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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 90 matches for " Awatif Alanazi "
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Neuroblastoma in Saudi Children: A Single Center Experience (2006-2014)  [PDF]
Zaid Al Naqib, Atif A. Ahmed, Musa Al Harbi, Fahad Al Manjomi, Zaheer Ullah Khan, Awatif Alanazi, Othman Mosleh, Walid Ballourah, Mohammed Rayis
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2015.610098
Abstract: Introduction: Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in childhood and survival rate has improved during the last few decades. Only a few studies, related to Neuroblastoma in Saudi Arabian children, have been performed. We report epidemiologic data and our clinical experience from the department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology (PHO), King Fahad Medical City (KFMC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Method: A retrospective observational study of all patients, with diagnosis of Neuroblastoma, who attended PHO-KFMC from July 2006 to June 2014 was performed. The survival periods (overall survival and disease-free survival) and the final outcomes for patients treated and followed at KFMC were recorded. The survival data were statistically correlated with the clinical, pathological and biological features of patients and tumors and compared to national and international cohorts. Results: Eight-year data were available for the 42 patients of which 22 (52.4%) were male and 20 (47.6%) were females. Age at diagnosis ranged 0 - 91 months with a mean and median of 26.3 and 18.5 months respectively. 16 (38.1%) patients were under one year and 26 (61.9%) above 1 year of age. The event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) rates were 66.5% and 71.5% respectively. EFS and OS among those who were <1 year age at presentation was 75% and 82%, whereas ≥1 yr age group had 59% and 62% survival rates respectively. Patients with tumors in the adrenal had considerably lower EFS (59%) and OS (63%); in comparison to patients with tumors sites other than the adrenal who had EFS and OS of 85% and 89% respectively. Both EFS and OS survival rates at the end of follow-up interval were 100.0%, in the low and intermediate risk groups. In contrast, patients in the high risk group had EFS and OS rates of 44% and 48% respectively. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Our results are very encouraging and comparable with known published international cohorts, and reveal an excellent outcome for stage 1, 2, 3 & 4 s. The prognosis for advanced (stage 4) disease remains rather poor. A collaborative Saudi-wide effort, with an emphasis on research in detecting clinical and biologic characteristics of aggressive disease and tailoring therapy, is needed.
Pediatric Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Retrospective 7-Year Experience in Children & Adolescents with Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Treated in King Fahad Medical City (KFMC)  [PDF]
Nahla Ali Mobark, Suha A. Tashkandi, Wafa Al Shakweer, Khalid Al Saidi, Suha A. Fataftah, Mohammed M. Al Nemer, Awatif Alanazi, Mohammed Rayis, Walid Ballourah, Othman Mosleh, Zaheer Ullah, Fahad El Manjomi, Musa Al Harbi
Journal of Cancer Therapy (JCT) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jct.2015.64033
Abstract:

Background: Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma is an aggressive malignant disease in children and adolescents. Although it is the fourth most common malignancy in Saudi children as reported in Saudi cancer registry, less information is available about pediatric Non-Hodgkin lymphoma and its outcome in Saudi Arabia. Study Objectives: To provide demographic data, disease characteristics, treatment protocol, toxicity and outcome of treatment in children & adolescents with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma treated at KFMC. This study will form base line for future studies about pediatric Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in KFMC, which may help to improve outcome for children with cancer in Saudi Arabia. Study Patients and Method: We retrospectively analyzed 28 children and adolescents diagnosed to have Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma at KFMC between December 2006 and December 2013, followed-up through June 2014. Results: Of the 28 patients, 10 (35.7%) girls and 18 (64.3%) boys, the male-to-female ratio was 1.8; 1. The median age at time of diagnosis was 6.4 years old (range 2.0 to 13.0 years old). The majority of patients (64.3%) were aged between 5 and 12 years old. Burkitt’s lymphoma BL/BLL was the most common pathological subtype (60.7%), and DLBCL was the second most common subtype (21.4%). Abdominal and Retroperitoneal involvement was the most common primary site (78.6%) including the ileocaecal region. Most of the children presented with advanced Stage III and IV (75%), Cytogenetic study which screens specifically for the t (8; 14) (q24; q32) a characteristic genetic feature of Burkitt’s Lymphoma was obtained from 21 patients, variant rearrangement was observed in 3/21 samples and complex chromosomes karyotype in addition to IGH/MYC rearrangement was observed in 2/21 samples. Those patients presented with very aggressive lymphoma and combined BM and CNS involvement. We use the French-American-British Mature B-Cell Lymphoma 96 Protocol (FAB LMB 96) for treatment fornewly diagnosed Mature B-Cell type NHL and high risk ALL CCG 1961 Protocol for lymphoblastic lymphoma and international Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma 99 Study Protocol for ALCL. The median follow-up in patients not experiencing an adverse event was 53.1 months. The estimated 3-year EFE and OS rates in the entire cohort of patients with newly diagnosed NHL treated in the KFMC were 85.2% and 89.2% respectively; Overall survival (OS) rate of patients with mature

