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An Investigation on Nutritional Problems of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana) Grown in Acid Soils of Turkey  [PDF]
Aydin Adiloglu,Sevinc Adiloglu
Pakistan Journal of Biological Sciences , 2004,
Abstract: This study aimed the determination of nutritional problems of hazelnut (Corylus avellana) grown acid soils in this research. For this purpose, soil and leaf samples were taken from 30 different hazelnut grown area from Trabzon Region. Some physical and chemical properties and some nutrient element contents of soil and leaf samples were determined. This determined values were compered with critical values and the degree of sufficiency were evaluated. According to the results, organic matter, total N, available P, exchangeable K and Mg contents of soil samples were determined sufficient and high, generally. Ca deficiency was obtained in the 93.4% of the soil, because of acid property of the soils. Available Fe, Cu and Mn contents of the soils were determined sufficient. In the 70 % of the soils; Zn deficiency was found. N, P, K, Ca, Mg and Zn deficiency of leaf samples were determined 20.0, 26.7, 6.7, 73.4, 50.0 and 66.7%, respectively. Fe, Cu and Mn contents of leaf samples were determined sufficient.
Foliar Nitrogen (N), Phosphorus (P) Dynamics, and Foliar Resorption of Corylus avellana var. avellana
Tugba Bayrak Ozbucak,Hamdi Guray KUTBAY,Sevda Yalcin,Dudu Kilic
Ekoloji , 2011,
Abstract: Corylus avellana var. avellana (Corylaceae) has a widespread distribution in the Central Black Sea Region of Turkey and is very valuable in the food industry and plays an important role in the economy of the Black Sea Region of Turkey. In this study, nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) concentrations along a topographical gradient (from sea level to 550 m) and through the growing season (from April to October) were investigated. In addition to this, foliar resorption was also studied as resorption efficiency (RE) and resorption proficiency (RP) which is defined as the proportion of nutrients withdrawn from leaves and the N and P concentrations in senesced leaves, respectively. Statistically significant differences were not found with respect to leaf N concentration and SLA during the growing season although leaf P concentration, leaf N/P ratio and SLA were significantly changed during the growing season. Except for NRE, PRE, ARP, and PRP all of the leaf traits were significantly changed along the topographic gradient. The N/P ratio which is an indicator of N- and P- limitation decreased during the growing season and along the topographic gradient. The N and P concentrations in the senescent leaves of C. avellana was below 50 μg cm-2 and 3 μg cm-2, respectively along the topographic gradient and this species is N and P-proficient according to the threshold values. Soil properties along the topographic gradient also changed.
Pomological characteristics of superior selections of European filbert -C. avellana L.- and Turkish hazel -C. colurna L.-
Mileti? Rade,?iki? Mihajlo,Miti? Nevena,Nikoli? Radomirka
Genetika , 2005, DOI: 10.2298/gensr0502103m
Abstract: Eight selections of European filbert and Turkish hazel each were singled out for their prominent characteristics in an examination in Eastern Serbia over the 1998-2003 period. Coarseness, form and weight of nuts and kernels, as well as kernel chemical content, were analysed. Yielding potential was investigated as a proportion of nuts in filbert and hazel inflorescences. Average nut coarseness of the C. avellana L. selections was 18.0x14.7x12.6 mm, and of C. colurnaL. 16.3xl4.0x 11.0 mm, while average kernel coarseness was 13.3x9.1x7.6 mm and 13.9x 9.7x 6.5 mm, respectively. Nut weight of the former was 1.01-1.80 g, and of the latter 1.00-1.75 g, while kernel weight ranged 0.30-0.79 g, and 0.31-0.65 g, respectively. The respective kernel contents were 27.9-46.2%, and 30.7-40.8 %. The occurrence of shriveled nuts was minimal, appearing in six selections of C. avellana (0.8-3.1%), and five selections of C. colurna (1.4-5.7%). The pest Balaninus nucum was observed in only three selections of C. colurna L., ranging from 1.0 to 1.6 %. Oil content in the nuts of the selected C. avellana L. trees was 44.6-49.9 %, and 48.6-54.4 % in those of C. colurna L. Crude proteins amounted to 12.3-10.8 % and 11.7-10.4 %, and mineral matter content to 2.8-2.4% and 2.6-2.0 %, respectively. The selections of European filbert were found to have 4-6 nuts to an inflorescence. Predominating were two (29.4 %), one (26.7 %) and three (24.5 %) nuts to a single inflorescence. C. colurna L. inflorescences were found to contain 8-13 nuts. Most inflorescences had five (26.6 %), four (21.5 %) and six nuts (20.3 %). Selections 1, 5, 6 and 3 of C. avel-lana were found to be especially outstanding regarding most parameters, as well as selections 7, 3, 2 and 8 of C. colurna L.
