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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 593535 matches for " Achiléa L.;Farré "
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Leucemia/linfoma de células T do adulto
Bittencourt, Achiléa L.;Farré, Lourdes;
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S0365-05962008000400011
Abstract: adult t cell leukemia/lymphoma (atl) is an aggressive type of lymphoproliferative disease associated with the human t-cell lymphotropic virus type i (htlv-i) that is characterized by a short survival time and absence of response to chemotherapy. atl is classified into four clinical types: acute, chronic, lymphoma, and smoldering. another clinical form of atl, the primary cutaneous tumoral,with diverse characteristics, has been recently suggested. patients with acute, lymphoma and primary cutaneous tumoral types have a poor prognosis. the diagnostic criteria of atl consist of: positive serology for htlv-i; cytologic or histologic confirmation of cd4+/cd25+ t-cell leukemia/lymphoma; abnormal t lymphocytes in peripheral blood; and confirmation of monoclonal integration of htlv-i proviral dna. there is skin involvement in around 70% of atl cases, which could be primary (smoldering and primary cutaneous tumoral) or secondary. the skin lesions are multiple, erythroderma, papules and plaques being the most common. atl has no characteristic histological pattern, and may present patterns that could superimpose nonspecific peripheral t-cell lymphoma, mycosis fungoides or anaplastic large cell lymphoma. the immunohistochemistry pattern may also be similar to that of other t-cell lymphomas. thus, it is very important that in brazil htlv-i infection be investigated in all mature t-cell leukemias/lymphomas.
Possible risk factors for vertical transmission of Chagas' disease
Bittencourt, Achiléa L.;
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 1992, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-46651992000500006
Abstract: the author emphasizes the importance of the congenital transmission of chagas' disease and discusses the possible risk factors for transmission such as age, origin, obstetrical history and maternal form of disease. exacerbation of infection during pregnancy is also considered as a possible risk factor for transmission. besides, a relationship between the frequency of transmission and gestational age is presented. concerning breast-feeding, the risk of transmission is directly related to the acute phase of maternal disease and bleeding nipples. the deleterious effects of chagasic infection on the fetus and newborn are also considered.
Dermatite infecciosa associada ao HTLV-I (DIH) infanto-juvenil e do adulto
Bittencourt, Achiléa L;Oliveira, Maria de Fátima;
Anais Brasileiros de Dermatologia , 2005, DOI: 10.1590/S0365-05962005001000017
Abstract: infectious dermatitis associated with htlv-i (idh) is a form of infected and recurrent dermatitis which affects children vertically infected with htlv-i. idh starts after 18 months of age. the lesions are erythematous-scaly and frequently crusty and are more frequently located on the scalp and on the retroauricular regions, but the lesions may be generalized. pustules, erythematous-scaly and follicular papulae and retroauricular fissures may also be observed. children present mild to moderate pruritus, lesions in the nostrils, and blepharoconjunctivitis. idh is always associated with staphylococcus aureus infection and/or streptococcus beta haemolyticus infection. the differential diagnosis with atopic and seborrheic dermatitis can be made clinically. histologically it is important to make a differential diagnosis with psoriasis and cutaneous t-cell lymphoma. we discuss here the clinical-immuno-pathological aspects, the differential diagnosis, and the evolution of idh. considering the frequency of idh in salvador, bahia, we suggest that children with severe eczema be submitted to routine serology for htlv-i and that idh be included in the differential diagnosis of dermatitis in adulthood.
No evidence of vertical transmission of HTLV-I in bottle-fed children
BITTENCOURT, Achiléa L;SABINO, Ester C.;COSTA, Maria Cecília;PEDROSO, Celia;MOREIRA, Licia;
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 2002, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-46652002000200002
Abstract: the most frequent pathway of vertical transmission of htlv-i is breast-feeding, however bottle fed children may also become infected in a frequency varying from 4 to 14%. in these children the most probable routes of infection are transplacental or contamination in the birth canal. forty-one bottle-fed children of htlv-i seropositive mothers in ages varying from three to 39 months (average age of 11 months) were submitted to nested polymerase chain reaction analysis (pol and tax genes). 81.5% of the children were born by an elective cesarean section. no case of infection was detected. the absence of htlv-i infection in these cases indicates that transmission by transplacental route may be very infrequent.
No evidence of vertical transmission of HTLV-I in bottle-fed children
BITTENCOURT Achiléa L,SABINO Ester C.,COSTA Maria Cecília,PEDROSO Celia
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 2002,
Abstract: The most frequent pathway of vertical transmission of HTLV-I is breast-feeding, however bottle fed children may also become infected in a frequency varying from 4 to 14%. In these children the most probable routes of infection are transplacental or contamination in the birth canal. Forty-one bottle-fed children of HTLV-I seropositive mothers in ages varying from three to 39 months (average age of 11 months) were submitted to nested polymerase chain reaction analysis (pol and tax genes). 81.5% of the children were born by an elective cesarean section. No case of infection was detected. The absence of HTLV-I infection in these cases indicates that transmission by transplacental route may be very infrequent.
