi, Roland Asare, Chris Anani, Samuel Boakye Dampare
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2012.36061
Abstract: We conducted a study on a model drinking water distribution system to evaluate the impact of nutrient in the form of sodium acetate on the growth and survival of coliform and heterotrophic plate count (HPC) bacteria for a maximum of 21 days residence time of water in pipes. Our results show that, besides the nutrient added and the absence of any additional source of contamination and additional supply of nutrient, there was significant growth of the above mentioned bacteria in the pipes and bottles for a couple of days, after which the bacterial population began to decrease. The results indicate that the bacteria used the nutrient to grow and multiply until the nutrient was totally consumed and became depleted in the bulk water phase, after which the bacterial population reached a near stationary level and subsequently declined. This suggests the death of some of the bacteria and their dead cells were used by other bacteria for growth and survival. Using a detection limit of 3.3 CFU/100 mL for the coliforms, the study shows that after sometime, no bacteria were found in the water phase of the pipe, however, the biofilm in the pipes still harbored some of the bacteria. The results have revealed that the bacteria also have the tendency to move from the water phase to the biofilm since the latter provides a more suitable environment for bacteria to thrive on and grow, thus prolonging their survival in the system.
Impact of Temperature on Bacterial Growth and Survival in Drinking-Water Pipes
Patrick Asamoah Sakyi,Roland Asare
Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: A study of a model drinking water distribution system, using previously used galvanized steel pipes, was carried out to evaluate the impact of temperature on the growth and survival of total coliform, E. coli and Heterotrophic Plate Count (HPC) bacteria for a maximum of 21 days residence time in the water phase in pipes and their respective glass control bottles. The study showed that for water temperatures of 15, 25 and 37oC, HPC bacteria initially increased in the first 2-4 days but much higher at 37oC after which the bacteria began to reduce in numbers. On the other hand, the decline in coliform and E. coli levels was observed after 24 h and this continued until no such bacteria were detected in the water phase. The oligotrophic nature of HPC bacteria allowed them to initially survive and grow in the nutrient-deficient environment, while the copiotrophic coliform and E. coli, which prefer nutritionally rich environments, began to die, hence the decline in their concentration. Whereas the decline in bacteria levels at lower temperatures of 15-25oC may be attributed to starvation and/or the temperature effect, those at ~37oC might have been significantly caused by the relatively higher temperature they were subjected to. The results, thus, established that higher water temperature was seen as important factor in reducing the survival of total coliform, E. coli and HPC bacteria in the water phase in drinking water pipes.
Planning, design and implementation of the enhancing child nutrition through animal source food management (ENAM) project
EK Colecraft, GS Marquis, O Sakyi-Dawson, A Lartey, LM Butler, B Ahunu, MB Reddy, HH Jensen, E Huff-Lonergan, E Canacoo
African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development , 2012,
Abstract: The Global-Livestock Collaborative Research Support Program’s (GL-CRSP) Child Nutrition Project, a controlled feeding trial in rural Kenya, demonstrated the importance of Animal Source Foods (ASF) for children’s micronutrient status and cognitive development. These findings prompted research efforts to understand the constraints to ASF in children’s diets in Africa so as to design targeted interventions to improve the ASF quality of children’s diets. The Enhancing Child Nutrition through Animal Source Management (ENAM) project (2004-2009) emanated from participatory formative research that identified six principal constraints to the inclusion of Animal Source Foods (ASF) in children’s diets in Ghana, including low income of caregivers, poor producer-consumer linkages, inadequate nutrition knowledge and skills of extension staff and caregivers, cultural beliefs, and inequitable household food distribution. To address these constraints, the ENAM project undertook a multidisciplinary community development, research and capacity building initiative with the goal of augmenting caregivers’ access to and use of ASF in children’s diets. Participatory processes were used to implement an integrated microcredit, entrepreneurship and nutrition education intervention with 181 caregivers of children 2- to5-years old in six rural communities across three agro-ecological zones (Guinea Savannah, Forest-Savannah Transitional and Coastal Savannah) of Ghana. Six matched communities from the same ecological zones served as comparison sites. Quantitative methods that included surveys, child anthropometry, and dietary assessment as well as qualitative case studies were used to assess the effect of the intervention on household, caregiver and child outcomes of interest. This paper presents the key features of the planning, design and implementation of the community intervention and the research processes undertaken to assess the project’s impacts. The ENAM project model presents a unique approach for addressing caregivers’ income and knowledge barriers to improve child nutrition in rural Ghana and may be a promising intervention model for scale-up in Ghana and other African countries.
Page 1 /144334
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.