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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 324831 matches for " Aldekhayel S "
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Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia
Alkhayal A,Aldhukair S,Alselaim N,Aldekhayel S
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012,
Abstract: Abdullah Alkhayal,1 Shahla Aldhukair,2 Nahar Alselaim,1 Salah Aldekhayel,1 Sultan Alhabdan,1 Waleed Altaweel,3 Mohi Elden Magzoub,4 Mohammed Zamakhshary1,21Department of Surgery, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Public Health Section, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Urology Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Medical Education, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaBackground: After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors’ perspective, and program directors’ attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills.Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs). The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs’ perspective and the PDs’ attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated.Results: Seventy-one (61%) participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative evaluation, whereas 15% perform only formative evaluations of their residents, and the remaining 22% conduct both summative and formative evaluations of their residents’ technical skills. Operative portfolios are kept by 53% of programs. The percentage of programs with mechanisms for remediation is 29% (19 of 65).Conclusion: The survey showed that surgical training programs use different tools to assess surgical skills competency. Having a clear remediation mechanism was highly associated with reporting remediation, which reflects the capability to detect struggling residents. Surgical training leadership should invest more in
Toward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia
Alkhayal A, Aldhukair S, Alselaim N, Aldekhayel S, Alhabdan S, Altaweel W, Magzoub ME, Zamakhshary M
Advances in Medical Education and Practice , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S31720
Abstract: ward an objective assessment of technical skills: a national survey of surgical program directors in Saudi Arabia Original Research (865) Total Article Views Authors: Alkhayal A, Aldhukair S, Alselaim N, Aldekhayel S, Alhabdan S, Altaweel W, Magzoub ME, Zamakhshary M Published Date October 2012 Volume 2012:3 Pages 97 - 104 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/AMEP.S31720 Received: 12 March 2012 Accepted: 02 April 2012 Published: 10 October 2012 Abdullah Alkhayal,1 Shahla Aldhukair,2 Nahar Alselaim,1 Salah Aldekhayel,1 Sultan Alhabdan,1 Waleed Altaweel,3 Mohi Elden Magzoub,4 Mohammed Zamakhshary1,2 1Department of Surgery, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 2Public Health Section, King Abdullah International Medical Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 3Urology Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Center, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Medical Education, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia Background: After almost a decade of implementing competency-based programs in postgraduate training programs, the assessment of technical skills remains more subjective than objective. National data on the assessment of technical skills during surgical training are lacking. We conducted this study to document the assessment tools for technical skills currently used in different surgical specialties, their relationship with remediation, the recommended tools from the program directors’ perspective, and program directors’ attitudes toward the available objective tools to assess technical skills. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey of surgical program directors (PDs). The survey was initially developed using a focus group and was then sent to 116 PDs. The survey contains demographic information about the program, the objective assessment tools used, and the reason for not using assessment tools. The last section discusses the recommended tools to be used from the PDs’ perspective and the PDs’ attitude and motivation to apply these tools in each program. The associations between the responses to the assessment questions and remediation were statistically evaluated. Results: Seventy-one (61%) participants responded. Of the respondents, 59% mentioned using only nonstandardized, subjective, direct observation for technical skills assessment. Sixty percent use only summative evaluation, whereas 15% perform only formative evaluations of their residents, and the remaining 22% conduct both summative and formative evaluations of their residents’ technical skills. Operative portfolios are kept by 53% of programs. The percentage of programs with mechanisms for remediation is 29% (19 of 65). Conclusion: The survey showed that surgical training programs use different tools to assess surgical skills competency. Having a clear remediation mechanism was highly associated with reporting remediation, which reflects the capability to detect struggling residents. Surg
Constructing a question bank based on script concordance approach as a novel assessment methodology in surgical education
Aldekhayel Salah A,ALselaim Nahar A,Magzoub Mohi,AL-Qattan Mohammad M
BMC Medical Education , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6920-12-100
Abstract: Background Script Concordance Test (SCT) is a new assessment tool that reliably assesses clinical reasoning skills. Previous descriptions of developing SCT-question banks were merely subjective. This study addresses two gaps in the literature: 1) conducting the first phase of a multistep validation process of SCT in Plastic Surgery, and 2) providing an objective methodology to construct a question bank based on SCT. Methods After developing a test blueprint, 52 test items were written. Five validation questions were developed and a validation survey was established online. Seven reviewers were asked to answer this survey. They were recruited from two countries, Saudi Arabia and Canada, to improve the test’s external validity. Their ratings were transformed into percentages. Analysis was performed to compare reviewers’ ratings by looking at correlations, ranges, means, medians, and overall scores. Results Scores of reviewers’ ratings were between 76% and 95% (mean 86% ± 5). We found poor correlations between reviewers (Pearson’s: +0.38 to 0.22). Ratings of individual validation questions ranged between 0 and 4 (on a scale 1–5). Means and medians of these ranges were computed for each test item (mean: 0.8 to 2.4; median: 1 to 3). A subset of test items comprising 27 items was generated based on a set of inclusion and exclusion criteria. Conclusion This study proposes an objective methodology for validation of SCT-question bank. Analysis of validation survey is done from all angles, i.e., reviewers, validation questions, and test items. Finally, a subset of test items is generated based on a set of criteria.
Degree Splitting of Root Square Mean Graphs  [PDF]
S. S. Sandhya, S. Somasundaram, S. Anusa
Applied Mathematics (AM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/am.2015.66086
Abstract: Let \"\" be an injective function. For a vertex labeling f, the induced edge labeling \"\" is defined by, \"\" or \"\"; then, the edge labels are distinct and are from \"\". Then f is called a root square mean labeling of G. In this paper, we prove root square mean labeling of some degree splitting graphs.
