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Search Results: 1 - 10 of 461291 matches for " A Bejiga "
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Knowledge, attitude and practice towards strabismus in Cheha District, Central Ethiopia
K Geta, A Bejiga
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2012,
Abstract: Background: Strabismus is the commonest cause of amblyopia that can be prevented or treated if detected early. Strabismus also causes psychosocial problems in both children and adults. It is clear that community’s knowledge, attitude and practice dealing with strabismus affect the prevention of strabismic ambylopia and management of strabismus. Knowledge, attitude and practice dealing with strabismus have not been studied previously in Ethiopia. Objectives: To assess knowledge, attitude and practice involving strabismus in Cheha District, Central Ethiopia. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted from November 1 to November 28, 2007 in Cheha District in 10 randomly selected kebeles of the district. People aged 18 years and above from randomly selected households were interviewed about their knowledge, attitude and practice in dealing with strabismus. Results: A total of 420 people were interviewed, of whom 198 (47.1%) were males and 222 (52.9%) were females. All participants reported to have seen a case of strabismus or heard about it, the source of information being family members or neighbors. In assessing their knowledge, 62.8% did not know the causes of strabismus and mentioned only misconceived causes like exposure to bright light. Of the total study population, 225 (53.6%) believed that there is no treatment for strabismus and 51.4% did not want to marry or allow marriage of relatives to a person with strabismus. When they were asked about what actions they would take if there was a case of strabismus in the family, 173 (41.2%) reported that they would not take any action since it cannot be treated, 134 (31.9%) said they would take to the hospital and 113 (29.9%) reported they would try modern medicine even though it cannot be treated. Conclusion: A large proportion of adult population of Cheha District was found to have poor knowledge, attitude and practice regarding the causes and management of strabismus. Health education by health professionals and mass media is thus recommended. [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2011;25(3):212-215]
Prevalence of pterygium in rural community of Meskan District, Southern Ethiopia
A Meseret, A Bejiga, M Ayalew
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2008,
Abstract:
Brief communication: Unilateral blindness and low vision due to strabismic amblyopia
Abebe Bejiga
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2000,
Abstract: To assess the magnitude of unilateral blindness or low vision caused by strabismic amblyopia in astrabismic population, a prospective study was conducted between November 15, 1995 and March 20, 1997 at Menelik II Hospital. The visual acuity of 361 patients with strabismus was evaluated. The average age of persentation was 15.8 years. Visual acuity of less than or equal to 3/60 in the involved eye was considered as blind, while visual acuity better than 3/60 and less than or equal to 6/18 was regarded as low vision. Forty one (11%) patients had unilateral blindness and 72(20%) had low vision in the amblyopic eye. In conclusion, unilateral blindness or low vision as a result of strabismic amblyopia was significant among strabismic patients, especially when the age of persentation of our cases was considered. This calls for health education to increase public awareness so that parents seek medical advice early for their strabismic children. (Ethiopian Journal of Health Development: 2000, 14(1): 109-112)
Common eye diseases in children of rural community in Goro district, Central Ethiopia
Mohammed Shaffi, Abebe Bejiga
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2005,
Abstract:
Environmental risk factors and the development of trachomatous trichiasis in Dalocha District, Central Ethiopia: a case-control study
Ameha Bogale, Abebe Bejiga
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2002,
Abstract: Background: Trachoma is the second leading cause of blindness in Ethiopia. Even in trachoma hyperendemic areas, not all member of the community develop trichiasis. Whether this is due to uneven exposure or other factors is not clear. This necessitated a case-control study to see the extent of exposure among these groups. Objective: The purpose of the study was to assess the extent of exposure to known environmental risk factors among cases with trachomatous trichiasis and age, sex and location matched controls with no trachomatous trichiasis in Dalocha District, Central Ethiopia. Methods: all patients with clinically diagnosed trachomatous trichiasis (TT) according to the WHO definition for TT and an equal number of sex and location matched controls with no trachomatous trichasis were subjected to an interviewer administered questionnaire consisting of questions assessing family size, number of children raised, frequency of face washing, water sources and distance from it in minutes, location of kitchen, toilet waste disposal, place for cattle at night and some more considered to be related with repeated trachomatous infection. Results: One hundred ninety seven cases with TT and an equal number of controls were the study subjects. Regression analysis of individual risk factors showed that irregular face washing practice (odds ratio (OR))=2.27;95% confidence interval (CI):1.48-3.49) and being illiterate (OR=0.34;CI:0.18-0.64) were significantly associated with the development of TT. Regarding face washing, this significance was also maintained in a logistic regression analysis of the variables where the type of water used for washing and the frequency of cooking were also positively associated with TT. Conclusion: Improved educational status and regular face washing of the community may decrease the likelihood that people will be at risk of developing TT and its blinding complications. [Ethiop.J.Health Dev. 2002;16(3):287-293]
Impact of grasspea genotypes and sowing dates on seed β-ODAP concentration and agronomic traits.