Controlled Rhizogenesis and Mycorrhization of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) Cuttings with Black Truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vitt.)
Santelices,Rómulo; Palfner,G?tz;
Chilean journal of agricultural research , 2010, DOI: 10.4067/S0718-58392010000200003
Abstract: hazelnut (corylus avellana l.) is commonly used as mycorrhizal host for tuber melanosporum vitt. (black truffle). black truffle orchards have been established in and outside its natural distribution area, currently also in chile. hazelnut can be propagated rapidly by cuttings, which, however, may not easily form mycorrhizal symbiosis under laboratory conditions. we successfully inoculated hazelnut cuttings with t. melanosporum and studied the effects of culture conditions, plant material and inoculum age on rhizogenesis and mycorrhization. cuttings from sucker shoots showed the highest rooting rate (88.5%). perlite and vermiculite as substrate increased root length (9.6 cm ). treatment with auxin significantly increased root yield (up to 27 roots per cutting). larger containers increased the mycorrhization rate (33.6%). up to 2 year storage of sporal inoculum did not affect mycorrhization. we conclude that root induction in c. avellana cuttings and mycorrhization with black truffle using up to 2-yr-old inoculum, do not present problems when performed under optimized conditions, allowing fast production of plants for commercial and reforestation purposes.
Evaluation of the Genetic Diversity of several Corylus avellana Accessions from the Romanian National Hazelnut Collection  [cached]
Iulia Francesca POP,Doru PAMFIL,Paul Andrei RAICA,Ioana Virginia PETRICELE
Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca , 2010,
Abstract: Romanian hazelnut (Corylus avellana) germplasm is held in a national collection at SCDP Valcea. A clear situation of the held accessions is necessary for an efficient management of the germplasm collection. In order to achieve this, the genetic variability of 43 accessions was assessed using 23 RAPD primers. The RAPD analysis was carried out as a screening test to confirm the genetic identity of some accessions. Based on the screening results, 12 accessions were selected for analysis using nine SSR primers. A high level of genetic diversity was observed (He=0.75, Ho=0.81, F=-0.061) among the analyzed samples. A genetic similarity matrix was constructed and the resulting UPGMA dendrogram revealed three major groups, corresponding to the geographical origin of the accessions. In order to increase the effectiveness of genebank management, the identification of duplicate and mislabeled accessions with the aid of molecular markers is of high interest, especially being the first one of this kind in a Romanian hazelnut germplasm collection.
