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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 3267 matches for " Aline;Diamond "
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A relevancia das células natural killer (NK) e killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) no transplante de células-tronco hematopoéticas (TCTH)
Almeida-Oliveira, Aline;Diamond, Hilda R.;
Revista Brasileira de Hematologia e Hemoterapia , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1516-84842008000400017
Abstract: natural killer (nk) cells were identified over 30 years ago by their ability to kill cancer and virally infected cells without prior sensitization. for years the recognition mechanisms of target cells were unknown, until the 1990s when the "missing-self" hypothesis was proposed. according to this theory, although tolerant to normal autologous cells, nk cells can recognize and attack cells that have down-regulated human leukocyte antigen (hla) class i molecules. the discovery of killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (kir) that specifically recognize hla class i molecules corroborated this hypothesis. these new concepts point to the importance of studying kir in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (hsct). hla disparities between the donor and patient in hsct may be distinguished by nk cells leading to alloreactivity. even though there are some promising results, until now existing studies have not reached any consensus. here, we will review the relevance of nk cells and kir in the different types of hsc.
Correction for false statement
Milton Diamond
International Journal of Pediatric Endocrinology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1687-9856-2012-1
Abstract: A false statement has been published in your journal in an article by P. A. Lee and C. P. Houk. (2010) Article ID 563640. "The Role of Support Groups, Advocacy Groups, and Other Interested Parties in Improving the Care of Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Pleas and Warnings [1]."These authors say "Confrontational tactics used by "advocacy" groups have included pressuring the medical community to adopt narrow mandates, such as a moratorium on all reproductive system surgery (six), that cannot apply to the broad range of situations encountered in practice or the use of accusations regarding therapy received by patients in the past."In support of their argument they cite our paper (M. Diamond & H. K. Sigmundson, Management of intersexuality. Guidelines for dealing with persons with ambiguous genitalia. Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine. 1997;151(10):1046-1050 [2]. We have been wrongly quoted and cited.Here is exactly what we say:"Perform no major surgery for cosmetic reasons alone; only for conditions related to physical/medical health. This will entail a great deal of explanation needed for the parents who will want their children to "look normal." Explain to them that appearances during childhood, while not typical of other children, may be of less importance than functionality and post pubertal erotic sensitivity of the genitalia. Surgery can potentially impair sexual/erotic function. Therefore such surgery, which includes all clitoral surgery and any sex reassignment, should typically wait until puberty or after when the patient is able to give truly informed consent." [emphasis added].Our emphasis was on cosmetic surgery and since our statement no evidence has shown any surgery had been of benefit. Many unneeded surgeries have been devastating.Significantly damaging were those surgeries imposed on males that were sex reassigned for different reasons. Often these were instances where the penis was considered too small for appropriate male sta
Croyance, compréhension et incompréhension : Wittgenstein et la religion
Cora Diamond
ThéoRèmes : Enjeux des Approches Empiriques des Religions , 2011, DOI: 10.4000/theoremes.242
Abstract: Wittgenstein avait, pourrait-on dire, une sensibilité religieuse . Dans un essai vaste et perspicace sur Wittgenstein et la religion, Peter Winch a décrit l’attitude de Wittgenstein à l’égard de la vie ainsi que son regard sur sa propre vie d’une fa on qui met en lumière leur caractère religieux [Winch 1994, p. 109-110]. Mais il n’est pas aisé de voir clairement quelles furent les opinions de Wittgenstein au sujet de la religion et de la croyance religieuse, opinions qui, de fait, changère...
Privatization of Social Security: Lessons from Chile Privatization of Social Security: Lessons from Chile
Peter Diamond
Revista de Análisis Económico (RAE) , 1994,
Abstract: In Chile, all covered workers must save 10% of monthly earnings wilh a highly regulated intermediary Ihat monages a single fund and provides survivors and disability insurance. Workers pay a commission charge, in addition to the mandatory 10%, to finance this insurance and to cover the costs and profits of the intermediaries. On becoming eligible to receive benefits, a worker can choose between a sequence of phased withdrawals and a real annuity. In addition, there is a sizable guaranteed minimum pension. Unlike the purchased annuities, the minimum pension is not indexed, but adjusted by Ihe government from time to time. The Chilean reform gets high marks for defending the system from polilical risk and for its effects on capital accumulation and on the functioning of the capital markel. The Chilean reform gets low marks for the provision of insurance and for administrative cost. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the Chilean reform is the high cost of running a privatized social security system, higher than the "inefficient" system thal it replaced. Valdes-Prieto has estimated that the average administrative charge per effective affiliate while active is 2.94% of average taxable earnings. This is close to 30% of the 10% mandatory saving rate. The cost per person is not far from costs observed in older privately-managed pension systems. However, it is higher than administrative cost in well-run unified government-managed systems. The issue here is the administrative efficiency of the primte markel, not anything particularly costly about the Chilean system. In Chile, all covered workers must save 10% of monthly earnings wilh a highly regulated intermediary Ihat monages a single fund and provides survivors and disability insurance. Workers pay a commission charge, in addition to the mandatory 10%, to finance this insurance and to cover the costs and profits of the intermediaries. On becoming eligible to receive benefits, a worker can choose between a sequence of phased withdrawals and a real annuity. In addition, there is a sizable guaranteed minimum pension. Unlike the purchased annuities, the minimum pension is not indexed, but adjusted by Ihe government from time to time. The Chilean reform gets high marks for defending the system from polilical risk and for its effects on capital accumulation and on the functioning of the capital markel. The Chilean reform gets low marks for the provision of insurance and for administrative cost. Perhaps the most surprising aspect of the Chilean reform is the high cost of running a privatized social security system
Against The Declining Significance of Race
Andrew Diamond
Transatlantica : Revue d'études Américaines , 2009,
Abstract: The Rising Significance of ClassRe-examining William Julius Wilson’s landmark study, The Declining Significance of Race today, in a moment quite distant from the book’s release context some thirty years ago, it is difficult to understand how this rather brief treatise on “race and class in the American experience” could have played a key role in transforming the research agenda of a generation of scholars working on the history of African Americans in the United States. The book relies almost...