Antibacterial Effects of Extracts of Two Types of Red Sea Algae  [PDF]
Awatif Al-Judaibi
Journal of Biosciences and Medicines (JBM) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jbm.2014.22012
Abstract: Introduction: Intestinal bacteria are exposed many external influences, including drugs, causing the emergence of strains resistant to the effects of antibiotics. Consequently, the discovery of new antibiotics that affect resistant strains is required. Marine algae offer a source of renewable natural compounds with antimicrobial effects. Therefore, the aim of this study was to detect some of these compounds and examine their impact on enteric bacteria. Methodology: Escherichia coli, Salmonella typhi, Shigella dysenteriae, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Enterobacter aerogenes were tested with extracts of Turbinaria triquetra and Halimeda opuntia extracted with methanol, ethanol, petroleum ether, or dimethyl formamide solvents. We measured bacterial growth inhibition, the minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs), and potassium leakage, and analyzed the bacterial cells with scanning electron microscopy and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Results: The T. triquetra extract produced with methanol strongly affected the bacteria tested. When the results for T. triquetra and H. opuntia were compared with those of omacillin, the T. triquetra and H. opuntia extracts in most solvents were more effective than the antibiotic. Differences in the bacterial growth inhibition and MICs depended on the type of alga and the solvent used. At the end of the incubation period, potassium leakage had increased by 62.98% for E. coli, 61.24% for S. typhi, 61.32% for S. dysenteriae, 64.02% for K. pneumoniae, and 63.10% for E. aerogenes when treated T. triquetra. Conclusion: Turbinaria triquetra extracted with methanol strongly affected the growth of the bacteria tested. Therefore, it is a potential source of natural antibacterial compounds.
Knowledge of breast cancer and its risk and protective factors among women in Riyadh
Alam Awatif
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: Background: We conducted this study to assess knowledge of breast cancer and sources of information about breast cancer among women in Riyadh. We also analyzed whether associations existed between de-mographic variables, knowledge of breast cancer, and the practice of breast self-examination and use of mammography screening. Methods: Women interested in participating in this community-based descriptive study provided data by completing a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Results: Of 864 participating women, 84% were Saudi, 45% were mar-ried and 67.8% had a university level education. Eighty percent were be-tween the ages of 20 to 50 years. Knowledge of breast self examination (BSE) was high; 82% (95% confidence intervals [CI], 79.2%-84.4%) knew about BSE, while 61% (95% CI: 57.9%-64.5%) knew about mammogra-phy, but only 41.2% (95% CI, 37.9%-44.5%) had performed BSE and 18.2% (95%CI, 15.5%-20.8%) had had mammography screening. Knowledge of breast cancer, risk factors and protective factors for breast cancer was moderate. There was a statistically significant association between the demographic characteristics (marital status, educational status and family history of breast cancer) and knowledge and practice of BSE and mammography. Conclusion: Though it has limitations, this study revealed an imbal-ance between the knowledge and practice of BSE among women. It also showed that there is only moderate knowledge of risk and protective factors for breast cancer and that knowledge and practice of BSE and mammograms vary according to marital and educational status. Hence, frequent community-based awareness programs are needed so that all women can know and practice BSE, which in turn helps to prevent breast cancer.
How do medical students in their clinical years perceive basic sciences courses at King Saud University?
Alam Awatif
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: Background and Objectives : The inclusion of detailed basic science courses in medical school curricula has been a concern of students. The main objective of this study was to explore the attitudes of medical students towards basic sciences courses taught to them in the preclinical years and the applicability of these courses to current clinical practice. Design and Setting : A cross-sectional survey was conducted during 2008-2009 among medical students in their clinical years at King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Methods : Thirty percent of all students (n=314) were randomly selected to receive a questionnaire designed to evaluate their opinions about course load, ability to recall information, value of practical sessions, availability of references and course guidelines, and the applicability of individual courses to clinical practice. Results : Students identified anatomy and pathology as the courses most overloaded with content (76% and 70%, respectively). Half of the students felt they retained the most knowledge of physiology (50%), while less than a quarter of students (19%) felt they retained the most information from biochemistry coursework. The role of practical sessions in facilitating theoretical understanding was more evident in anatomy (69%). Physiology was perceived as the subject with the highest applicability to clinical practice (66%), while pathology (29%) was identified as the subject with the least practical application. Students became increasingly negative in their opinions about basic science courses as they progressed through their medical education. Conclusion : Current attitudes of medical students towards their basic science courses indicate a need to reform the curricula so as to maximize the benefit of these courses.
Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences
Alanazi AF
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S28590
Abstract: rriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences Original Research (2156) Total Article Views Authors: Alanazi AF Published Date March 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 7 - 18 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S28590 Received: 26 November 2011 Accepted: 24 December 2011 Published: 08 March 2012 Abdullah Foraih Alanazi College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Background: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia. Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum. Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation. Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery. Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.
Pravastatin Provides Antioxidant Activity and Protection Of Erythrocytes Loaded Primaquine
Fars Alanazi
International Journal of Medical Sciences , 2010,
Abstract: Loading erythrocytes with Primaquine (PQ) is advantageous. However, PQ produces damage to erythrocytes through free radicals production. Statins have antioxidant action and are involved in protective effect against situation of oxidative stress. Thus the protective effect of pravastatin (PS) against PQ induced oxidative damage to human erythrocytes was investigated in the current studies upon loading to erythrocytes. The erythrocytes were classified into; control erythrocytes, erythrocytes incubated with either 2 mM of PS or 2 mM of PQ, and erythrocytes incubated with combination of PS plus PQ. After incubation for 30 min, the effect of the drugs on erythrocytes hemolysis as well as some biomarkers of oxidative stress (none protein thiols, protein carbonyl, thiobarbituric acid reactive substance) were investigated. Our results revealed that PS maintains these biomarkers at values similar to that of control ones. On the other hand, PQ cause significant increases of protein carbonyl by 115% and thiobarbituric acid reactive substance by 225% while non-protein thiols were significantly decreased by 112 % compared with control erythrocytes. PS pre-incubation before PQ exerts marked reduction of these markers in comparison with PQ alone. Moreover, at NaCl concentrations between 0.4% and 0.8%, PQ causes significant increase of Red Blood Cells (RBCs) hemolysis in comparison with the other groups (P<0. 001). Scanning electron micrograph indicates spherocytes formation by PQ incubation, but in the other groups the discocyte shape of erythrocytes was preserved. The reduction of protein oxidation and lipids peroxidation by PS is related to antioxidants effect of this statin. Preservation of erythrocytes fragility and morphology by PS are related to its free radicals scavenging effect. It is concluded that pravastatin has protective effect against erythrocytes dysfunction related any situations associated with increased oxidative stress, especially when loaded with PQ.
Curriculum design of emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences
Alanazi AF
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Abdullah Foraih AlanaziCollege of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaBackground: The emergency medical services program at the College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, was adapted from the integrated problem-based learning curriculum of Flinders University, Adelaide, South Australia.Purpose: The purpose of this article is to discuss the major adaptations required for adoption of the full-fledged PBL curriculum, use of sequential blocks, and multilayer alignment of the curriculum.Methods: A logical model and step-by-step approach were used to design the curriculum. Several studies using Delphi methods, focus group interviews, and expert opinions were performed to identify the priority health problems; related competencies, learning objectives, and learning strategies; the web-based curriculum for delivery; student assessment; and program evaluation.Results: Sixty priority health problems were identified for inclusion in different blocks of the curriculum. Identified competencies matched the satisfaction of different stakeholders, and ascertained learning objectives and strategies were aligned with the competencies. A full-fledged web-based curriculum was designed and an assessment was created that aligned with a blueprint of the objectives and the mode of delivery.Conclusion: Step-by-step design ensures the multilayer alignment of the curriculum, including priority health problems, competencies, objectives, student assessment, and program evaluation.Keywords: emergency medical services, problem-based learning, logical model, step-by-step approach, multilayer alignment
Reply
Alanazi Marzouqah
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2010,
Abstract:
A Note on the Ranking of Saudi Arabian Universities based on highlycited.com
Eisa Alanazi
Computer Science , 2014,
Abstract: Recently, Thomson Reuters has published its 2014 list of highly cited researchers (HCRs)[1]. Initial studies over the list [2] suggested that some universities (for instance, King Abdulaziz University in Saudi Arabia) may have been manipulating its world ranking by contracting with highly cited researchers. In this work, we analyse the ranking of other Saudi universities based solely on the list. Our analysis suggests that other universities in Saudi Arabia do not follow the steps of King Abdulaziz University when it comes to contracting with HCRs.
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