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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 1735 matches for " Alison Laffan "
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A New Way of Measuring Openness: The Open Governance Index
Liz Laffan
Technology Innovation Management Review , 2012,
Abstract: Open source software is now "business as usual" in the mobile industry. While much attention is given to the importance of open source licenses, we argue in this article that the governance model can be as necessary to a project’s success and that projects vary widely in the governance models – whether open or closed – that they employ. Open source governance models describe the control points that are used to influence open source projects with regard to access to the source code, how the source code is developed, how derivatives are created, and the community structure of the project. Governance determines who has control over the project beyond what is deemed legally necessary via the open source licenses for that project. The purpose of our research is to define and measure the governance of open source projects, in other words, the extent to which decision-making in an open source project is "open" or "closed". We analyzed eight open source projects using 13 specific governance criteria across four areas of governance: access, development, derivatives and community. Our findings suggest that the most open platforms will be most successful in the long term, however we acknowledge exceptions to this rule. We also identify best practices that are common across these open source projects with regard to source code access, development of source code, management of derivatives, and community structure. These best practices increase the likelihood of developer use of and involvement in open source projects.
New charts for the Arabic ocean; Dictionaries as indicators of changing times
Michael Laffan
Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde , 2003,
Abstract:
Raden Aboe Bakar; An introductory note concerning Snouck Hurgronje's informant in Jeddah (1884-1912)
Michael Laffan
Bijdragen tot de Taal-, Land- en Volkenkunde , 1999,
Abstract:
The New Turn to Mecca Le nouveau tournant vers la Mecque : aper us sur les imprimés arabes et les réseaux soufis à Java à la fin du XIXe siècle.
Michael Laffan
Revue des Mondes Musulmans et de la Méditerranée , 2011, DOI: 10.4000/remmm.6022
Abstract: à partir des écrits de C.Snouck Hurgronje (1857-1936), cet article analyse les transformations des écoles islamiques de Java à la fin du XIXe siècle. Les notes de Snouck Hurgronje montrent une transition volontaire qui se traduit par le déclin des vieux manuscrits locaux et la diffusion d’ouvrages imprimés en arabe. Ce glissement s’est opéré conjointement à la popularité croissante de certaines confréries basées à la Mecque, plus particulièrement la Naqshbandiyya, qui ont adopté l’imprimerie pour la diffusion de leurs ouvrages. Je conclurai en suggérant qu’à long terme cette transition a permis l’arrivée d’un modernisme islamique dans les ports de l’archipel, auquel sera opposé l’islam décrit par Snouck Hurgronje, finalement considéré comme l’expression d’une tradition rurale et anti-moderne. Taking the extensive Java notebooks of Christiaan Snouck Hurgronje (1857-1936) as a lens, this essay discusses the globalising forms being adopted in Java’s Islamic schools in the late nineteenth century. Snouck Hurgronje’s notes reveal a self-conscious transition towards the consumption of printed Arabic sources away from the use of older indigenous manuscript glossings of the same corpus. This shift came in tandem with the rising popularity of certain Sufi brotherhoods headquartered at Mecca, most particularly the Naqshbandiyya, which readily adopted print for the dissemination of their litanies and manuals. I will close by suggesting that, in the long run, it was this shift that would make possible the later arrival of “Islamic modernism” in the ports of the archipelago, against which the Islam documented by Snouck Hurgronje would ultimately be juxtaposed as a rural, anti-modern, and “traditional” survival of past ages.
The European Union: A Distinctive Model of Internationalisation?
Brigid Laffan
European Integration Online Papers , 1997,
Abstract: This paper argues that the European Union has developed a distinctive form of internationalisation which represents a form of deep regionalism. The EU represents deep regionalism, in contrast to other regionalisms because of its scope, level of institutionalisation and normative underpinnings. Part two of the paper analyses the characteristics of political and economic order emerging in the Union. Four aspects of the Union are analysed: loosely coupled collective governance, market integration, polity building and the international role of the Union.
The European Union: A Distinctive Model of Internationalisation?
Brigid Laffan
European Integration Online Papers , 1997,
Abstract: This paper argues that the European Union has developed a distinctive form of internationalisation which represents a form of deep regionalism. The EU represents deep regionalism, in contrast to other regionalisms because of its scope, level of institutionalisation and normative underpinnings. Part two of the paper analyses the characteristics of political and economic order emerging in the Union. Four aspects of the Union are analysed: loosely coupled collective governance, market integration, polity building and the international role of the Union.
Functional Data Analysis of Multi-Angular Hyperspectral Data on Vegetation
Sugianto,Shawn Laffan
Aceh International Journal of Science and Technology , 2012,
Abstract: The surface reflectance anisotropy can be estimated by directional reflectance analysis through the collection of multi-angular spectral data. Proper characterization of the surface anisotropy is animportant element in the successful interpretation of remotely sensed signals. A signal received by a sensor from a vegetation canopy is affected by several factors. One of them is the sensor zenith angle.Functional data analysis can be used to assess the distribution and variation of spectral reflectance due to sensor zenith angle. This paper examines the effect of sensor zenith angles on the spectral reflectance of vegetation, example on cotton leaves. The spectra were acquired in a green house trial in order to address the question ‘how much information can be obtained from multi-angular hyperspectral remote sensing of vegetation?’ The goals of the functional data analysis applied in this paper is to examine the FunctionalData Analysis approach was applied to analysis multi-angular hyperspectral data on cotton, highlighting various characteristics of cotton spectra due to sensor view angles, and to infer directional variation in an outcome or dependent variable with different zenith angles
Sleep Disordered Breathing, Fatigue, and Sleepiness in HIV-Infected and -Uninfected Men
Susheel P. Patil, Todd T. Brown, Lisa P. Jacobson, Joseph B. Margolick, Alison Laffan, Lisette Johnson-Hill, Rebecca Godfrey, Jacquett Johnson, Sandra Reynolds, Alan R. Schwartz, Philip L. Smith
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0099258
Abstract: Study Objectives We investigated the association of HIV infection and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) with sleep disordered breathing (SDB), fatigue, and sleepiness. Methods HIV-uninfected men (HIV?; n = 60), HIV-infected men using HAART (HIV+/HAART+; n = 58), and HIV-infected men not using HAART (HIV+/HAART?; n = 41) recruited from two sites of the Multicenter AIDS cohort study (MACS) underwent a nocturnal sleep study, anthropometric assessment, and questionnaires for fatigue and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. The prevalence of SDB in HIV- men was compared to that in men matched from the Sleep Heart Health Study (SHHS). Results The prevalence of SDB was unexpectedly high in all groups: 86.7% for HIV?, 70.7% for HIV+/HAART+, and 73.2% for HIV+/HAART?, despite lower body-mass indices (BMI) in HIV+ groups. The higher prevalence in the HIV? men was significant in univariate analyses but not after adjustment for BMI and other variables. SDB was significantly more common in HIV? men in this study than those in SHHS, and was common in participants with BMIs <25 kg/m2. HIV+ men reported fatigue more frequently than HIV? men (25.5% vs. 6.7%; p = 0.003), but self-reported sleepiness did not differ among the three groups. Sleepiness, but not fatigue, was significantly associated with SDB. Conclusions SDB was highly prevalent in HIV? and HIV+ men, despite a normal or slightly elevated BMI. The high rate of SDB in men who have sex with men deserves further investigation. Sleepiness, but not fatigue, was related to the presence of SDB. Clinicians caring for HIV-infected patients should distinguish between fatigue and sleepiness when considering those at risk for SDB, especially in non-obese men.
A Case Study of Water Education in Australia  [PDF]
Alison J. Sammel
Creative Education (CE) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.513129
Abstract:

What does it mean to be scientifically literate in relation to water? Is this understanding the same for water literacy? And what implications do these two concepts have for water education in Australia? In addressing these questions, this paper provides a snapshot of the similar and competing educational ideologies that underpin the concepts of scientific literacy in relation to water, and water literacy. An investigation of the Australian Curriculum (Science), and a small case study of pre-service education students highlight the degree to which one concept is favored over the other. This bias ultimately raises questions for water education in Australia, as it is not about whether the ACS or [future] teachers should be addressing issues associated with water, but rather how and to what end goal. This necessitates exploring the partial and political nature of any approach to educating about water, and highlights that not all approaches are equally as politically neutral or challenging.

Science as a Human Endeavour: Outlining Scientific Literacy and Rethinking Why We Teach Science  [PDF]
Alison J. Sammel
Creative Education (CE) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ce.2014.510098
Abstract: What does it mean to be scientifically literate? Historically, dominant understandings of scientific literacy focus on science content acquisition. However, new understandings imply more genuine and authentic interactivity between science content knowledge/skills and understanding of the economic, sociocultural, religious, ecological, ideological, political and temporal connections upon which the science is based: this is the task of Science as a Human Endeavour. This paper presents a snapshot of what Science as a Human Endeavour is, its purpose and factors to consider. Science as a Human Endeavour doesn’t just necessitate that we change our teaching practices: it forces us to rethink the teaching and learning of science and the reason why we are doing it.


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