oalib

Publish in OALib Journal

ISSN: 2333-9721

APC: Only $99

Submit

Any time

2019 ( 236 )

2018 ( 490 )

2017 ( 539 )

2016 ( 678 )

Custom range...

Search Results: 1 - 10 of 360174 matches for " Agnes de P;Cocco "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /360174
Display every page Item
Avalia??o de germoplasma de camomila e densidade de semeadura na produ??o e composi??o do óleo essencial
Amaral, Wanderlei do;Deschamps, Cícero;Machado, Marília P;Koehler, Henrique S;Scheer, Agnes de P;Cocco, Lílian;Yamamoto, Carlos;
Horticultura Brasileira , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S0102-05362012000200003
Abstract: the cultivar mandirituba is the only genetic material for chamomile cultivation in southern brazil. besides the limitations regarding floral buds and the yield of essential oil presented by this cultivar, phytosanitary problems have also been observed. the objectives of this work were to compare the genetic materials from the netherlands, denmark and mandirituba and to evaluate the effect of seeding rate on floral heads development and essential oil production, yield and quality. the experiments were carried out at field conditions in piraquara, paraná state, brazil. the essential oil extraction was obtained by hydrodistillation using a clevenger apparatus and the oil composition was analyzed by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (gc/ms). the genetic materials from the netherlands and mandirituba presented statistically higher dry mass accumulation than the ones from denmark. however the material from mandirituba showed a great essential oil yield (4.7 ml g-1 ms) and productivity (2.40 l ha-1). the genetic material from denmark and mandirituba showed similar essential oil composition. the density of 1.0 kg ha-1 for cultivar mandirituba resulted on great plant development and essential oil production. the use of 3.0 kg ha-1 of seeds did not increase plant density due to the high plant competition.
Large Pseudo-Counts and $L_2$-Norm Penalties Are Necessary for the Mean-Field Inference of Ising and Potts Models
J. P. Barton,S. Cocco,E. De Leonardis,R. Monasson
Quantitative Biology , 2014, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.012132
Abstract: Mean field (MF) approximation offers a simple, fast way to infer direct interactions between elements in a network of correlated variables, a common, computationally challenging problem with practical applications in fields ranging from physics and biology to the social sciences. However, MF methods achieve their best performance with strong regularization, well beyond Bayesian expectations, an empirical fact that is poorly understood. In this work, we study the influence of pseudo-count and $L_2$-norm regularization schemes on the quality of inferred Ising or Potts interaction networks from correlation data within the MF approximation. We argue, based on the analysis of small systems, that the optimal value of the regularization strength remains finite even if the sampling noise tends to zero, in order to correct for systematic biases introduced by the MF approximation. Our claim is corroborated by extensive numerical studies of diverse model systems and by the analytical study of the $m$-component spin model, for large but finite $m$. Additionally we find that pseudo-count regularization is robust against sampling noise, and often outperforms $L_2$-norm regularization, particularly when the underlying network of interactions is strongly heterogeneous. Much better performances are generally obtained for the Ising model than for the Potts model, for which only couplings incoming onto medium-frequency symbols are reliably inferred.
Vitamin G: effects of green space on health, well-being, and social safety
Peter P Groenewegen, Agnes E van den Berg, Sjerp de Vries, Robert A Verheij
BMC Public Health , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-6-149
Abstract: The program consists of three projects at three different scales: at a macro scale using data on the Netherlands as a whole, at an intermediate scale looking into the specific effect of green space in the urban environment, and at micro scale investigating the effects of allotment gardens. The projects are observational studies, combining existing data on land use and health interview survey data, and collecting new data through questionnaires and interviews. Multilevel analysis and GIS techniques will be used to analyze the data.Previous (experimental) research in environmental psychology has shown that a natural environment has a positive effect on well-being through restoration of stress and attentional fatigue. Descriptive epidemiological research has shown a positive relationship between the amount of green space in the living environment and physical and mental health and longevity.The program has three aims. First, to document the relationship between the amount and type of green space in people's living environment and their health, well-being, and feelings of safety. Second, to investigate the mechanisms behind this relationship. Mechanisms relate to exposure (leading to stress reduction and attention restoration), healthy behavior and social integration, and selection. Third, to translate the results into policy on the crossroads of spatial planning, public health, and safety. Strong points of our program are: we study several interrelated dependent variables, in different ordinary settings (as opposed to experimental or extreme settings), focusing on different target groups, using appropriate multilevel methods.The briefest summary of our program is in its title: Vitamin G, where G stands for the green space around us. Notions of beneficial effects of nearby green space have persisted throughout history [1]. Research on this topic, mainly experimental research, has focused on demonstrating the relationship between exposure to green environments and well-b
