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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 9386 matches for " Ahmed BaHammam "
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Sleep medicine in Saudi Arabia: Current problems and future challenges
BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Thoracic Medicine , 2011,
Abstract: Sleep medicine is a relatively new specialty in the medical community. The practice of sleep medicine in Saudi Arabia (KSA) began in the mid to late nineties. Since its inception, the specialty has grown, and the number of specialists has increased. Nevertheless, sleep medicine is still underdeveloped in the KSA, particularly in the areas of clinical service, education, training and research. Based on available data, it appears that sleep disorders are prevalent among Saudis, and the demand for sleep medicine service is expected to rise significantly in the near future. A number of obstacles have been defined that hinder the progress of the specialty, including a lack of trained technicians, specialists and funding. Awareness about sleep disorders and their serious consequences is low among health care workers, health care authorities, insurance companies and the general public. A major challenge for the future is penetrating the educational system at all levels to demonstrate the high prevalence and serious consequences of sleep disorders. To attain adequate numbers of staff and facilities, the education and training of health care professionals at the level of sleep medicine specialists and sleep technologists is another important challenge that faces the specialty. This review discusses the current position of sleep medicine as a specialty in the KSA and the expected challenges of the future. In addition, it will guide clinicians interested in setting up new sleep medicine services in the KSA or other developing countries through the potential obstacles that may face them in this endeavor.
Predictors of obstructive sleep apnea : Special considerations for females
Bahammam Ahmed
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2008,
Abstract:
Pulmonary edema complicating ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome : Low-pressure edema, high-pressure edema, or mixed edema?
BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2005,
Abstract:
Reply to RE: pulmonary edema complicating ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: Low-pressure edema, high-pressure edema, or mixed edema?
BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2005,
Abstract:
Circulating LTB4 and Eotaxin-1 in stable asthmatics on inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β 2-agonists
Alzoghaibi Mohammed,BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Thoracic Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: BACKGROUND : Leukotrienes B4 (LTB4) and eotaxin-1 are thought to play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of asthma. This study investigates the plasma levels of LTB4 and eotaxin-1 in symptom-free asthmatics on inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and long-acting β2 (LABA) . MATERIALS AND METHODS : Twenty asthmatic patients treated with ICS and LABA for 3 months and 17 matched healthy subjects were recruited. LTB4 and eotaxin-1 were measured in the serum by a specific enzyme immunoassay kit. RESULTS : Treatment resulted in significant improvement in FEV1 and disappearance of symptoms. LTB4 levels were significantly lower in the treated asthmatics compared to the healthy subjects (19.17 ± 0.8 pg/ml versus 23.34 ± 0.82 pg/ml respectively, P < 0.001). However, there was no significant difference in the levels of eotaxin-1 between healthy subjects and asthmatic patients. CONCLUSION : Asthmatics treated with ICS and LABA showed significantly lower levels of LTB4 compared to healthy subjects. Regular use of inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting β2 may help in controlling the inflammatory process in asthma. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and assess the association between clinical and physiological parameters and circulating chemokines and cytokines.
Obesity hypoventilation syndrome
Al Dabal Laila,BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Thoracic Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Obesity is becoming a major medical concern in several parts of the world, with huge economic impacts on health- care systems, resulting mainly from increased cardiovascular risks. At the same time, obesity leads to a number of sleep-disordered breathing patterns like obstructive sleep apnea and obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS), leading to increased morbidity and mortality with reduced quality of life. OHS is distinct from other sleep- related breathing disorders although overlap may exist. OHS patients may have obstructive sleep apnea/hypopnea with hypercapnia and sleep hypoventilation, or an isolated sleep hypoventilation. Despite its major impact on health, this disorder is under-recognized and under-diagnosed. Available management options include aggressive weight reduction, oxygen therapy and using positive airway pressure techniques. In this review, we will go over the epidemiology, pathophysiology, presentation and diagnosis and management of OHS.
Unusual cause of respiratory distress misdiagnosed as refractory asthma
Al-Otair Hadil,BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Thoracic Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: We report a young lady, who was labeled as a case of refractory asthma for a few years, based on history of shortness of breath on minimal exertion, noisy breathing and normal chest radiograph. Repeated upper airway exam by an otolaryngologist and computerized tomography scan, were normal. On presentation to our hospital, she was diagnosed to have fixed upper airway obstruction, based on classical flow-volume loop findings. Fibroptic bronchoscopy revealed a web-shaped subglottic stenosis. The histopathology of a biopsy taken from that area, showed non-specific inflammation. No cause for this stenosis could be identified. The patient was managed with rigid bronchoscopy dilatation, without recurrence. We report this case as idiopathic subglottic stenosis, that was misdiagnosed as refractory bronchial asthma, stressing the importance of performing spirometry in the clinic.
