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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 5126 matches for " Angela Trabucco "
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Concordato: ancora un privilegio per la Chiesa dopo la revisione del 1984 ? Premesse per una laicità “relativa” e “funzionale”
Daniele Trabucco
Stato, Chiese e Pluralismo Confessionale , 2011,
Abstract: Contributo segnalato dal Prof. Gabriele Leondini, ordinario di Istituzioni di diritto pubblico nell’Università di Padova. Sommario: 1. I privilegi della Ecclesia Christi – 2. Il “nuovo spirito” della pattuizione del 1984: la natura delle fonti interne attuative dei Patti e delle “intese” e la riequilibrazione della giurisprudenza costituzionale. I rischi di una laicità “illuministica” – 3. La proposta di una laicità “relativa” e “funzionale”.
Building lease: a new financial opportunity for public infrastructures
Aldo Norsa,Dario Trabucco
Techne : Journal of Technology for Architecture and Environment , 2012,
Abstract: The building lease is a new tool available to the government to finance public ‘cold’ infrastructures which allows to spread the investment over several years. Some major projects have recently been funded with this solution which can be used for both new works and for interventions on the existing buildings. The use of the building lease on existing assets (such as renovations or restorations), however, is still very rare, because of the need to sale and lease back the building concerned.
Hyperalgesic activity of kisspeptin in mice
Simona Spampinato, Angela Trabucco, Antonella Biasiotta, Francesca Biagioni, Giorgio Cruccu, Agata Copani, William H Colledge, Maria Sortino, Ferdinando Nicoletti, Santina Chiechio
Molecular Pain , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1744-8069-7-90
Abstract: Immunofluorescent staining in the mouse skin showed the presence of GPR54 receptors in PGP9.5-positive sensory fibers. Intraplantar injection of kisspeptin (1 or 3 nmol/5 μl) induced a small nocifensive response in naive mice, and lowered thermal pain threshold in the hot plate test. Both intraplantar and intrathecal (0.5 or 1 nmol/3 μl) injection of kisspeptin caused hyperalgesia in the first and second phases of the formalin test, whereas the GPR54 antagonist, p234 (0.1 or 1 nmol), caused a robust analgesia. Intraplantar injection of kisspeptin combined with formalin enhanced TRPV1 phosphorylation at Ser800 at the injection site, and increased ERK1/2 phosphorylation in the ipsilateral dorsal horn as compared to naive mice and mice treated with formalin alone.These data demonstrate for the first time that kisspeptin regulates pain sensitivity in rodents and suggest that peripheral GPR54 receptors could be targeted by novel drugs in the treatment of inflammatory pain.Kisspeptin is a 54-amino acid peptide originally discovered for its activity as metastasis-suppressor [1]. It is encoded by the Kiss1 gene as a 145-amino acid precursor protein and cleaved to a 54-amino acid protein as well as into shorter products (kisspeptin-10,-13,-14) known to play a critical role in the neuroendocrine regulation of reproduction [2-5].In the brain, kisspeptin is localized not only in areas involved in gonadotropin secretion, but also in other regions such as the amygdala, hippocampus, and the periacqueductal gray [6,7].Its action is mediated by a 7-TM receptor named GPR54, also known as KISS1R, which is coupled to polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis via a Gq/11 GTP binding protein [2,8].Loss-of-function mutations of GPR54 cause a non-Kallman variant of hypogonadotropic/hypogonadism in humans (i.e. hypogonadotropic/hypogonadism without anosmia) [2,9]. Interestingly, the expression of kisspeptin and GPR54 is not restricted to the hypothalamus. Relatively high levels of kisspeptin and GPR5
Bayesian models of thermal and pluviometric time series in the Fucino plateau
Adriana Trabucco,Federico M. Stefanini
Italian Journal of Agronomy , 2011, DOI: 10.4081/ija.2011.e29
Abstract: This work was developed within the Project Metodologie e sistemi integrati per la qualificazione di produzioni orticole del Fucino (Methodologies and integrated systems for the classification of horticultural products in the Fucino plateau), sponsored by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research, Strategic Projects, Law 448/97. Agro-system managing, especially if necessary to achieve high quality in speciality crops, requires knowledge of main features and intrinsic variability of climate. Statistical models may properly summarize the structure existing behind the observed variability, furthermore they may support the agronomic manager by providing the probability that meteorological events happen in a time window of interest. More than 30 years of daily values collected in four sites located on the Fucino plateau, Abruzzo region, Italy, were studied by fitting Bayesian generalized linear models to air temperature maximum /minimum and rainfall time series. Bayesian predictive distributions of climate variables supporting decision-making processes were calculated at different timescales, 5-days for temperatures and 10-days for rainfall, both to reduce computational efforts and to simplify statistical model assumptions. Technicians and field operators, even with limited statistical training, may exploit the model output by inspecting graphs and climatic profiles of the cultivated areas during decision-making processes. Realizations taken from predictive distributions may also be used as input for agro-ecological models (e.g. models of crop growth, water balance). Fitted models may be exploited to monitor climatic changes and to revise climatic profiles of interest areas, periodically updating the probability distributions of target climatic variables. For the sake of brevity, the description of results is limited to just one of the four sites, and results for all other sites are available as supplementary information.
