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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 573 matches for " Aronoff SC "
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Utility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Mikailov A, Kane I, Aronoff SC, Luck R, DelVecchio MT
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S38652
Abstract: ility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis Review (1533) Total Article Views Authors: Mikailov A, Kane I, Aronoff SC, Luck R, DelVecchio MT Published Date January 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 23 - 29 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S38652 Received: 29 September 2012 Accepted: 06 November 2012 Published: 16 January 2013 Anar Mikailov,1 Ilona Kane,2 Stephen C Aronoff,3 Raemma Luck,3, Michael T DelVecchio3 1Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, 2St Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Raemma Luck is now deceased Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate macrolides as an adjunct to an asthma controller regimen in children with asthma. Methods: Prospective clinical trials of macrolide therapy in children with asthma using outcome measures of change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or oral corticosteroid requirement were searched for in PubMed up to December 2009. The reference lists of studies were also included in the analysis, as well as those listed in published meta-analyses. Results: The literature search yielded 116 studies, six of which were included in this meta-analysis. The change in FEV1 from baseline with adjunctive use of macrolide therapy in all children was not significant (0.25% predicted; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37, 0.86 predicted, P = 0.43); however, the change in FEV1 among children receiving daily oral corticosteroids was significant (3.89% predicted; 95% CI 0.01, 7.79, P = 0.05). Addition of macrolide therapy to the treatment of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma resulted in a statistically significant decrease in daily corticosteroid dosage ( 3.45 mg/day; 95% CI 5.79, 1.09 mg/day, P = 0.004). This reduction in daily corticosteroid dosage was directly proportional to the duration of macrolide therapy ( 0.17 mg methylprednisolone per week of macrolide therapy; 95% CI 0.33, 0.021, P = 0.025). Conclusion: Addition of macrolides to the treatment regimen of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma improves FEV1 and decreases the daily dosage of corticosteroids required for control in these children. The degree of dose reduction is directly related to the duration of macrolide therapy. Additional large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive macrolide use in children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma are required to verify this observation.
Utility of adjunctive macrolide therapy in treatment of children with asthma: a systematic review and meta-analysis
Mikailov A,Kane I,Aronoff SC,Luck R
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2013,
Abstract: Anar Mikailov,1 Ilona Kane,2 Stephen C Aronoff,3 Raemma Luck,3, Michael T DelVecchio31Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA, 2St Christopher's Hospital for Children, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Pediatrics, Temple University School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Raemma Luck is now deceasedBackground: The purpose of this study was to investigate macrolides as an adjunct to an asthma controller regimen in children with asthma.Methods: Prospective clinical trials of macrolide therapy in children with asthma using outcome measures of change in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or oral corticosteroid requirement were searched for in PubMed up to December 2009. The reference lists of studies were also included in the analysis, as well as those listed in published meta-analyses.Results: The literature search yielded 116 studies, six of which were included in this meta-analysis. The change in FEV1 from baseline with adjunctive use of macrolide therapy in all children was not significant (0.25% predicted; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.37, 0.86 predicted, P = 0.43); however, the change in FEV1 among children receiving daily oral corticosteroids was significant (3.89% predicted; 95% CI 0.01, 7.79, P = 0.05). Addition of macrolide therapy to the treatment of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma resulted in a statistically significant decrease in daily corticosteroid dosage ( 3.45 mg/day; 95% CI 5.79, 1.09 mg/day, P = 0.004). This reduction in daily corticosteroid dosage was directly proportional to the duration of macrolide therapy ( 0.17 mg methylprednisolone per week of macrolide therapy; 95% CI 0.33, 0.021, P = 0.025).Conclusion: Addition of macrolides to the treatment regimen of children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma improves FEV1 and decreases the daily dosage of corticosteroids required for control in these children. The degree of dose reduction is directly related to the duration of macrolide therapy. Additional large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of adjunctive macrolide use in children with oral corticosteroid-dependent asthma are required to verify this observation.Keywords: chronic asthma, macrolides, corticosteroid sparing
Cyclooxygenase Inhibition in Sepsis: Is There Life after Death?