Strongyloidiasis and Infective Dermatitis Alter Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 Clonality in vivo
Nicolas A. Gillet ,Lucy Cook,Daniel J. Laydon,Carol Hlela,Kristien Verdonck,Carolina Alvarez,Eduardo Gotuzzo,Daniel Clark,Lourdes Farré,Achiléa Bittencourt,Becca Asquith,Graham P. Taylor,Charles R. M. Bangham
PLOS Pathogens , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.ppat.1003263
Abstract: Human T-lymphotropic Virus-1 (HTLV-1) is a retrovirus that persists lifelong by driving clonal proliferation of infected T-cells. HTLV-1 causes a neuroinflammatory disease and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma. Strongyloidiasis, a gastrointestinal infection by the helminth Strongyloides stercoralis, and Infective Dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 (IDH), appear to be risk factors for the development of HTLV-1 related diseases. We used high-throughput sequencing to map and quantify the insertion sites of the provirus in order to monitor the clonality of the HTLV-1-infected T-cell population (i.e. the number of distinct clones and abundance of each clone). A newly developed biodiversity estimator called “DivE” was used to estimate the total number of clones in the blood. We found that the major determinant of proviral load in all subjects without leukemia/lymphoma was the total number of HTLV-1-infected clones. Nevertheless, the significantly higher proviral load in patients with strongyloidiasis or IDH was due to an increase in the mean clone abundance, not to an increase in the number of infected clones. These patients appear to be less capable of restricting clone abundance than those with HTLV-1 alone. In patients co-infected with Strongyloides there was an increased degree of oligoclonal expansion and a higher rate of turnover (i.e. appearance and disappearance) of HTLV-1-infected clones. In Strongyloides co-infected patients and those with IDH, proliferation of the most abundant HTLV-1+ T-cell clones is independent of the genomic environment of the provirus, in sharp contrast to patients with HTLV-1 infection alone. This implies that new selection forces are driving oligoclonal proliferation in Strongyloides co-infection and IDH. We conclude that strongyloidiasis and IDH increase the risk of development of HTLV-1-associated diseases by increasing the rate of infection of new clones and the abundance of existing HTLV-1+ clones.
VERTICAL TRANSMISSION OF HTLV-I/II: A review
BITTENCOURT, Achiléa Lisboa;
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-46651998000400008
Abstract: the vertical transmission of the human t-cell lymphotropic virus type i (htlv-i) occurs predominantly through breast-feeding. since some bottle-fed children born to carrier mothers still remain seropositive with a frequency that varies from 3.3% to 12.8%, an alternative pathway of vertical transmission must be considered. the prevalence rate of vertical transmission observed in japan varied from 15% to 25% in different surveys. in brazil there is no evaluation of this form of transmission until now. however, it is known that in salvador, bahia, 0.7% to 0.88% of pregnant women of low socio-economic class are htlv-i carriers. furthermore the occurrence of many cases of adult t-cell leukemia/lymphoma and of four cases of infective dermatitis in salvador, diseases directly linked to the vertical transmission of htlv-i, indicates the importance of this route of infection among us. through prenatal screening for htlv-i and the refraining from breast-feeding a reduction of ~ 80% of vertical transmission has been observed in japan. we suggest that in brazil serologic screening for htlv-i infection must be done for selected groups in the prenatal care: pregnant women from endemic areas, japanese immigrants or japanese descendents, intravenous drug users (idu) or women whose partners are idu, human immunodeficiency virus carriers, pregnant women with promiscuous sexual behavior and pregnant women that have received blood transfusions in areas where blood donors screening is not performed. there are in the literature few reports demonstrating the vertical transmission of htlv-ii.
VERTICAL TRANSMISSION OF HTLV-I/II: A review
BITTENCOURT Achiléa Lisboa
Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de S?o Paulo , 1998,
Abstract: The vertical transmission of the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) occurs predominantly through breast-feeding. Since some bottle-fed children born to carrier mothers still remain seropositive with a frequency that varies from 3.3% to 12.8%, an alternative pathway of vertical transmission must be considered. The prevalence rate of vertical transmission observed in Japan varied from 15% to 25% in different surveys. In Brazil there is no evaluation of this form of transmission until now. However, it is known that in Salvador, Bahia, 0.7% to 0.88% of pregnant women of low socio-economic class are HTLV-I carriers. Furthermore the occurrence of many cases of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and of four cases of infective dermatitis in Salvador, diseases directly linked to the vertical transmission of HTLV-I, indicates the importance of this route of infection among us. Through prenatal screening for HTLV-I and the refraining from breast-feeding a reduction of ~ 80% of vertical transmission has been observed in Japan. We suggest that in Brazil serologic screening for HTLV-I infection must be done for selected groups in the prenatal care: pregnant women from endemic areas, Japanese immigrants or Japanese descendents, intravenous drug users (IDU) or women whose partners are IDU, human immunodeficiency virus carriers, pregnant women with promiscuous sexual behavior and pregnant women that have received blood transfusions in areas where blood donors screening is not performed. There are in the literature few reports demonstrating the vertical transmission of HTLV-II.
Easily repairable networks
Robert S. Farr,John L. Harer,Thomas M. A. Fink
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: We introduce a simple class of distribution networks which withstand damage by being repairable instead of redundant. We prove a lower bound for the expected cost of repair, and show that for networks on the square and triangular lattice, this bound is achievable and results in a network with exactly three levels of structural hierarchy. We extend our results to networks subject to repeated attacks, in which the repairs themselves must be repairable. We find that, in exchange for a modest increase in repair cost, such networks are able to withstand any number of attacks.
Subcutaneous Panniculitis-Like T-Cell Lymphoma (SPTL) in a Child with Spontaneous Resolution
Achiléa L. Bittencourt,Maria das Gra as Silva Vieira,Eny Guimar es Carvalho,Celeste Cunha,Iguaracyra Araujo
Case Reports in Oncological Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/639240
Abstract: Subcutaneous panniculitis-like T-cell lymphomas (SPTLs) α/β are rare in childhood. The present report refers to a case of a 7-year-old male child presenting an extensive skin lesion that began when he was 5 years of age. Two biopsies were evaluated using the CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56, F1, and TIA markers. A dense infiltrate of CD3
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