Women entrepreneurship in Romania
Angela ON
Revista Romana de Economie , 2011,
Abstract: Considering entrepreneurship the domain with the greatest potential for creativity and innovation, any investigation on this field is recommended, in order to reveal new aspects that can influence the small enterprises development. From this point of view, female entrepreneurship represents an important source of innovation, only partially exploited or even forgotten.
Genetic Analysis for Two Italian Siblings with Usher Syndrome and Schizophrenia
Daniela Domanico,Serena Fragiotta,Paolo Trabucco,Marcella Nebbioso,Enzo Maria Vingolo
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/380863
Abstract: Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and sometimes vestibular areflexia. The relationship between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly a “schizophrenia-like” psychosis, is sometimes described in the literature. The etiology of psychiatric expression of Usher syndrome is still unclear. We reported a case of two natural siblings with congenital hypoacusis, retinitis pigmentosa, and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical features and genetic analysis were also reported. We analyzed possible causes to explain the high prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in Usher syndrome: genetic factors, brain damage, and “stress-related” hypothesis.
Genetic Analysis for Two Italian Siblings with Usher Syndrome and Schizophrenia
Daniela Domanico,Serena Fragiotta,Paolo Trabucco,Marcella Nebbioso,Enzo Maria Vingolo
Case Reports in Ophthalmological Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/380863
Abstract: Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive genetic disorders characterized by deafness, retinitis pigmentosa, and sometimes vestibular areflexia. The relationship between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly a “schizophrenia-like” psychosis, is sometimes described in the literature. The etiology of psychiatric expression of Usher syndrome is still unclear. We reported a case of two natural siblings with congenital hypoacusis, retinitis pigmentosa, and psychiatric symptoms. Clinical features and genetic analysis were also reported. We analyzed possible causes to explain the high prevalence of psychiatric manifestations in Usher syndrome: genetic factors, brain damage, and “stress-related” hypothesis. 1. Introduction Usher syndrome represents a group of clinically variable and genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by congenital sensorineural hearing loss, retinitis pigmentosa (RP), and sometimes vestibular areflexia [1]. Three clinical subtypes of Usher syndrome were recognized. Type I (USH1) is characterized by profound congenital deafness, prepubertal-onset retinitis pigmentosa, and vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome type II (USH2) is characterized by congenital mild to severe hearing loss, adolescent-onset retinitis pigmentosa, and no vestibular dysfunction. Usher syndrome type III (USH3) is characterized by rapidly progressive hearing loss. Age of onset of retinitis pigmentosa and degree of vestibular dysfunction are variable [2, 3]. To date, seven loci (USH1B-USH1H) and five genes for USH1 have been reported: USH1C, MYO7A, CDH23, PCDH15, and USH1G. Three genetic loci (USH2A, USH2C, and USH2D) and three genes (USH2A, GPR98, and DFNB31) have been identified in USH2. Mutations in USH2A gene on chromosome 1q41 are the most common mutations (85% of all cases with USH2). USH3 is caused by mutations in USH3A (clarin-1) gene, mapped on 3q21-q25 [4, 5]. Previous studies reported association between Usher syndrome and mental disorders, most commonly schizophrenia. Although Hallgren reported a prevalence of about 23% of psychotic disorders in individuals with Usher syndrome, other authors reported a prevalence of schizophrenia of only 4.5% [6, 7]. In addition, Dammeyer reported that 23% of individuals with Usher syndrome were affected by mental and behavioral disorders (such as mental retardation, anorexia nervosa, and ADHD) [8]. Case 1. A 26-year-old Caucasian female, born through an eutocic uncomplicated delivery, was first admitted to our department at the age of 23 complaining of gradual vision loss and hemeralopia in the
Impact of Simulated Airborne Soot on Maize Growth and Development  [PDF]
Angela Anda, Berndett Illes
Journal of Environmental Protection (JEP) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/jep.2012.38092
