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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 415634 matches for " Aysha M. Al Kandari "
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Virtual Information Services in Academic Libraries in Kuwait  [PDF]
Sajjad ur Rehman, Aysha M. Al Kandari
Open Access Library Journal (OALib Journal) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/oalib.1105543
Abstract:
The purpose of this study is to examine the status and prospect of virtual information services in academic libraries in Kuwait. The study conducted open-ended interviews of managers or heads of information services in 12 academic libraries about management and conduct of virtual information service and the possibilities about the future of these ser-vices. Also observed the functioning of services in 9 libraries. It was found that email was the common method for virtual communication in academic libraries in Kuwait. These libraries lacked in services using live chat and mobile application. Social media was mostly used for an-nouncements and marketing of library services. In addition, private aca-demic libraries provided advanced virtual services as compared to public academic libraries. Eight interviews were conducted by phone due to unavoidable circumstances related to both participants and researcher. One private academic institution did not allow access to its library, denying opportunities for observation. This paper provides insights on the way virtual information services were managed and conducted in these libraries. No similar study was noted in this regional context. The findings may help academic library management a better understanding of the issues and challenges they faced and the opportunities they might benefit in future.
Catalytic Active Sites in Molybdenum Based Catalysts  [PDF]
S. Al-Kandari, H. Al-Kandari, A. M. Mohamed, F. Al-Kharafi, A. Katrib
Modern Research in Catalysis (MRC) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/mrc.2013.22A001
Abstract:

In situ metal, acid and metal-acid (bifunctional) catalytic active functions were prepared following partial reduction by hydrogen of MoO3 deposited on TiO2 at temperatures between 623 K and 673 K. The bifunctional structure is obtained following the reduction of MoO3 to MoO2. The metallic properties of MoO2 are attributed to the delocalized p electrons above the Mo atoms place along the C-axis of the deformed rutile structure of this phase and observed as a density of states at the Fermi level. Hydrogen dissociation by this metallic function and bonding of the produced H atoms to surface oxygen atoms results in the formation of Bronsted acid Mo-OH function(s). Accordingly, a bifunctional (metal-acid) MoO2-x(OH)y structure is formed on the TiO2 support. The bifunctional properties enabled to perform isomerization reactions of light naphtha hydrocarbons into branched species of higher octane number. This catalyst is proposed as a possible replacement of the commercially used Pt deposited on chlorinated alumina catalysts in which toxic chlorine is employed and benzene is produced as a byproduct of n-hexane isomerization. The acid function in this bifunctional Mo system is quenched following the addition of controlled amount of sodium. The presence of only the metallic function in this modified NaMoTi system is monitored via the hydrogenation of olefins and enabled to define the bifunctional mechanism of the hydrocarbon isomerization process performed by MoO

Catalytic Hydrogenation Reactions on Molybdenum Oxide  [PDF]
H. Al-Kandari, S. Al-Kandari, A. M. Mohamed, F. Al-Kharafi, A. Katrib
Modern Research in Catalysis (MRC) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/mrc.2015.41005
Abstract: Partially reduced molybdenum trioxide deposited on titania under hydrogen at 673 K for 12 h ena- bled to convert several surface atomic layers to the catalytically active bifunctional (metal-acid) MoO2-x(OH)y/TiO2 (MoTi) structure. The formed metallic function is the result of π bonding between adjacent Mo-Mo atoms placed along the C-axis of the rutile structure of MoO2. Delocalization of these π electrons produces a wire like atomic metal. This resembles in a way, the small Pt particles deposited on a support. Moreover, dissociated hydrogen atoms are bonded to sample surface oxygen to produce Brønsted acid Mo-OH function(s). These metal-acidic properties have been tested for several catalytic reactions requiring one or bothcatalytic functions. In this order, 2-propanol species could be considered as a model test of the acidic function via dehydration of the molecule to propene, while hydrogenation of the produced propene to propane is performed by the metallic function. Moreover, hydrogenation of 2-propanol to acetone, requires relatively strong metallic function. In this order, addition of small amount of alkali metal like rubidium will suppress the acidic function in MoO2-x(OH)y/TiO2 and enhance the metallic function strength. The performance of the metallic function alone in this case will be evaluated. Titanium dioxide is employed in this catalytic system as a support. It does not have any catalytic effect. Association of XPS-UPS, ISS sur-face techniques with catalytic performances of this catalytic MoTi system will be presented.