David M. Aronoff
Mediators of Inflammation , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/696897
Abstract: Prostaglandins are important mediators and modulators of the inflammatory response to infection. The prostaglandins participate in the pathogenesis of hemodynamic collapse, organ failure, and overwhelming inflammation that characterize severe sepsis and shock. In light of this, cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibiting pharmacological agents have been extensively studied for their capacity to ameliorate the aberrant physiological and immune responses during severe sepsis. Animal models of sepsis, using the systemic administration of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or live pathogens, have been used to examine the effectiveness of COX inhibition as a treatment for severe sepsis. These studies have largely shown beneficial effects on mortality. However, human studies have failed to show clinical utility of COX inhibitor treatment in severely septic patients. Why this approach “worked” in animals but not in humans might reflect differences in the controlled nature of animal investigations compared to human studies. This paper contrasts the impact of COX inhibitors on mortality in animal models of sepsis and human studies of sepsis and examines potential reasons for differences between these two settings.
The first year of Infectious Disease Reports
David M. Aronoff
Infectious Disease Reports , 2010, DOI: 10.4081/idr.2010.e16
Abstract: It is exciting to note that within our first year IDR has published original studies, review articles, and case reports from Australia, Brazil, Cuba, Italy, Thailand, Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Uganda, the UK, and the USA. The first two volumes of IDR have touched upon major problems in our field, including HIV, influenza, Clostridium difficile, neglected tropical diseases, and infections in transplant recipients.
Welcome to Infectious Disease Reports: a message from the Editor
David M. Aronoff
Infectious Disease Reports , 2009, DOI: 10.4081/idr.2009.e1
Abstract: None
Layer- and column-specific knockout of NMDA receptors in pyramidal neurons of the mouse barrel cortex.
Rachel Aronoff,Carl Petersen
Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience , 2007, DOI: 10.3389/neuro.07.001.2007
Abstract: Viral vectors injected into the mouse brain offer the possibility for localized genetic modifications in a highly controlled manner. Lentivector injection into mouse neocortex transduces cells within a diameter of approximately 200μm, which closely matches the lateral scale of a column in barrel cortex. The depth and volume of the injection determines which cortical layer is transduced. Furthermore, transduced gene expression from the lentivector can be limited to predominantly pyramidal neurons by using a 1.3kb fragment of the αCaMKII promoter. This technique therefore allows genetic manipulation of a specific cell type in defined columns and layers of the neocortex. By expressing Cre recombinase from such a lentivector in gene-targeted mice carrying a floxed gene, highly specific genetic lesions can be induced. Here, we demonstrate the utility of this approach by specifically knocking out NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in pyramidal neurons in the somatosensory barrel cortex of gene-targeted mice carrying floxed NMDAR 1 genes. Neurons transduced with lentivector encoding GFP and Cre recombinase exhibit not only reductions in NMDAR 1 mRNA levels, but reduced NMDAR-dependent currents and pairing-induced synaptic potentiation. This technique for knockout of NMDARs in a cell type, column- and layer-specific manner in the mouse somatosensory cortex may help further our understanding of the functional roles of NMDARs in vivo during sensory perception and learning.
Supporting the Success of Students—One of the Factors to Optimize the Role of the School through Its Cooperation with the Family  [PDF]
Sc. Vlora Sylaj
Creative Education (CE) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2013.45044
Abstract:

This article aims to contribute to the growing interest and consideration to support the success of students by the school and the family. This actually leads to the optimization of the role of the school. Through answering the research questions, the paper could serve readers to reflect for the better cooperation between parents and school in terms of supporting the success of students. This study reflects upon the importance of qualitative collaboration, namely to enrich the public opinion with the valuable information about the cooperation between school and home. The purpose of this article is to ascertain whether it affects the level of contacts between school and family by supporting the success of students from the school. This study used quantitative method and aims to find answers to the following questions: What are the school and the family factors that support the success of students? Does this affect the level of contacts between the family and the school? Research hypothesis: The level of contacts between the school and families affected by the support by the school for students’ success. We have included 400 teachers and 400 parents from rural areas in this study, as well as 300 teachers and 300 parents of fourth classes’ from the urban areas. They come from the various city schools in Kosovo. Systematic sample was randomly selected, and we have compiled the questionnaire. A team of pedagogues, who have been previously trained to use this questionnaire, took attitudes of both subjects. Data were analyzed by SPSS 20 program. The study has reached some findings and conclusions. Participants’ responses indicate that the level of contact between the school and families is affected by the factor supporting the success of students by the school.