Abstract: Various effects of the dry deposition of soot on maize were investigated in Keszthely (Hungary) in two consecutive years. In order to be able to study a wider range of weather conditions, some of the plants were placed in a Thornthwaite-Matter type evapotranspirometer and given ad libitum water supplies. Pollution with airborne black carbon was simulated throughout the season by distributing rates of 3 g?m–2 a week using a motorised dust sprayer. Among the plant growth parameters, the leaf area index was increased by 3% - 14%, depending on the year, suggesting that the plants were able to absorb the carbon settling on the leaves. The black carbon reduced the albedo of the canopy by 17.5% - 21.8%, depending on the year, forcing the polluted maize to absorb more energy. Part of this surplus energy was utilised for increased evapotranspiration (3.9% and 11% in the two years) and to raise the surface temperature of the canopy by 1℃ - 2℃ during the mid-day hours. The effect of the contamination on maize was more intense in the hot, dry year. The unfavourable effect of soot on maize fertilisation could be observed as a significant increase in the number of deformed ears, leading to a reduction in grain dry matter. The reduction in dry matter yield for polluted maize grown with irrigation in the evapotranspirometer was far less severe than that on non-irrigated plots, suggesting that irrigation was the most obvious solution for mitigating the negative effects of contamination with airborne soot.
Current Attitudes of Anesthesiologists towards Medically Futile Care  [PDF]
Angela Saettele,Joseph Kras
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.34048
Abstract: Purpose: To explore anesthesiologists’ perceptions of the reasons underlying why physicians continue to provide care that they consider futile. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted utilizing a grounded theory approach. Four separate focus groups (2 resident physician groups and 2 attending physician groups) were conducted over a three week span. An interview guide was used consisting of a proposed definition of futility and five open-ended questions. Responses to the five open-ended questions were used to guide follow up questions. Transcribed audio recordings were then analyzed. Results: With data reduction, we were able to separate responses into definitions of futility, stories of cases where futile care was provided, and opinions as to the underlying causes of continuing to provide futile care. A variety of opinions was obtained, suggesting the possibility that different groups (surgeons, anesthesiologists, family members) view questions of futility differently. Conclusions: Complete agreement on a definition of futility does not exist. Even when some agreement exists, there is great difficulty in predicting outcomes in individual cases. Future quantitative studies may provide more evidence of trends in underlying reasons for providing futile care. Focused education efforts may then lead to more agreement between all involved.
Current Attitudes of Anesthesiologists towards Medically Futile Care  [PDF]
Angela Saettele, Joseph Kras
Open Journal of Anesthesiology (OJAnes) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojanes.2013.34048
Abstract:

Purpose: To explore anesthesiologists’ perceptions of the reasons underlying why physicians continue to provide care that they consider futile. Methods: A qualitative study was conducted utilizing a grounded theory approach. Four separate focus groups (2 resident physician groups and 2 attending physician groups) were conducted over a three week span. An interview guide was used consisting of a proposed definition of futility and five open-ended questions. Responses to the five open-ended questions were used to guide follow up questions. Transcribed audio recordings were then analyzed. Results: With data reduction, we were able to separate responses into definitions of futility, stories of cases where futile care was provided, and opinions as to the underlying causes of continuing to provide futile care. A variety of opinions was obtained, suggesting the possibility that different groups (surgeons, anesthesiologists, family members) view questions of futility differently. Conclusions: Complete agreement on a definition of futility does not exist. Even when some agreement exists, there is great difficulty in predicting outcomes in individual cases. Future quantitative studies may provide more evidence of trends in underlying reasons for providing futile care. Focused education efforts may then lead to more agreement between all

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