An overview of ethical frameworks in public health: can they be supportive in the evaluation of programs to prevent overweight?
Marieke Have, Inez D de Beaufort, Johan P Mackenbach, Agnes van der Heide
BMC Public Health , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-638
Abstract: Our search for frameworks consisted of three steps. Firstly, we asked experts in the field of ethics and public health for the frameworks they were aware of. Secondly, we performed a search in Pubmed. Thirdly, we checked literature references in the articles on frameworks we found. In total, we thus found six ethical frameworks. We assessed the area on which the available ethical frameworks focus, the users they target at, the type of policy or intervention they propose to address, and their aim. Further, we looked at their structure and content, that is, tools for guiding the analytic process, the main ethical principles or values, possible criteria for dealing with ethical conflicts, and the concrete policy issues they are applied to.All frameworks aim to support public health professionals or policymakers. Most of them provide a set of values or principles that serve as a standard for evaluating policy. Most frameworks articulate both the positive ethical foundations for public health and ethical constraints or concerns. Some frameworks offer analytic tools for guiding the evaluative process. Procedural guidelines and concrete criteria for solving important ethical conflicts in the particular area of the prevention of overweight or obesity are mostly lacking.Public health ethical frameworks may be supportive in the evaluation of overweight prevention programs or policy, but seem to lack practical guidance to address ethical conflicts in this particular area.Is a campaign that stresses the importance of a healthy weight acceptable when it stigmatizes overweight persons? At what point does encouraging physical activity in the workplace become too intrusive in the personal life sphere? Is policy to inform people about health risks of obesity ethically sound when it does not reach people from ethnic minorities? Much public health activity is going on in the field of preventing overweight and obesity. Sometimes this raises pressing ethical questions. Suppose that a pu
Mortality in Dutch hospitals: Trends in time, place and cause of death after admission for myocardial infarction and stroke. An observational study
Laurentius CJ Slobbe, Onyebuchi A Arah, Agnes de Bruin, Gert P Westert
BMC Health Services Research , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6963-8-52
Abstract: Discharge data for all Dutch admissions for index conditions (1996–2003) were linked to the death certification registry. Then, mortality rates within the first 30, 90 and 365 days following admissions were analyzed for deaths occurring within and outside hospitals.Most deaths within a year after admission occurred within 30 days (60–70%). No significant trends in this distribution of deaths over time were observed. Significant trends in the distribution over place of death were observed for both conditions. For myocardial infarction, the proportion of deaths after transfer to another hospital has doubled from 1996–2003. For stroke a significant rise of the proportion of deaths outside hospital was found. For MI the proportion of deaths attributed to a circulatory disease has significantly fallen ovtime. Seven types of hospital mortality indicators, different in scope and observation period, all show a drop of hospital mortality for both MI and stroke over the period 1996–2003. For stroke the observed absolute reduction in death rate increases for the first year after admission, for MI the observed drop in 365-day overall mortality almost equals the observed drop in 30-day in hospital mortality over 1996–2003.Changes in the timing, place and causes of death following admissions for myocardial infarction and stroke have important implications for the definitions of in-hospital and post-admission mortality rates as measures of hospital performance. Although necessary for understanding mortality patterns over time, including within mortality rates deaths which occur outside hospitals and after longer periods following index admissions remain debatable and may not reflect actual hospital performance but probably mirrors transfer, efficiency, and other health care policies.Mortality after admission is seen as an important indicator of hospital performance, and forms part of several sets of quality indicators [1,2]. Some systems of measuring hospital performance even rely
Pectina: da matéria-prima ao produto final
Canteri, Maria H. G.;Moreno, Lirian;Wosiacki, Gilvan;Scheer, Agnes de P.;
Polímeros , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S0104-14282012005000024
