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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 17290 matches for " Andrew Cave "
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A Case Study on Logical Relations using Contextual Types
Andrew Cave,Brigitte Pientka
Computer Science , 2015, DOI: 10.4204/EPTCS.185.3
Abstract: Proofs by logical relations play a key role to establish rich properties such as normalization or contextual equivalence. They are also challenging to mechanize. In this paper, we describe the completeness proof of algorithmic equality for simply typed lambda-terms by Crary where we reason about logically equivalent terms in the proof environment Beluga. There are three key aspects we rely upon: 1) we encode lambda-terms together with their operational semantics and algorithmic equality using higher-order abstract syntax 2) we directly encode the corresponding logical equivalence of well-typed lambda-terms using recursive types and higher-order functions 3) we exploit Beluga's support for contexts and the equational theory of simultaneous substitutions. This leads to a direct and compact mechanization, demonstrating Beluga's strength at formalizing logical relations proofs.
Narrative reflective practice in medical education for residents: composing shifting identities
Jean Clandinin, Marie Thérèse Cave, Andrew Cave
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S13241
Abstract: rrative reflective practice in medical education for residents: composing shifting identities Original Research (3828) Total Article Views Authors: Jean Clandinin, Marie Thérèse Cave, Andrew Cave Published Date December 2010 Volume 2011:2 Pages 1 - 7 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S13241 Jean Clandinin1, Marie Thérèse Cave2, Andrew Cave2 1Center for Research for Teacher Education and Development, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Abstract: As researchers note, medical educators need to create situations to work with physicians in training to help them attend to the development of their professional identities. While there is a call for such changes to be included in medical education, educational approaches that facilitate attention to the development of medical students' professional identities, that is, who they are and who they are becoming as physicians, are still under development. One pedagogical strategy involves narrative reflective practice as a way to develop physician identity. Using this approach, medical residents first write narrative accounts of their experiences with patients in what are called "parallel charts". They then engage in a collaborative narrative inquiry within a sustained inquiry group of other residents and two researcher/facilitators (one physician, one narrative researcher). Preliminary studies of this approach are underway. Drawing on the experiences of one medical resident in one such inquiry group, we show how this pedagogical strategy enables attending to physician identity making.
Narrative reflective practice in medical education for residents: composing shifting identities
Jean Clandinin,Marie Thérèse Cave,Andrew Cave
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2010,
Abstract: Jean Clandinin1, Marie Thérèse Cave2, Andrew Cave21Center for Research for Teacher Education and Development, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Department of Family Medicine, Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, CanadaAbstract: As researchers note, medical educators need to create situations to work with physicians in training to help them attend to the development of their professional identities. While there is a call for such changes to be included in medical education, educational approaches that facilitate attention to the development of medical students' professional identities, that is, who they are and who they are becoming as physicians, are still under development. One pedagogical strategy involves narrative reflective practice as a way to develop physician identity. Using this approach, medical residents first write narrative accounts of their experiences with patients in what are called "parallel charts". They then engage in a collaborative narrative inquiry within a sustained inquiry group of other residents and two researcher/facilitators (one physician, one narrative researcher). Preliminary studies of this approach are underway. Drawing on the experiences of one medical resident in one such inquiry group, we show how this pedagogical strategy enables attending to physician identity making.Keywords: physician identity formation, residency
Age and Ethnic Differences in Volumetric Breast Density in New Zealand Women: A Cross-Sectional Study
Lis Ellison-Loschmann, Fiona McKenzie, Ralph Highnam, Andrew Cave, Jenny Walker, Mona Jeffreys
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0070217