A Parameter Estimation Model of G-CSF: Mathematical Model of Cyclical Neutropenia  [PDF]
S. Balamuralitharan, S. Rajasekaran
American Journal of Computational Mathematics (AJCM) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ajcm.2012.21002
Abstract: We investigate the FFT (Fast Fourier Transform) model and G-CSF (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor) treatment of CN (Cyclical Neutropenia). We collect grey collies and normal dog’s data from CN and analyze the G-CSF treatment. The model develops the dynamics of circulating blood cells before and after the G-CSF treatment. This is quite natural and useful for the collection of laboratory data for investigation. The proposed interventions are practical. This reduces the quantity of G-CSF required for potential maintenance. This model gives us good result in treatment. The changes would be practical and reduce the risk side as well as the cost of treatment in G-CSF.
Synthesis, Thermal Behaviour, XRD, and Luminescent Properties of Lighter Lanthanidethiodipropionate Hydrates Containing Aminogunidine as Neutral Ligand  [PDF]
S. Packiaraj, S. Govindarajan
Open Journal of Inorganic Chemistry (OJIC) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojic.2014.43006
Abstract:
Aminoguanidine lanthanide thiodipropionate hydrates of composition [Ln(Agun)2(tdp)3·nH2O], Agun = Aminoguanidine, tdp = thiodipropionic acid, where Ln = La, Pr, Nd and Sm if n = 2, have been prepared and characterized by physic-chemical techniques.
Calculation of the Fine-Structure Constant  [PDF]
Jesús Sánchez
Journal of High Energy Physics, Gravitation and Cosmology (JHEPGC) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jhepgc.2018.43029
Abstract: The fine-structure constant α [1] is a constant in physics that plays a fundamental role in the electromagnetic interaction. It is a dimensionless constant, defined as: \"\" (1) being q the elementary charge, ε0 the vacuum permittivity, h the Planck constant and c the speed of light in vacuum. The value shown in (1) is according CODATA 2014 [2]. In this paper, it will be explained that the fine-structure constant is one of the roots of the following equation: \"\" (2) being e the mathematical constant e (the base of the natural logarithm). One of the solutions of this equation is: \"\" (3) This means that it is equal to the CODATA value in nine decimal digits (or the seven most significant ones if you prefer). And therefore, the difference between both values is: \"\" (4) This coincidence is higher in orders of magnitude than the commonly accepted necessary to validate a theory towards experimentation. As the cosine function is periodical, the Equation (2) has infinite roots and could seem the coincidence is just by chance. But as it will be shown in the paper, the separation among the different solutions is sufficiently high to disregard this possibility. It will also be shown that another elegant way to show Equation (2) is the following (being i the imaginary unit): \"\" (5) having of course the same root (3). The possible meaning of this other representation (5) will be explained.
How to Check If a Number Is Prime Using a Finite Definite Integral  [PDF]
Jesús Sánchez
Journal of Applied Mathematics and Physics (JAMP) , 2019, DOI: 10.4236/jamp.2019.72028
Abstract: In the history of mathematics different methods have been used to detect if a number is prime or not. In this paper a new one will be shown. It will be demonstrated that if the following equation is zero for a certain number p, this number p would be prime. And being m an integer number higher than (the lowest, the most efficient the operation). \"\" . If the result is an integer, this result will tell us how many permutations of two divisors, the input number has. As you can check, no recurrent division by odd or prime numbers is done, to check if the number is prime or has divisors. To get to this point, we will do the following. First, we will create a domain with all the composite numbers. This is easy, as you can just multiply one by one all the integers (greater or equal than 2) in that domain. So, you will get all the composite numbers (not getting any prime) in that domain. Then, we will use the Fourier transform to change from this original domain (called discrete time domain in this regards) to the frequency domain. There, we can check, using Parseval’s theorem, if a certain number is there or not. The use of Parseval’s theorem leads to the above integral. If the number p that we want to check is not in the domain, the result of the integral is zero and the number is a prime. If instead, the result is an integer, this integer will tell us how many permutations of two divisors the number p has. And, in consequence information how many factors, the number p has. So, for any number p lower than 2m?- 1, you can check if it is prime or not, just making the numerical definite integration. We will apply this integral in a computer program to check the efficiency of the operation. We will check, if no further developments are done, the numerical integration is inefficient computing-wise compared with brute-force checking. To be added, is the question regarding the level of accuracy needed (number of decimals and number of steps in the numerical integration) to have a reliable result for large numbers. This will be commented on the paper, but a separate study will be needed to have detailed conclusions. Of course,
Bir Bibliyografik Kontrol Merkezi Yay nlar : al ma ekli ve Sat Metodu
?. S.
Türk Kütüphanecili?i , 1967,
Abstract:
Rain Attenuation at Terahertz  [PDF]
S. Ishii
Wireless Engineering and Technology (WET) , 2010, DOI: 10.4236/wet.2010.12014
Abstract: Rain attenuation values were calculated using empirical raindrop-size distributions, which were, Marshall-Palmer (M-P), Best, Polyakova-Shifrin (P-S) and Weibull raindrop-size distributions, and also calculated using a specific rain attenuation model for prediction methods recommended by ITU-R. Measurements of Terahertz wave taken at 313 GHz (0.96 mm) were compared with our calculations. Results showed that the propagation experiment was in very good agreement with a calculation from the specific attenuation model for use in prediction methods by ITU-R.
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