Abstract: pectin, probably the most complex macromolecule in nature is a hetero-polysaccharide containing predominantly residues of galacturonic acid (gala). this polymer, which belongs to a group of dietary fibers, is widely used as a gelling agent and stabilizer in the food industry. the main industrial processing to obtain pectin is based on the solubilization of protopectin from apple pomace and citrus peels, which is done under low acidity and heated conditions. recent studies have reported the extraction of pectin from new raw materials and using different extraction conditions, which influence the yield and quality of the final product, and may improve the rheological properties. this review describes the structure, sources, applications and industrial extraction processes, as well as the analysis methods of physicochemical characterization of pectin.
Low radioactivity argon dark matter search results from the DarkSide-50 experiment
The DarkSide Collaboration,P. Agnes,L. Agostino,I. F. M. Albuquerque,T. Alexander,A. K. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,B. Bottino,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,S. Bussino,M. Cadeddu,L. Cadonati,M. Cadoni,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,M. Carlini,S. Catalanotti,P. Cavalcante,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,G. Covone,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,S. De Cecco,M. De Deo,M. De Vincenzi,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pietro,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Forster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,C. Giganti,A. M. Goretti,F. Granato,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. R. Hackett,K. Herner,E. V. Hungerford,Al. Ianni,An. Ianni,I. James,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. L. Kendziora,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kubankin,X. Li,M. Lissia,P. Lombardi,S. Luitz,Y. Ma,I. N. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. M. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,C. J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,P. D. Meyers,T. Miletic,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,A. Monte,M. Montuschi,M. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. J. Mount,V. N. Muratova,P. Musico,J. Napolitano,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,S. Parmeggiano,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. A. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. L. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,C. Savarese,E. Segreto,D. A. Semenov,E. Shields,P. N. Singh
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The DarkSide-50 dark matter search reports the first results obtained using a target of low-radioactivity argon extracted from underground sources. The experiment is located at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso and uses a two-phase time projection chamber as a detector. A total of 155 kg of low radioactivity argon has been obtained, and we have determined that underground argon is depleted in Ar-39 by a factor (1.4 +- 0.2) x 10^3 relative to atmospheric argon. The underground argon is also found to contain (2.05 +- 0.13) mBq/kg of Kr-85. We find no evidence for dark matter in the form of WIMPs in 70.9 live-days of data with a fiducial mass of (36.9 +- 0.6) kg. When combined with our preceding search with an atmospheric argon target, we set a 90 % C.L. upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 2.0 x 10^-44 cm^2 (8.6 x 10^-44 cm^2, 8.0 x 10^-43 cm^2) for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2 (1 TeV/c^2 , 10 TeV/c^2).
The veto system of the DarkSide-50 experiment
The DarkSide Collaboration,P. Agnes,L. Agostino,I. F. M. Albuquerque,T. Alexander,A. K. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,B. Bottino,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,S. Bussino,M. Cadeddu,L. Cadonati,M. Cadoni,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,M. Carlini,S. Catalanotti,P. Cavalcante,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,G. Covone,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,S. De Cecco,M. De Deo,M. De Vincenzi,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pietro,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Foster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,C. Giganti,A. M. Goretti,F. Granato,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. R. Hackett,K. R. Herner,E. V. Hungerford,Aldo Ianni,Andrea Ianni,I. James,T. Johnson,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. L. Kendziora,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kubankin,X. Li,M. Lissia,P. Lombardi,S. Luitz,Y. Ma,I. N. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. M. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,C. J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,P. D. Meyers,T. Miletic,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,A. Monte,M. Montuschi,M. E. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. J. Mount,V. N. Muratova,P. Musico,J. Napolitano,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,S. Parmeggiano,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. A. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. L. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,S. D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,C. Savarese,E. Segreto,D. A. Semenov,E. Shields