Abstract: Breast cancer incidence differs by ethnicity in New Zealand (NZ) with Māori (the indigenous people) women having the highest rates followed by Pakeha (people primarily of British/European descent), Pacific and Asian women, who experience the lowest rates. The reasons for these differences are unclear. Breast density, an important risk factor for breast cancer, has not previously been studied here. We used an automated system, Volpara?, to measure breast density volume from the medio-lateral oblique view of digital mammograms, by age (≤50 years and >50 years) and ethnicity (Pakeha/Māori/Pacific/Asian) using routine data from the national screening programme: age; x-ray system and mammography details for 3,091 Pakeha, 716 Māori, 170 Pacific and 662 Asian (total n = 4,239) women. Linear regression of the natural logarithm of absolute and percent density values was used, back-transformed and expressed as the ratio of the geometric means. Covariates were age, x-ray system and, for absolute density, the natural log of the volume of non-dense tissue (a proxy for body mass index). Median age for Pakeha women was 55 years; Māori 53 years; and Pacific and Asian women, 52 years. Compared to Pakeha women (reference), Māori had higher absolute volumetric density (1.09; 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 1.03–1.15) which remained following adjustment (1.06; 95% CI 1.01–1.12) and was stronger for older compared to younger Māori women. Asian women had the greatest risk of high percentage breast density (1.35; 95% CI 1.27–1.43) while Pacific women in both the ≤50 and >50 year age groups (0.78; 95% CI 0.66–0.92 and 0.81; 95% CI 0.71–0.93 respectively) had the lowest percentage breast density compared to Pakeha. As well as expected age differences, we found differential patterns of breast density by ethnicity consistent with ethnic differences seen in breast cancer risk. Breast density may be a contributing factor to NZ’s well-known, but poorly explained, inequalities in breast cancer incidence.
Paediatric amitriptyline overdose  [PDF]
Steve Doherty, Grant Cave, Martyn Harvey
Open Journal of Pediatrics (OJPed) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ojped.2012.22028
Abstract: We report a near fatal case of paediatric amitriptyline overdose including a series of ECGs demonstrating the effects of sodium bicarbonate therapy on cardio-toxicity. We briefly discuss the role of sodium to counteract the sodium channel blockade of tricyclic antidepressants and discuss the possible utility of lipid emulsion therapy in such cases.
Case report: successful lipid resuscitation in multi-drug overdose with predominant tricyclic antidepressant toxidrome
Martyn Harvey, Grant Cave
International Journal of Emergency Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1865-1380-5-8
Abstract: Therapeutic use of intravenous lipid emulsion (ILE) in the arrested patient secondary to lipophilic cardiotoxin overdose is increasingly reported, with numerous documented cases of successful resuscitation outcome [1,2]. Clinical experience with lipid rescue resuscitation, coupled with a dearth of reported adverse sequelae attributable to ILE administration, has more recently seen use of lipid emulsions extend beyond that of overt cardiac arrest to instances of lesser degrees of lipophilic-toxin-induced haemodynamic instability.Few data exist, however, to guide the physician contemplating ILE use in the deteriorating patient when multiple therapeutic options remain yet untried. Specifically, the role of ILE in hemodynamic instability secondary to tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) overdose has been the subject of few pre-clinical studies [3,4]. We report a case of multi-drug overdose with predominant TCA toxicity that exhibited ongoing hypotension after systemic alkalinisation, yet before infusion of vasopressor medications, which responded to ILE loading.A 51-year-old 75-kg man with a background history of ischaemic heart disease, chronic back pain, and depression ingested amitriptyline in excess of 43 mg/kg (> 65 × 50-mg tablets) and unknown quantities of quetiapine, citalopram, metoprolol, quinapril, and aspirin in a deliberate act of self-poisoning. At ambulance arrival (time approximately 40 min after ingestion) he was agitated and poorly co-operative, with a heart rate of 160 bpm and blood pressure 100/70. En route to hospital he became unresponsive and then suffered a generalised seizure, which was terminated with 4 mg intravenous midazolam. On arrival to our tertiary care facility (time 60 min following ingestion), the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score was three, temperature was 37.6°C, pupils were dilated (4 mm), heart rate was 150 beats per minute, blood pressure was 112/82 mmHg, and serum glucose 14.0 mmoll-1. A 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG; Figure 1) revealed
Comprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton
Cave AJ, Parameswaran L
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S18747
