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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 462520 matches for " A TR Ozuuko "
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Sensory Properties of Traditionally-Fermented Buttermilk (Omashikwa) Processed in Namibia
P G Bille, A TR Ozuuko, T Ngwira
Journal of Food Technology in Africa , 2002,
Abstract: Department of Food Science and Technology, Faculty of Agriculture and Natural Resources, University of Namibia, P/Bag 13301, Windhoek, Namibia. An investigation was carried out to test the hypothesis that the main problems of traditionally-fermented milk products processed in the rural setup are based on variable sensory quality, hygiene and unattractive presentation to consumers. Sensory evaluation scores of 9 samples of traditional fermented buttermilk and control buttermilk from ten panelists for appearance, smell, taste and consistency on a 5-point hedonic scale were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) to judge whether or not differences existed for various characteristics (p<0.05 and p<0.01). Those which showed differences between the means were subjected to Duncan's Multiple Range Test. The results showed that the means of control samples differed significantly from other means and scored the highest points in all characteristics. The control samples were then considered superior. J Food Tech in Africa (2002) 7, 52-54
Microcanonical Determination of the Interface Tension of Flat and Curved Interfaces from Monte Carlo Simulations
A. Tr?ster,K. Binder
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1088/0953-8984/24/28/284107
Abstract: The investigation of phase coexistence in systems with multi-component order parameters in finite systems is discussed, and as a generic example, Monte Carlo simulations of the two-dimensional q-state Potts model (q=30) on LxL square lattices (40<=L<=100) are presented. It is shown that the microcanonical ensemble is well-suited both to find the precise location of the first order phase transition and to obtain an accurate estimate for the interfacial free energy between coexisting ordered and disordered phases. For this purpose, a microcanonical version of the heatbath algorithm is implemented. The finite size behaviour of the loop in the curve describing the inverse temperature versus energy density is discussed, emphasizing that the extrema do not have the meaning of van der Waals-like "spinodal points" separating metastable from unstable states, but rather describe the onset of heterophase states: droplet/bubble evaporation/condensation transitions. Thus all parts of these loops, including the parts that correspond to a negative specific heat, describe phase coexistence in full thermal equilibrium. However, the estimates for the curvature-dependent interface tension of the droplets and bubbles suffer from unexpected and unexplained large finite size effects which need further study.
Enhancing Wind Power Integration through Optimal Use of Flexibility in Multi-Carrier Energy Systems from the Danish Perspective  [PDF]
Yi Zong, Awadelrahman M. A. Ahmed, Jiawei Wang, Shi You, Chresten Tr?holt, Xianyong Xiao
World Journal of Engineering and Technology (WJET) , 2017, DOI: 10.4236/wjet.2017.54B009
Abstract:
Denmark’ goal of being independent of fossil energy sources in 2050 puts forward great demands on all energy subsystems (electricity, heat, gas and transport, etc.) to be operated in a holistic manner. The Danish experience and challenges of wind power integration and the development of district heating systems are summarized in this paper. How to optimally use the cross-sectoral flexibility by intelligent control (model predictive control-based) of the key coupling components in an integrated heat and power system including electrical heat pumps in the demand side, and thermal storage applications in buildings is investigated.
Influence of consumer-driven nutrient recycling on primary production and the distribution of N and P in the ocean
A. Nugraha, P. Pondaven,P. Tréguer
Biogeosciences (BG) & Discussions (BGD) , 2010,
Abstract: In this study we investigated the impact of consumer-driven nutrient recycling (CNR) on oceanic primary production and the distribution of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the deep ocean. For this purpose, we used and extended two existing models: a 2-box model of N and P cycling in the global ocean (Tyrrell, 1999), and the model of Sterner (1990) which formalised the principles of CNR theory. The resulting model showed that marine herbivores may affect the supply and the stoichiometry of N and P in the ocean, thereby exerting a control on global primary production. The predicted global primary production was higher when herbivores were included in the model, particularly when these herbivores had higher N:P ratios than phytoplankton. This higher primary production was triggered by a low N:P resupply ratio, which, in turn, favoured the P-limited N2-fixation and eventually the N-limited non-fixers. Conversely, phytoplankton with higher N:P ratios increased herbivore yield until phosphorus became the limiting nutrient, thereby favouring herbivores with a low P-requirement. Finally, producer-consumer interactions fed back on the N and P inventories in the deep ocean through differential nutrient recycling. In this model, N deficit or N excess in the deep ocean resulted not only from the balance between N2-fixation and denitrification, but also from CNR, especially when the elemental composition of producers and consumers differed substantially. Although the model is fairly simple, these results emphasize our need for a better understanding of how consumers influence nutrient recycling in the ocean.