G Bejiga, Y Anbessa, AM Abd El-Moneim, L Korbu, A Fikre, J Ryan, S Ahmed, H Nakkoul
African Crop Science Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Grasspea (Lathyrus sativus) is an important food legume crop in Ethiopia. However, its nutritional value ishindered by β-ODAP that causes lathyrism in humans. The extent of toxicity is influenced by genetic andagronomic factors.We conducted an experiment to determine the effect of varieties and sowing dates on the β-ODAP content of the seeds and other yield components. Two varieties, Bio-520 and landrace, were planted onJuly 24, August 7 and 21, and September 4 in the 2001-02 and 2002-03 cropping seasons. Grasspea variety andseason, significantly influenced β-ODAP content of the seeds.The highly significant variety x season interactionssuggests that varieties behave differently in different seasons for their β-ODAP content. The main effects andinteractions were highly significant for days-to-flowering and plant height. Although β-ODAP content of thevarieties varied with season, the improved genotype always contained less β-ODAP concentration.Thus, whilethe development of low-toxin grasspea lines is the primary goal, modifying agronomic practices is also importantto mitigate lathyrism. Key Words: Ethiopia, Lathyrus sativus, Lathyrism, neurotoxin
National Survey on Blindness, Low Vision and Trachoma in Ethiopia: Methods and Study Clusters Profile
Y Berhane, A Worku, A Bejiga, L Adamu, W Alemayehu, A Bedri, Z Haile, A Ayalew, W Adamu, T Gebre, T D Kebede, E West, S West
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2007,
Abstract: Background: The magnitude and causes of eye diseases in Ethiopia has been derived from small scale studies. This information became no longer useful in tracking the success of intensified efforts in preventing and controlling avoidable causes of blindness and eye diseases in line with the goals of Vision 2020: The Right to Sight. Objective: The national household survey was conducted primarily to provide national and regional state level estimates of low vision, blindness and trachoma. The secondary aims include describing the major causes of low vision and blindness. Methods: The national survey utilized cross sectional epidemiological study design with multistage sampling strategy. All nine regional states and two city administrations of the country were involved in the survey. Sample size and sampling strategies were developed taking into account population size of the regional states. Visual acuity was tested using the LogMar chart and trachoma grading was done following the WHO grading system. The cause of low vision and blindness were determined by ophthalmologists. Results: A total of 174 clusters, 6056 households and 30022 individuals were involved in the survey. Of the total 30022 individuals 25650 (85.4%) were present and examined by the survey team. Implementing quality control supervision in the very remote clusters was a major challenge. About 55% of the survey clusters were within 10 Km of health facility that stock tetracycline; 18.3% within 10 Km of health facility that provides Trachomatous Trichiasis (TT) surgery and 18.6% were within 10Km of health facility that provides cataract surgery. Only 29.4% of the survey clusters were fully accessible by car. The majority of survey household head were farmers (70.8%) and illiterate (64.5%). About 48% of the households obtain their water from either a protected well/spring or piped distribution. Only 40.4% of the households reported that no animal is kept around the living quarter. Most households dispose garbage in open field (84.6%) and have no latrine (60.3%). Conclusion: The survey was conducted on a representative sample and provides reliable estimates at the national and regional levels. However, careful interpretations of results from remote and inaccessible areas are warranted. Access to eye care facilities are limited and need expansion in order to reduce the blindness and low vision load. Sanitation conditions favoring fly breeding are rampant and trachoma control program need to emphasize a more integrated approach. Ethiopian Journal of Health Development Vol. 21 (3) 2007: pp. 185-203
Prevalence and causes of blindness and Low Vision in Ethiopia
Y Berhane, A Worku, A Bejiga, L Adamu, W Alemayehu, A Bedri, Z Haile, A Ayalew, Y Adamu, T Gebre, T D Kebede, E West, S West
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2007,
Abstract: Background: Ethiopia lacked accurate recent national estimates of blindness and low vision. Therefore, prevention and control programs face serious problem of lack of recognition of the problem and challenges in tracking achievements towards program goals. Objective: To determine the prevalence of blindness and low vision at the national and regional levels in Ethiopia. Method: A national survey was conducted on a representative population in all nine regional states and two city administrations of the country. The LogMar chart was used to determine the presenting visual acuity and ophthalmologists determined the primary cause of low vision and blindness. Results: Based on the assessment of the presenting visual acuity, the national prevalence of blindness is 1.6% (1.1% for urban and 1.6% for rural populations) and that of low vision is 3.7% (2.6% for urban and 3.8% for rural populations). Blindness and Low vision are more prevalent among females. The major causes of blindness are cataract and trachomatous corneal opacity. The major causes of low vision are cataract and refractive error. Prevalence of childhood blindness is 0.1% and accounts for over 6% of the total blindness burden in Ethiopia. The national prevalence of Bitot\'s spots is 0.7%. Conclusion: Blindness and low vision are major public health problems in Ethiopia. The large proportion of low vision (91.2%) and blindness (87.4%) are due to avoidable (either preventable or treatable) causes. Females and rural residents carry greater risk for eye problems. Adequate emphasis needs to be given to prevent blindness among children and avert millions of years of unnecessary blindness. Recognizing the severity of the magnitude of eye problems (blindness and low vision) and enhancing the government commitment to improve the situation is critical. Ethiopian Journal of Health Development Vol. 21 (3) 2007: pp. 204-210
Socio-demographic profile and prevalence of HIV infection among VCT clients in Addis Ababa
Antenane Korra, Mebiratu Bejiga, Solomon Tesfaye
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2005,
Abstract:
Outcome of extra-capsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation performed at a cataract surgical campaign
Tesfaye Haileselassie, Yared Asefa, Samson Bayu, Abebe Bejiga
Ethiopian Journal of Health Development , 2002,
Abstract: [Ethiop. J. Health Dev. 2002;16(1): 77-84]
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