Structural and functional results of indirect diode laser treatment for retinopathy of prematurity from 1999 to 2003 in Kuwait
Wani VB, Al Sabti K, Kumar N, Raizada S, Al Kandari J, Al Harbi M, Sawaan R, Rajaram U, Al-Naqeeb N, Shukkur M
Clinical Ophthalmology , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S38915
Abstract: ructural and functional results of indirect diode laser treatment for retinopathy of prematurity from 1999 to 2003 in Kuwait Case Series (544) Total Article Views Authors: Wani VB, Al Sabti K, Kumar N, Raizada S, Al Kandari J, Al Harbi M, Sawaan R, Rajaram U, Al-Naqeeb N, Shukkur M Published Date February 2013 Volume 2013:7 Pages 271 - 278 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OPTH.S38915 Received: 08 October 2012 Accepted: 19 December 2012 Published: 05 February 2013 Vivek B Wani,1,2 Khalid Al Sabti,1,3 Niranjan Kumar,1 Seemant Raizada,1 Jamal Al Kandari,1 Mohammad Al Harbi,4 Rima Sawaan,5 Usha Rajaram,6 Niran Al-Naqeeb,7 Mumtaz Shukkur8 1Department of Ophthalmology, Al Bahar Ophthalmology Center, Kuwait city, Kuwait; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Al Adan Hospital, Al Adan, Kuwait; 3Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Jabriya, Kuwait; 4Department of Neonatology, Al Sabah Maternity Hospital, Kuwait City, Kuwait; 5Department of Neonatology, Al Farwaniya Hospital, Al Farwaniya, Kuwait; 6Department of Neonatology, Al Jahra Hospital, Al Jahra, Kuwait; 7Department of Neonatology, Al Adan Hospital, Al Adan, Kuwait; 8Department of Community Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Jabriya, Kuwait Purpose: The purpose was to report the structural, visual, and refractive outcomes of infants treated for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) with laser and to identify the risk factors for unfavorable outcomes. Materials and methods: The charts of infants with severe ROP treated by diode laser in a tertiary center during the period April 1999 to November 2003 were reviewed. Treated infants were followed up for fundus examination, visual acuity assessment, and cycloplegic refraction. Data regarding ocular risk factors, like zones of ROP and the extent of extraretinal proliferations, and data regarding various systemic risk factors were collected. A minimum follow up of 6 months was needed for inclusion in the study of structural outcome. A minimum follow up of 24 months was needed for the study of visual and refractive outcomes. The outcomes measured were: rate of unfavorable structural outcome, unfavorable visual outcome (visual acuity < 20/40), and high myopia (myopia ≥ 5 diopters). The ocular and systemic risk factors were studied for their significance in the development of unfavorable outcomes. Results: Two hundred seventy eyes of 148 infants were treated for severe ROP, out of which 20 eyes (7.4%) had unfavorable structural outcome. Visual data were available for 149 eyes of 81 infants, of which 70 eyes (47%) had unfavorable visual outcome. Refractive data were available for 131 eyes of 72 infants, and high myopia was present in 23 (17.6%) eyes. Zone I disease was the significant risk factor for unfavorable structural (P < 0.0001), unfavorable visual outcome (P = 0.03), and for high myopia (P < 0.0001). Lower postconceptional age at treatment was significant for unfavorable structural outcome (P = 0.03) and high myopia (P < 0.0001). Presence of sepsis (P = 0.029) and
Breast cancer in patients with sickle cell disease can be treated safely with weekly paclitaxel
Aysha S. Al Zaman
Saudi Medical Journal , 2013,
Abstract: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among females; nevertheless so far no data are available in the literature on the safety of oncological treatments in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). Here we report for the first time the case of a 39-year- woman with sickle cell disease who presented with metastatic breast cancer and was treated accordingly with weekly paclitaxel 80 mg/m2 D1, 8 and 15 every 28 days as a standard regimen for metastatic breast cancer. Our patient managed to complete the full course of the chemotherapy (18 doses) of weekly treatment without any dose reductions or delays. Main side effects were grade1 nausea; grade 2 mucositis, however surprisingly there wasn't any episode of febrile neutropenia, anemia or thrombocytopenia. Moreover, patient had no vaso-occlusive crisis while on chemotherapy. Weekly paclitaxel is both safe and well tolerated in sickle cell disease patients with breast cancer.