Antioxidant Activity, Total Phenolics and Taxol Contents Response of Hazel (Corylus avellana L.) Cells to Benzoic Acid and Cinnamic Acid
Ebrahim BEMANI,Faezeh GHANAT,Laleh YOUSEFZADEH BOROUJENI,Faezeh KHATAMI
Notulae Botanicae Horti Agrobotanici Cluj-Napoca , 2012,
Abstract: Hazel (Corylus avellana L.) plant has been recently introduced as a plant with the ability to produce Taxol. In the present research effects of different concentrations of benzoic acid and cinnamic acid on the phenolic compounds, Taxol content, and antioxidant activity of extracts of suspension-cultured hazel cells were investigated. The cells were treated with different concentrations of benzoic acid (0, 0.5, and 1 mM) and cinnamic acid (0, 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mM) on day 7 of subculture and were harvested on day 14. Benzoic acid in higher concentrations increased Taxol (4 fold of the control) and antioxidant activity of the cell extract. Cinnamic acid supply did not bring remarkable increase in Taxol content but increased phenolic contents and antioxidant activity of hazel cells extract. Interestingly, the extract of hazel cells showed more cytotoxicity for human cancer cells than pure Taxol. Further investigations may suggest the extract of cinnamic- and benzoic acid- fed hazel cells for treatment of cancer cells.
Synergistic Accumulative Effect of Salicylic Acid and Dibutyl Phthalate on Paclitaxel Production in Corylus avellana Cell Culture  [PDF]
Rezaei, A.,Ghanati, F.,Behmanesh, M.,Safari, M.
Journal of Stress Physiology & Biochemistry , 2013,
Abstract: Suspension cell cultures of Corylus avellana were challenged with salicylic acid and its combined use with dibutyl phthalate solvent. Salicylic acid with concentrations of 12.5, 25 and 50 mg L–1 and 10% (v/v) dibutyl phthalate were used and added on day 8 and 10 of subculture, respectively. The results showed that growth, viability and protein content of cells were decreased by the treatments, compared to control. In all treatments, hydrogen peroxide content and lipid peroxidation rate of cells increased, compared to those of the control cells. Activity of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase increased by salicylic acid and, dibutyl phthalate exaggerated effect of salicylic acid. While flavonoids content decreased by the treatments, paclitaxel content increased significantly. The extracellular paclitaxel was more affected, compared to cell-associated paclitaxel and all treatments increased paclitaxel release and specific yield compared to that of the control. The most production of paclitaxel and specific yield of it were observed under effect of combined use of salicylic acid (50 mg L–1) and dibutyl phthalate, suggesting a synergistic accumulative effect.
Measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence as an auxiliary method in estimating susceptibility of cultivated hazel (Corylus L.) for filbert aphid (Myzocallis coryli goetze)
Magdalena Gantner,W?adys?aw Micha?ek
Acta Agrobotanica , 2010, DOI: 10.5586/aa.2010.021
Abstract: The influence of aphid feeding on chlorophyll a fluorescence in the leaves of four cultivated hazel cultivars, with different levels of resistance to filbert aphid (Myzocallis coryli Goetze), was studied. The maximum effect of photosystem reaction measured on dark-adapted hazel leaves (Fv/Fm parameter) and maximum efficiency of photon energy PAR conversion to chemical energy in light conditions (Y parameter) were estimated twice, in the leaves of four hazel cultivars with different levels of resistance to filbert aphid, using a fluorometer PAM- 2000 by Walz GmbH - Germany. The analysis of changes of these parameters showed that aphid feeding caused a reaction in all tested cultivars. The most visible reduction of the Fv/Fm and Y values as a result of aphid feeding was observed in the cultivars 'Cud z Bollwiller' and 'Olbrzymi z Halle', numerously colonized by aphids. A smaller number of aphids found on the leaves of more resistant cultivars - 'Kataloński' and 'Lamberta Bia y', caused a weaker response of plants and a smaller decline in the value of this parameter. 'Cud z Bollwiller' cultivar showed higher tolerance than other tested cultivars to stress caused by the feeding of sucking insects. The Fv/Fm and Y parameters can be regarded as reliable indexes useful in diagnosing susceptibility of hazel cultivars to aphids, helpful in determining, for example, harmfulness thresholds.