Outcome of patients with pulmonary embolism admitted to the intensive care unit
Al Otair Hadeel,Chaudhry Mohammed,Shaikh Shaffi,BaHammam Ahmed
Annals of Thoracic Medicine , 2009,
Abstract: Background:Pulmonary embolism (PE) is an important cause of in-hospital mortality. Many patients are admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) either due to hemodynamic instability or severe hypoxemia. Few reports have addressed the outcome of patients with PE; however, none were from ICUs in the Middle East. Objectives:To describe the demographics, clinical presentation, risk factors and outcome of patients with PE admitted to the medical ICU and to identify possible factors associated with poor prognosis. Materials and Methods:Data were collected retrospectively by reviewing the records of patients admitted to the medical ICU with primary diagnosis of PE between January 2001 and June 2007. Demographic, clinical, radiological and therapeutic data were collected on admission to ICU. Results: Fifty-six patients (43% females) with PE were admitted to the ICU during the study period. Their mean age was 40.6 ± 10.6 years. Seven patients (12.5%) had massive PE with hemodynamic instability and 15 (26.8%) had submassive PE. The remaining patients were admitted due to severe hypoxemia. Recent surgery followed by obesity were the most common risk factors (55.4 and 28.6%, respectively). Four patients with massive PE received thrombolysis because the remaining three had absolute contraindications. Fatal gastrointestinal bleeding occurred in one patient post thrombolysis. Additionally, two patients with massive PE and five with submassive PE died within 72 h of admission to the ICU, resulting in an overall mortality rate of 14%. Nonsurvivors were older and had a higher prevalence of immobility and cerebrovascular diseases compared with survivors. Conclusions: The mortality rate of patients with PE admitted to the ICU in our center was comparable to other published studies. Older age, immobility as well as coexistent cerebrovascular diseases were associated with a worse outcome.
Outcome of patients with severe asthma in the intensive care unit
Alzeer Abdulaziz,BaHammam Ahmed,Masood Mohammed,Basha Sayed
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: Background: Because little has been reported about the outcome of severe asthma outside the US and western Europe, we performed a retrospective case analysis of patients treated in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) of a university hospital in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, to de-termine the management, complications and outcome of severe asthma requiring ICU admission. Methods: The records of patients with severe asthma admitted to the MICU between the periods of January 1996 to December 2003 were re-viewed. Sixty-one episodes from 54 patients were studied, of which 27 (44%) were male. Results: All patients were hypercapnic; 23 (38%) were ventilated. The Acute Physiological and Health Evaluation (APACHE) score II was significantly higher in the ventilated group (P< 0.0001). The pH was sig-nificantly lower and PaCO 2 was significantly higher in the ventilated group (P< 0.0001). All patients survived. Only 42% of patients our series received inhaled corticosteroids before admission. Conclusion: Our results suggestthat severe asthma requiring ICU ad-mission is now safely managed in ICUs. Our results are comparable to recently published data on the treatment of severe asthma in the ICU.
Prevalence of sleep problems and habits in a sample of Saudi primary school children
BaHammam Ahmed,AlFaris Eiad,Shaikh Shaffi,Saeed Abdulaziz
Annals of Saudi Medicine , 2006,
Abstract: Background: Sleep problems in children vary not only with age, but also with ethnic and sociocultural background. No research has been conducted to assess sleep problems in Saudi elementary school children. This study surveyed parents (or guardians) about their elementary school children′s sleep to assess the prevalence of certain sleep problems. Methods: The study population comprised boys and girls attending regular public elementary schools in all grades and was conducted during springtime of the year 1999. A questionnaire inquiring about demographic data, specific sleep problems and habits and home environment was distributed and completed by the parents or guardians. Results: A total of 1012 complete questionnaires were included in the analysis. The sample comprised 511 boys (50.5%) and 501 girls (49.5%). The mean age was 9.5±1.9 years, ranging from 5 to 13 years. Daytime fatigue was the most prevalent sleep problem (37.5%) followed by bedtime resistance (26.2%), difficulty rising in the morning during weekdays (20.7%), and sleep-onset delay (11.8%). Cosleeping with parents was reported in 12.4% of children. The study revealed some differences between boys and girls. Napping during the daytime was reported in 40.8% of children. Conclusion: The study showed that sleep problems are prevalent among Saudi elementary school children. Moreover, the study shed some light on sleep habits and practices in this age group in Saudi Arabia, like the high prevalence of daytime napping.
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