Postpartum Invasive Group A Streptococcal Disease in the Modern Era
David M. Aronoff,Zuber D. Mulla
Infectious Diseases in Obstetrics and Gynecology , 2008, DOI: 10.1155/2008/796892
Abstract: To describe the clinical features of individuals hospitalized for postpartum invasive group A Streptococcus (GAS) infection, a retrospective, population-based study of hospitalized patients in the state of Florida was conducted. Cases of postpartum invasive GAS infection (occurring within 42 days of delivery) were compared to women with other manifestations of invasive GAS disease with respect to their age at the time of admission. Four cases of postpartum invasive GAS infection were detected in this population, yielding a prevalence of 1.6% (4/257) of postpartum disease in this invasive GAS infection database. Patients presented a median of 4 days (mean of 9 days) after delivery with signs and symptoms of infection. Three cases were complicated by bacteremia and one patient had streptococcal toxic shock syndrome. Each patient received multiple antibiotics and survived. No patients received intravenous immunoglobulin. For comparison, a secondary retrospective investigation of a large hospital discharge dataset obtained from the Florida Agency for Health Care Administration was assessed for patients with puerperal GAS infections. This method yielded an additional three cases, whose clinical and demographic characteristics were summarized. These data highlight that postpartum invasive GAS infection continues to complicate pregnancy, though the frequency has decreased markedly over the past century.
Vasoactive-Ventilation-Renal Score Predicts Cardiac Care Unit Length of Stay in Patients Undergoing Re-Entry Sternotomy: A Derivation Study  [PDF]
Vicki L. Mahan, Monika Gupta, Stephen Aronoff, David Bruni, Randy M. Stevens, Achintya Moulick
World Journal of Cardiovascular Surgery (WJCS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/wjcs.2018.81002
Abstract: Background: The vasoactive-ventilation-renal (VVR) score includes pulmonary and renal dysfunctions not previously addressed by the vasoactive inotrope score (VIS) and may be a better predictor of cardiac care unit (CCU) length of stay (LOS) in patients undergoing re-entry sternotomy (defined as no earlier than 30 days after previous sternotomy) for congenital heart disease (CHD). Methods: Patients undergoing re-entry sternotomy for CHD from August 1, 2009 to June 30, 2016 were studied retrospectively. A total of 96 patients undergoing 133 re-entry procedures were identified. VVR scores were calculated on CCU admission post-procedure (at 0 hour), 24-hour, and 48-hour after admission to the CCU. The response variable was CCU LOS.? Recursive partition analysis identified variables predicting LOS. Results: 133 re-entry sternotomies in 96 patients made up the samples of the database; 11 samples were removed due to incomplete data or placement on ECMO. Of the initial 25 features, 5 were removed for near zero variance and 3 categorical features were removed for non-information. Covariance analysis did not demonstrate any significant correlation amongst the remaining features. Initial recursive tree regression using ANOVA, cross validation and conditional predictive p-value (cp) = 0.01 produced 3 trees. The tree with lowest cross validation error was selected. The resulting 2 split trees with ventilator days less than 20 days and VVR score at 48 hours greater than 23 identified three CCU LOS groups with mean CCU LOS of 77.6, 55.1, and 9.5 days. Conclusions: Recursive partition analysis identified ventilator days greater than 20 days and the sub-population VVR at 48 hours as predictive of CCU LOS in
Species versus gene selection
SC Tsakas
Genetics Selection Evolution , 1989, DOI: 10.1186/1297-9686-21-3-247
Abstract:
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