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: Nuclear recoil events produced by neutron scatters form one of the most important classes of background in WIMP direct detection experiments, as they may produce nuclear recoils that look exactly like WIMP interactions. In DarkSide-50, we both actively suppress and measure the rate of neutron-induced background events using our neutron veto, composed of a boron-loaded liquid scintillator detector within a water Cherenkov detector. This paper is devoted to the description of the neutron veto system of DarkSide-50, including the detector structure, the fundamentals of event reconstruction and data analysis, and basic performance parameters.
First Results from the DarkSide-50 Dark Matter Experiment at Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso
P. Agnes,T. Alexander,A. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,L. Cadonati,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,P. Cavalcante,A. Chavarria,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,M. De Deo,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pietro,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Forster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,A. Goretti,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Y. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. Hackett,K. Herner,E. V. Hungerford,Al. Ianni,An. Ianni,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. Kendziora,S. Kidner,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kurlej,P. X. Li,B. Loer,P. Lombardi,C. Love,L. Ludhova,S. Luitz,Y. Q. Ma,I. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,C. J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,E. Meroni,P. D. Meyers,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,A. Monte,M. Montuschi,M. E. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. Mount,V. Muratova,P. Musico,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Okounkova,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,L. Papp,S. Parmeggiano,R. Parsells,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,S. D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,E. Segreto,D. Semenov,E. Shields,M. Skorokhvatov,O. Smirnov,A. Sotnikov,C. Stanford,Y. Suvorov,R. Tartaglia,J. Tatarowicz,G. Testera,A. Tonazzo,E. Unzhakov,R. B. Vogelaar,M. Wada,S. Walker,H. Wang,Y. Wang,A. Watson
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1016/j.physletb.2015.03.012
Abstract: We report the first results of DarkSide-50, a direct search for dark matter operating in the underground Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) and searching for the rare nuclear recoils possibly induced by weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). The dark matter detector is a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber with a (46.4+-0.7) kg active mass, operated inside a 30 t organic liquid scintillator neutron veto, which is in turn installed at the center of a 1 kt water Cherenkov veto for the residual flux of cosmic rays. We report here the null results of a dark matter search for a (1422+-67) kg d exposure with an atmospheric argon fill. This is the most sensitive dark matter search performed with an argon target, corresponding to a 90% CL upper limit on the WIMP-nucleon spin-independent cross section of 6.1x10^-44 cm^2 for a WIMP mass of 100 GeV/c^2.
The Electronics and Data Acquisition System of the DarkSide Dark Matter Search
The DarkSide Collaboration,P. Agnes,T. Alexander,A. Alton,K. Arisaka,H. O. Back,B. Baldin,K. Biery,G. Bonfini,M. Bossa,A. Brigatti,J. Brodsky,F. Budano,L. Cadonati,F. Calaprice,N. Canci,A. Candela,H. Cao,M. Cariello,P. Cavalcante,A. Chavarria,A. Chepurnov,A. G. Cocco,L. Crippa,D. D'Angelo,M. D'Incecco,S. Davini,M. De Deo,A. Derbin,A. Devoto,F. Di Eusanio,G. Di Pieto,E. Edkins,A. Empl,A. Fan,G. Fiorillo,K. Fomenko,G. Forster,D. Franco,F. Gabriele,C. Galbiati,A. Goretti,L. Grandi,M. Gromov,M. Y. Guan,Y. Guardincerri,B. Hackett,K. Herner,E. Hungerford,Al. Ianni,An. Ianni,C. Jollet,K. Keeter,C. Kendziora,S. Kidner,V. Kobychev,G. Koh,D. Korablev,G. Korga,A. Kurlej,P. X. Li,B. Loer,P. Lombardi,C. Love,L. Ludhova,S. Luitz,Y. Q. Ma,I. Machulin,A. Mandarano,S. M. Mari,J. Maricic,L. Marini,J. Martoff,A. Meregaglia,E. Meroni,P. D. Meyers,R. Milincic,D. Montanari,M. Montuschi,M. E. Monzani,P. Mosteiro,B. Mount,V. Muratova,P. Musico,A. Nelson,S. Odrowski,M. Okounkoa,M. Orsini,F. Ortica,L. Pagani,M. Pallavicini,E. Pantic,L. Papp,S. Parmeggiano,Bob Parsells,K. Pelczar,N. Pelliccia,S. Perasso,A. Pocar,S. Pordes,D. Pugachev,H. Qian,K. Randle,G. Ranucci,A. Razeto,B. Reinhold,A. Renshaw,A. Romani,B. Rossi,N. Rossi,S. D. Rountree,D. Sablone,P. Saggese,R. Saldanha,W. Sands,S. Sangiorgio,E. Segreto,D. Semenov,E. Shields,M. Skorokhvatov,O. Smirnov,A. Sotnikov,C. Stanford,Suvorov,R. Tartaglia,J. Tatarowicz,G. Testera,A. Tonazzo,E. Unzhakov,R. B. Vogelaar,M. Wada,S. E. Walker,H. Wang,Y. Wang
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: It is generally inferred from astronomical measurements that Dark Matter (DM) comprises approximately 27\% of the energy-density of the universe. If DM is a subatomic particle, a possible candidate is a Weakly Interacting Massive Particle (WIMP), and the DarkSide-50 (DS) experiment is a direct search for evidence of WIMP-nuclear collisions. DS is located underground at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso (LNGS) in Italy, and consists of three active, embedded components; an outer water veto (CTF), a liquid scintillator veto (LSV), and a liquid argon (LAr) time projection chamber (TPC). This paper describes the data acquisition and electronic systems of the DS detectors, designed to detect the residual ionization from such collisions.
Page 1 /360174
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.