Influence of consumer-driven nutrient recycling on primary production and the distribution of N and P in the ocean
A. Nugraha,P. Pondaven,P. Tréguer
Biogeosciences Discussions , 2010,
Abstract: In this study we investigated the impact of consumer-driven nutrient recycling (CNR) on oceanic primary production and the distribution of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) in the deep ocean. For this purpose, we used and extended two existing models: a 2-box model of N and P cycling in the global ocean (Tyrrell, 1999), and the model of Sterner (1990) which formalised the principles of CNR theory. The resulting model showed that marine herbivores may affect the supply and the stoichiometry of N and P in the ocean, thereby exerting a control on global primary production. The predicted global primary production was higher when herbivores were included in the model, particularly when these herbivores had higher N:P ratios than phytoplankton. This higher primary production was triggered by a low N:P resupply ratio, which, in turn, favoured the P-limited N2-fixation and eventually the N-limited non-fixers. Conversely, phytoplankton with higher N:P ratios increased herbivore yield until phosphorus became the limiting nutrient, thereby favouring herbivores with a low P-requirement. Finally, producer-consumer interactions fed back on the N and P inventories in the deep ocean through differential nutrient recycling. In this model, N deficit or N excess in the deep ocean resulted not only from the balance between N2-fixation and denitrification, but also from CNR, especially when the elemental composition of producers and consumers differed substantially. Although the model is fairly simply, these results emphasize our need for a better understanding of how consumers influence nutrient recycling in the ocean.
Feyerabend, interculturalism, and ethnobiology: some possible links in Biology teaching
Thales de A. e Tréz
Biotemas , 2011,
Abstract: Usually, the training of educators in Biology is marked by a scientificist approach, legitimating the knowledge on Biology through the Western science, despite any other knowledge about life. Starting from the question on life preferred in the traditional educational approach of Biology, this paper aims to connect the implications of ethnosciences, especially ethnobiology, along with the discussion on inter/multiculturalism and Paul Feyerabend’s thought. According to this literature, it is reasonable to think another Biology is not only possible, but also needed, for the legitimacy of ethno-knowledge in Biology teaching. The selection of one or another ethno-knowledge, considering its context, as a counterpart to a unitism of the scientific view, may contribute to widen the horizons defining the knowledge about life.
Anomalous exponents at the onset of an instability
F. Pétrélis,A. Alexakis
Physics , 2011, DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.014501
Abstract: Critical exponents are calculated exactly at the onset of an instability, using asymptotic expansiontechniques. When the unstable mode is subject to multiplicative noise whose spectrum at zero frequency vanishes, we show that the critical behavior can be anomalous, i.e. the mode amplitude X scales with departure from onset \mu as $ ~ \mu^\beta$ with an exponent $\beta$ different from its deterministic value. This behavior is observed in a direct numerical simulation of the dynamo instability and our results provide a possible explanation to recent experimental observations.
Work up to rule out perioperative myocardial infarction: is it overused?