Practical Use of Stairs to Assess Fitness, Prescribe and Perform Physical Activity Training  [PDF]
Jasem Ramadan Al Kandari, Salman Mohammad, Ruqayyah Al-Hashem, Girma Telahoun, Mario Barac-Nieto
Health (Health) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/health.2016.813141
Abstract: Aim: Evaluating climbing stairs for prescription and implementation of physical activity regimes. Methods: Healthy females (F, n = 14), and males (M, n = 15) participated. By climbing 100 steps of stairs with 0.173 m height, Heart rate (HR) and oxygen uptake were measured throughout the floors; Blood pressure (BP) was measured at ground and the 5th floors only. Results: Energy increased from 2 to 7.6 was metabolic equivalents (METs = 3.5 ml O2/min.kg) at 17.3 m elevation in 2 min. at the 5th floor, and percent Heart Rate Reserve (%HRR) was 66.17% in F and 48.7% in M, proportional to their aerobic efforts. Average climbing efficiency was 15.8 ± 2.3% (n = 29). Aerobic capacity estimated dividing the highest work rate (17.3 Kg.m/2min.Kg × 0.00239 = 0.0207 Kcal/min.Kg), by fractional effort (F = 0.6617, M = 0.487) and fractional efficiency (0.158), at 5 Kcal/L O2 was 0.040 in F and 0.054 L O2/Kg.min in M. Minimum training intensity reached at the 3rd floor by F. In M the highest %HRR reached was 48.7% at the 5th floor, insufficient for training. Conclusions: Stairs used for submaximal evaluation of aerobic capacity and for target intensity prescription. Training, levels climbed, repetitions per day (if 5, 100 Kcal per day, ascending) and number of days/week are adjusted. Full regime requires up to 7.6 METs, a total of 532 and 140 MET.min/week ascending and descending, respectively. Intensities >7.6 MET, climbing rate should be >8.65 m/min. Limiting ascent to 1 (3.5 METs) or 2 (5.5 METs) floors or only descents (2 - 3 METs) may be used for unfit subjects. This method is useful for those with no access to sophisticated facilities.
Public Key Infrastructure: A Survey  [PDF]
Aysha Albarqi, Ethar Alzaid, Fatimah Al Ghamdi, Somaya Asiri, Jayaprakash Kar
Journal of Information Security (JIS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jis.2015.61004
Abstract: As security is essential in communications through electronic networks, development of structures providing high levels of security is needed. Public Key Infrastructure (PKI) is a way of providing security measures by implementing the means of key pairs among users. In this paper, an overview of the public key infrastructure is discussed that includes various components and operation, some well known PKIs and their comparisons. Also we discuss current implementations, risk and challenges of PKIs.
Complete Heart Block in Thyrotoxicosis, Is It a Manifestation of Thyroid Storm? A Case Report and Review of the Literature
Rashed Al Bannay,Aysha Husain,Saeed Khalaf
Case Reports in Endocrinology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/318398
Abstract: Thyrotoxicosis complicated by advance degree atrioventricular block, a rare complication of a common disease. The term apathetic thyrotoxicosis, where palpitations and cardiac involvement are the sole manifestations of disease, is well known. Thyroxin's ability to sensitize the catecholamine receptors causing tachyarrhythmias is well addressed. However, as an aetiology for advanced heart block, thyrotoxicosis is ranked as one of the rarest.