Abstract: mprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton Original Research (2698) Total Article Views Authors: Cave AJ, Parameswaran L Published Date May 2011 Volume 2011:2 Pages 127 - 138 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S18747 Andrew J Cave1, Lakshmi Parameswaran2 1Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, Ireland Introduction: The scope of practice by general practitioners and family physicians in North America has been changing over time. Are academic practices providing residents the same scope of practice as the urban practices into which they are going? Methods: A survey describing the activities and scope of general practice/family practice was constructed from the literature and checked with general practitioners/family physicians for face validity. It was administered by mail to academic family physicians at the University of Alberta Department of Family Medicine in Edmonton and to all practicing general practitioners/family physicians in the city and Capital Region around Edmonton. There was a response rate of 78% and 50.9%, respectively. Results: Academic physicians’ practices differed from those of their urban colleagues. The former were all certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, worked in group practices, and included more males and fewer immigrants. They worked as many hours, but did less clinical work than their urban colleagues. Even so, 25% did more than 40 hours of clinical work each week compared with 68% of urban physicians. There was a wide scope of services and procedures provided by both groups and other services that were different from group to group. There was no difference between groups in intention to add or remove services in the next two years, but academic physicians had removed more services in the last two years. Conclusion: General practitioners/family physicians still provide a wide range of services. Although both academic and urban general practitioners/family physicians have reduced some services in the last two years, they have both added others to their repertoire. Although the teaching and urban general practitioners/family physicians practices have many similarities, they also have differences, which may have implications for the training of future urban family physicians.
Comprehensiveness of care by family physicians in Edmonton
Cave AJ,Parameswaran L
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2011,
Abstract: Andrew J Cave1, Lakshmi Parameswaran21Department of Family Medicine, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Mater Misericordiae University Hospital, Dublin, IrelandIntroduction: The scope of practice by general practitioners and family physicians in North America has been changing over time. Are academic practices providing residents the same scope of practice as the urban practices into which they are going?Methods: A survey describing the activities and scope of general practice/family practice was constructed from the literature and checked with general practitioners/family physicians for face validity. It was administered by mail to academic family physicians at the University of Alberta Department of Family Medicine in Edmonton and to all practicing general practitioners/family physicians in the city and Capital Region around Edmonton. There was a response rate of 78% and 50.9%, respectively.Results: Academic physicians’ practices differed from those of their urban colleagues. The former were all certified by the College of Family Physicians of Canada, worked in group practices, and included more males and fewer immigrants. They worked as many hours, but did less clinical work than their urban colleagues. Even so, 25% did more than 40 hours of clinical work each week compared with 68% of urban physicians. There was a wide scope of services and procedures provided by both groups and other services that were different from group to group. There was no difference between groups in intention to add or remove services in the next two years, but academic physicians had removed more services in the last two years.Conclusion: General practitioners/family physicians still provide a wide range of services. Although both academic and urban general practitioners/family physicians have reduced some services in the last two years, they have both added others to their repertoire. Although the teaching and urban general practitioners/family physicians practices have many similarities, they also have differences, which may have implications for the training of future urban family physicians.Keywords: comprehensiveness, primary care, education
Hypothesis: the research page. Participatory action research.
Cave AJ,Ramsden VR
Canadian Family Physician , 2002,
Abstract:
Embeddings of locally compact hyperbolic groups into Lp-spaces
Dennis Dreesen,Chris Cave
Mathematics , 2013,
Abstract: In the last years, there has been a large amount of research on embeddability properties of finitely generated hyperbolic groups. In this paper, we elaborate on the more general class of locally compact hyperbolic groups. We compute the equivariant $L_p$-compression in a number of locally compact examples, such as the groups $SO(n,1)$: by proving that the equivariant $L_p$-compression of a locally compact compactly generated group is minimal for $p=2$, we calculate all equivariant $L_p$-compressions of $SO(n,1)$. Next, we show that although there are locally compact, non-discrete hyperbolic groups $G$ with Kazhdan's property ($T$), it is true that any locally compact hyperbolic group admits a proper affine isometric action on an $L_p$-space for $p$ larger than the Ahlfors regular conformal dimension of $\partial G$. This answers a question asked by Yves de Cornulier. Finally, we elaborate on the locally compact version of property $(A)$ and show that, as in the discrete case, a locally compact second countable group has property (A) if its non-equivariant compression is greater than 1/2.
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