SK Appavu, TR Haley, A Khorasani, SR Patel
Critical Care , 2000, DOI: 10.1186/cc721
Abstract: Two hundred patients were studied; 85 males and 115 females. Their mean age was 62.9 years. Preexisting conditions included hypertension in 162 patients, peripheral arterial disease in 102, diabetes mellitus in 97, angina in 30, previous myocardial infarction in 41, and smoking in 107. Of 200 patients, 164 had an abnormal preoperative ECG. Vascular operations were performed in 104 patients, nonvascular abdominal operations in 48, and other operations in the remaining 48. Intraoperatively, hypotension occurred in 29 patients, blood loss of > 500 ml in 25 and ECG changes in 10. There were no deaths. PMI occurred in 5/200 (2.5%) patients. Four had undergone vascular operations and one had had an abdominal operation. The mean age of the patients with PMI was 64.2 years. The duration of operation and blood loss were similar to those of patients without PMI. None of these patients developed cardiac failure or cardiogenic shock and none of them died.The incidence of PMI among patients undergoing noncardiac surgery is low and its mortality is negligible. Physicians should become more selective in the use of monitored beds and in the ordering of a work up to rule out PMI.
The Costs of Climate Change: A Study of Cholera in Tanzania
Sara L. M. Tr?rup,Ramon A. Ortiz,Anil Markandya
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health , 2011, DOI: 10.3390/ijerph8124386
Abstract: Increased temperatures and changes in rainfall patterns as a result of climate change are widely recognized to entail potentially serious consequences for human health, including an increased risk of diarrheal diseases. This study integrates historical data on temperature and rainfall with the burden of disease from cholera in Tanzania and uses socioeconomic data to control for the impacts of general development on the risk of cholera. The results show a significant relationship between temperature and the incidence of cholera. For a 1 degree Celsius temperature increase the initial relative risk of cholera increases by 15 to 29 percent. Based on the modeling results, we project the number and costs of additional cases of cholera that can be attributed to climate change by 2030 in Tanzania for a 1 and 2 degree increase in temperatures, respectively. The total costs of cholera attributable to climate change are shown to be in the range of 0.32 to 1.4 percent of GDP in Tanzania 2030. The results provide useful insights into national-level estimates of the implications of climate change on the health sector and offer information which can feed into both national and international debates on financing and planning adaptation.
Clinical examination, MRI and arthroscopy in meniscal and ligamentous knee Injuries – a prospective study
TR Madhusudhan, TM Kumar, SS Bastawrous, A Sinha
Journal of Orthopaedic Surgery and Research , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1749-799x-3-19
Abstract: Clinical tests used in the diagnosis of meniscal and cruciate ligament damage have limitations and it may not be possible to elicit objective signs repeatedly, more so in a busy orthopaedic clinic and being painful in an acute or sub acute presentation. An accurate clinical diagnosis requires experience although difficult to quantify. Magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] has revolutionised the diagnosis and management of intra-articular pathology and ligamentous injuries. Being non invasive and a highly sensitive tool of investigation, early and subtle changes in the soft tissues often are picked up by MRI. Arthroscopy being highly sensitive and specific procedure is both diagnostic and therapeutic, but is invasive.The aim of this study was to correlate the different modalities of diagnosis with arthroscopy as the gold standard and whether a negative MRI could justifiably deny an arthroscopy.Data from 565 consecutive knee arthroscopies performed by two experienced knee surgeons between 2002 and 2005 for degenerative joint disorders, ligament injuries, loose body removals, lateral release of the patellar retinaculum, plica division, and adhesiolysis were prospectively collected. From the above data, a subset of 109 patients who sequentially had clinical examination, MRI and arthroscopy for suspected meniscal and ligament injuries were considered for the present study and the data was reviewed. Patients with previous menisectomies, knee ligament repairs or reconstructions and knee arthroscopies were excluded from the study.Clinical data including patient demographics, wait period between MRI and arthroscopy, suggestive symptoms including effusion, presence of a "pop", locking, mechanism of injury, clinical diagnosis, and operative details were documented and analysed. All patients were examined by two experienced orthopaedic consultants. Clinical tests included Mcmurrays' for meniscal damage, Draw tests for cruciate damage, and valgus and varus stress tests for collateral
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