ADRB2, ADRB3, BDKRB2 and MTNR1B Genes Related to Body fat Modulation and Its Interaction with Physical Activity and Blood Pressure  [PDF]
Aline Marcadenti
Open Journal of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases (OJEMD) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojemd.2015.57012
Abstract: Hypertension (HTN) is the risk factor that most contributes to mortality rates in the world, followed by physical inactivity and obesity. Despite the influence of genetic factors on the genesis of HTN, blood pressure levels are strongly influenced by environmental factors such as physical inactivity and overweight, characterizing it as a polygenic disease. Genetic components and environmental factors such as physical exercise may modulate the phenotype of individuals predisposed to medical conditions such as HTN, independently of modifiable factors such as increased levels of adiposity; however, studies have shown that polymorphic forms detected in genes involved in the mechanisms of blood pressure regulation and also related to body fat modulation may interact with physical activity levels and HTN. The aim of this article is to review the interactions between polymorphisms in ADRB2, ADRB3, BDKRB2 and MTNR1B genes, physical activity and blood pressure.
A History of the Urban Underground Tunnel (4000 B.C.E. - 1900 C.E.)  [PDF]
Robert Steven Diamond, Brian Garret Kassel
Journal of Transportation Technologies (JTTs) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jtts.2018.81002
Abstract: Generally hidden from public view, out of our daily thoughts, and literally under our feet, are myriad urban underground tunnels that make our modern megacities possible. From their ancient beginnings in antiquity, as a means of supplying fresh water and draining waste water from cities, underground tunnels evolved into a means of providing high capacity rail mass transit in our most densely populated urban centers. This paper provides a broad overview of the evolution of urban tunnels across a 6000 year time span and includes the specific engineering formulas/computations for the earliest 19th century subways/infrastructure projects based on the Roman vaulted arch tunnel.
Virus and Host Determinants of West Nile Virus Pathogenesis
Michael S. Diamond
PLOS Pathogens , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1000452
Abstract:
Development of a reliable and construct valid measure of nutritional literacy in adults
James J Diamond
Nutrition Journal , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1475-2891-6-5
Abstract: In order to assess the internal consistency and construct validity of the NLS, demographic data, readability statistics, NLS scores and scores on the Reading Comprehension Section of the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA) were collected in a cross-sectional study of 341 patients from two primary care practices.The NLS score showed acceptable internal consistency of 0.84 by Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The Pearson correlation between the NLS and the S-TOFHLA was 0.61, supporting evidence for construct validity.Given the importance of proper weight and nutrition in the health of the public, as well as the absence of research on literacy skills as related to nutritional concepts, the NLS has the potential to add to the national research agenda in these areas.While there has been a decrease in mortality from cardiovascular diseases in the United States dating back at least 40 years, there have been increases in the prevalence of diabetes and obesity, both of which pose significant cardiovascular risks [1]. The CDC estimates the prevalence of diabetes (diagnosed plus undiagnosed) in 2002 at more than 8% of the population older than 19 and more than double that for people over 64 [2]. That obesity is increasing is also well-documented, and is now estimated at approximately one-third of the US population ages 20 to 74 [3].The increased prevalence of obesity and Type 2 diabetes has been found to relate to poor dietary patterns and inadequate exercise. The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) has clearly shown that a lifestyle intervention centering on diet and exercise can reduce the likelihood of the onset of Type 2 diabetes [4].Given the rising prevalence of conditions such as diabetes and obesity, plus the role of nutrition and diet in their etiology, understanding whether the ability to comprehend nutritional information contributes to health status is highly significant. Furthermore, better understanding of the factors leading to poor dietary a
Response of the brain to enrichment
DIAMOND, MARIAN C.;
Anais da Academia Brasileira de Ciências , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S0001-37652001000200006
Abstract: before 1960, the brain was considered by scientists to be immutable, subject only to genetic control. in the early sixties, however, investigators were seriously speculating that environmental influences might be capable of altering brain structure. by 1964, two research laboratories proved that the morphology and chemistry or physiology of the brain could be experientially altered (bennett et al. 1964, hubel and wiesel 1965). since then, the capacity of the brain to respond to environmental input, specifically "enrichment,'' has become an accepted fact among neuroscientists, educators and others. in fact, the demonstration that environmental enrichment can modify structural components of the rat brain at any age altered prevailing presumptions about the brain's plasticity (diamond et al. 1964, diamond 1988). the cerebral cortex, the area associated with higher cognitive processing, is more receptive than other parts of the brain to environmental enrichment. the message is clear: although the brain possesses a relatively constant macrostructural organization, the ever-changing cerebral cortex, with its complex microarchitecture of unknown potential, is powerfully shaped by experiences before birth, during youth and, in fact, throughout life. it is essential to note that enrichment effects on the brain have consequences on behavior. parents, educators, policy makers, and individuals can all benefit from such knowledge.
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