Controlled Rhizogenesis and Mycorrhization of Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) Cuttings with Black Truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vitt.) Rizogénesis y Micorrización Controlada de Estacas de Avellano Europeo (Corylus avellana L.) con Trufa Negra (Tuber melanosporum Vitt.)  [cached]
Rómulo Santelices,G?tz Palfner
Chilean Journal of Agricultural Research , 2010,
Abstract: Hazelnut (Corylus avellana L.) is commonly used as mycorrhizal host for Tuber melanosporum Vitt. (black truffle). Black truffle orchards have been established in and outside its natural distribution area, currently also in Chile. Hazelnut can be propagated rapidly by cuttings, which, however, may not easily form mycorrhizal symbiosis under laboratory conditions. We successfully inoculated hazelnut cuttings with T. melanosporum and studied the effects of culture conditions, plant material and inoculum age on rhizogenesis and mycorrhization. Cuttings from sucker shoots showed the highest rooting rate (88.5%). Perlite and vermiculite as substrate increased root length (9.6 cm ). Treatment with auxin significantly increased root yield (up to 27 roots per cutting). Larger containers increased the mycorrhization rate (33.6%). Up to 2 year storage of sporal inoculum did not affect mycorrhization. We conclude that root induction in C. avellana cuttings and mycorrhization with black truffle using up to 2-yr-old inoculum, do not present problems when performed under optimized conditions, allowing fast production of plants for commercial and reforestation purposes. El avellano europeo (Corylus avellana L.) es uno de los simbiontes más comunes utilizados para inocular plantas con Tuber melanosporum Vitt. (trufa negra). Los huertos truferos han sido establecidos tanto dentro como fuera del área de distribución natural de este hongo micorrizógeno, actualmente también en Chile. El avellano europeo puede propagarse rápidamente por estacas. Sin embargo, no es fácil el desarrollo de órganos micorrícicos bajo condiciones de laboratorio. En este estudio se inocularon exitosamente estacas de avellano europeo con T. melanosporum y se estudió el efecto de algunos tratamientos culturales, del material vegetal y tiempo de almacenamiento del inóculo, en el proceso de rizogénesis y micorrización. Las estacas provenientes de chupones tuvieron una mayor capacidad de arraigamiento (88,5%). El uso de perlita y vermiculita como sustrato incrementó la longitud de las raíces (9,6 cm ). Los tratamientos con auxinas aumentaron significativamente la producción de raíces (más de 27 raíces por estaca). Por otra parte, el uso de contenedores más grandes permitió incrementar el porcentaje de micorrización (33,6%) y fue posible almacenar hasta 2 a os el inóculo esporal sin que se afecte la micorrización. Se concluye que es posible la inducción de raíces en estacas de C. avellana y su micorrización con trufa negra utilizando inóculo de hasta 2 a os de almacenamiento, bajo condiciones controladas
Investigation on Quality and Quantity of Forest Types Common Hazel (Corylus avellana L.) in Foundogluo Forest, Iran
Ali Akbar Imani,Younes Rostamikia,Muharram Hoshyar
Botany Research Journal , 2011, DOI: 10.3923/brj.2011.1.2
Abstract: The total forest area of Iran is approximately 12 million ha which make only 7.3% of the total land area. Foundoglu forest is a unique forest with 1773 ha and located at the and of western Elburz Mountain chains, in Ardabil province (North Eastern of Iran). For doing this research, we have organized a sampling to drive structural information of some quantitative and qualitative characteristics. Stand measurement was a systematic random sampling. With the sampling grid of 150x200 m and plot area 500 m2 and the measurement of structural characteristics were done to get information on species, origin of sp., quality of sp., collar diameter, total height canopy cover, regeneration, slope aspect and altitude. Results showed that common hazel is distributed on site between 1370 and 1580 m.a.s.I. with 352.2 mm annul precipitation and mean annul temperature 9.7°C five vegetation types of Corylus-Quercus, Corylus-Fagus, Fagus-Corylus, Corylus-Acer and mixed Corylus were separated.
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