Complete Heart Block in Thyrotoxicosis, Is It a Manifestation of Thyroid Storm? A Case Report and Review of the Literature
Rashed Al Bannay,Aysha Husain,Saeed Khalaf
Case Reports in Endocrinology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/318398
Abstract: Thyrotoxicosis complicated by advance degree atrioventricular block, a rare complication of a common disease. The term apathetic thyrotoxicosis, where palpitations and cardiac involvement are the sole manifestations of disease, is well known. Thyroxin's ability to sensitize the catecholamine receptors causing tachyarrhythmias is well addressed. However, as an aetiology for advanced heart block, thyrotoxicosis is ranked as one of the rarest. 1. Case Presentation Mrs. T.R.M. is a 37-yr-old Egyptian woman who presented with a history of shortness of breath, palpitations, and recurrent syncope that had lasted three days. The patient has been thyrotoxic for the last 10 years with erratic follow-up appointments and poor adherence to her treatment program. At presentation, she had progressive shortness of breath that had been occurring for the past 3 days and was associated with palpitations that she perceived as slow and heavy. She reported recurrent, unprovoked syncopal attacks that coincided with her palpitations. She had no history of chest pain or ankle oedema. In a review of systems, she reported diarrhoea associated with colicky abdominal pain and fever. The patient is a housewife who has had six pregnancies, the most recent of which was in 2008. The mode of delivery was a lower segment Cesarean section due to a twin pregnancy that had been complicated by placenta previa and antepartum hemorrhage. The remainder of her obstetric history was significant, including two abortions and two intrauterine deaths. Her first pregnancy was uneventful. She justified her noncompliance with antithyroid medications by relating these drugs to her complicated obstetric history. On examination, she was apprehensive, restless, mildly icteric, and had a low-grade fever. Her blood pressure was 140/80?mmHg, and she had a heart rate of 54 beats/min. Her extremities were moist, and she was sweating excessively. She had a diffuse goitre with bruit. Thyrotoxicosis-related eye signs, such as lid retraction and lid lag, were evident. Cannon A waves were visible in her jugular venous pressure (JVP). Auscultation of the precordium demonstrated audible heart sounds with variable S1 intensity. Her lungs were clear, and she was not experiencing congestive heart failure. The abdominal examination was unremarkable except for diffuse, mild tenderness, and active bowel sounds. The basic metabolic workup is shown in the Table 1. Table 1: Results of blood investigations done during patient’s admission. The septic workup and autoimmune profile were normal. Her electrocardiogram showed complete
Nodes distribution and selection of accurate mobility Framework to systematically analyze its impact for improving performance of routing protocols for mobile ad hoc networks through Simulations
Sonika Kandari,Dr. M.K. Pandey
International Journal on Computer Science and Engineering , 2011,
Abstract: Research on mobile ad hoc routing protocols performance based on simulation relies on choice of realistic mobility model. However, in the absence of realistic data movement, Synthetic models may be used for generating movement pattern. In order to capture the behavior of individuals moving in groups and between groups, there is a need for defining models for clearly representing group mobility based on the dimension of the relationships among the people carrying the mobile devices in mobile ad hoc networking scenarios. Sociability and attractivity between each group of hosts are the two main issueswhich may govern the pattern of movement of mobile hosts. Different mobility models have been proposed by researchers in the recent past for describing the movement pattern of mobile users, showing variation in their location, velocity and acceleration over time but most of them lack realistic behavior .As mobile ad hoc networks are not currently deployed on a very large scale and research in this area is mostly simulation based focusing on Mobility pattern constituting an important parameter in analyzing the performance of Mobile ad hoc routing protocols. Hence, it becomes necessary to study the behavior of mobility models and their impact on MANET routing protocols. In this paper we surveyed and examined different categories of mobility models proposed in the recent research literature and attempted to provide an overview of current research status of mobility modeling along with design principles for a perfect mobility model.
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