oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Minimally painful retrieval of ureteral stent by using ureteroscopy  [PDF]
Haluk S?ylemez,Bülent Altunoluk,Kadir ?nem,Fatih O?uz
Journal of Clinical and Experimental Investigations , 2010,
Abstract: Aim: The standard method for retrieving the ureteral stents is the cystoscopic technique. We describe a minimally painful method for retrieving ureteral stents by using an ureteroscope.Methods: A total of 60 patients with ureteral stents were enrolled in this study. The patients were randomized into a cystoscopic (30 cases) and an ureteroscopic (30 cases) group. All stents were retrieved by a cystoscope in the first group and by an ureteroscope in the second group, under topical anesthesia. Patients in each group were assessed for stented time, stent side and reason of stent placement, operative time, peroperative pain, postoperative pain, irritative voiding symptoms and hematuria.Results: Stents were successfully retrieved in 60 patients. There were no statistical differences in the two groups regarding patient’s gender and age or stent side, operative time and stented time (p>0.05). Mean operative pain score was significantly higher in the cystoscopic group than in the ureteroscopic group (p<0.01). The irritative voiding symptom scores and hematuria were more prevalent in the first group than the second (p< 0.05).Conclusion: In present study ureteroscopic stent retrieval was found to be minimally a painful, safe and reliable method. The ureteroscopic retrieval procedure is highly tolerable by patients than the cystoscopic retrieval. We suggest that it may be the standard technique for stent retrieval. J Clin Exp Invest 2010; 1(1): 7-11
A Case of Descending Necrotizing Mediastinitis Following Tooth Cleaning With a Crochet Hook
Muharrem Erol,Ahmet Ural,Celal Tekinba?,Mehmet ?mamoglu
Journal of Clinical and Analytical Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.4328
Abstract: Acute mediastinitis is a potentially fatal condition that caused by oropharyngeal infections, esophageal perforations or after cardio-thoracic surgery . Early diagnosis, aggressive surgical debridement and drainage are important for succesful treatment. Here we present a case of DNM that caused by tooth cleaning with a crochet hook. There is no case of DNM in the literature developed after teeth cleaning.
Updates on the use of ureteral stents: focus on the Resonance stent
Manoj V Rao, Anthony J Polcari, Thomas MT Turk
Medical Devices: Evidence and Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S11744
Abstract: ates on the use of ureteral stents: focus on the Resonance stent Review (3874) Total Article Views Authors: Manoj V Rao, Anthony J Polcari, Thomas MT Turk Published Date December 2010 Volume 2011:4 Pages 11 - 15 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/MDER.S11744 Manoj V Rao, Anthony J Polcari, Thomas MT Turk Department of Urology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USA Abstract: The Resonance metallic ureteral stent is one of the latest additions to the urologist’s armamentarium in managing ureteral obstruction. One advantage of this stent over traditional polymer-based stents is resistance to encrustation with stone material, which allows longer dwell times and less frequent exchange procedures. Although exchanging a metallic stent is slightly more complicated than exchanging a polymer stent, the fluoroscopic techniques required are familiar to most urologists. The Resonance stent is also more resistant to compression by external forces, potentially allowing greater applicability in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of this stent in patients with benign ureteral obstruction is shown to be associated with significant cost reduction. Clinical studies on the use of this stent are accumulating and the results are mixed, although Level 1 evidence is lacking. In this article we present a comprehensive review of the available literature on the Resonance metallic ureteral stent.
Updates on the use of ureteral stents: focus on the Resonance® stent  [cached]
Manoj V Rao,Anthony J Polcari,Thomas MT Turk
Medical Devices: Evidence and Research , 2010,
Abstract: Manoj V Rao, Anthony J Polcari, Thomas MT TurkDepartment of Urology, Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, IL, USAAbstract: The Resonance metallic ureteral stent is one of the latest additions to the urologist’s armamentarium in managing ureteral obstruction. One advantage of this stent over traditional polymer-based stents is resistance to encrustation with stone material, which allows longer dwell times and less frequent exchange procedures. Although exchanging a metallic stent is slightly more complicated than exchanging a polymer stent, the fluoroscopic techniques required are familiar to most urologists. The Resonance stent is also more resistant to compression by external forces, potentially allowing greater applicability in patients with metastatic cancer. Furthermore, the use of this stent in patients with benign ureteral obstruction is shown to be associated with significant cost reduction. Clinical studies on the use of this stent are accumulating and the results are mixed, although Level 1 evidence is lacking. In this article we present a comprehensive review of the available literature on the Resonance metallic ureteral stent.Keywords: resonance, metallic, ureteral, stent, obstruction
A knotted ureteral stent: A case report and review of the literature  [cached]
Picozzi Stefano,Carmignani Luca
Urology Annals , 2010,
Abstract: The indications for ureteral stent placement have expanded significantly with the progress of surgical procedures and techniques. Although such stents are now an integral part of contemporary urological practice, their use is not free of complications and consequences. There are very rare descriptions of knot formation in a ureteral stent and the consequences of this occurrence, with only 12 cases previously reported. Here, we report an additional case and review all the literature concerning this urological complication with emphasis on its predisposing factors and conservative and surgical management.
Calcificación gigante en extremo distal de stent ureteral
Arrabal Polo,Miguel ángel; Nogueras Oca?a,Mercedes; Arrabal Martín,Miguel; Merino Salas,Sergio; Miján Ortiz,José Luis; Zuluaga Gómez,Armando;
Archivos Espa?oles de Urología (Ed. impresa) , 2010, DOI: 10.4321/S0004-06142010001000008
Abstract: objective: the commonest indications for ureteral stent placement are: obstructive nephrolithiasis, renoureteral surgery, urologic oncology, endourology and extrinsic ureteral compression. methods: we report the case of a 77-year-old male patient with a dj ureteral catheter placed for an 8-month period and history of nephrolithiasis; the stent showed a 60 mm x 30 mm calcification, on its distal end. results: open cystolithotomy and removal of stent resolved the clinic symptomatology. conclusion: a prolonged indwell time of stents, as well as a history of nephrolithiasis and urinary infections may on many occasions result in calcification and encrustation of ureteral stents, and will lead to the use of endourology techniques, extracorporeal lithotripsy or open surgery to resolve these conditions.
Encrusted Ureteral Stent Retrieval Using Flexible Ureteroscopy with a Ho: YAG Laser
Takashi Kawahara,Hiroki Ito,Hideyuki Terao,Takehiko Ogawa,Hiroji Uemura,Yoshinobu Kubota,Junichi Matsuzaki
Case Reports in Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/862539
Abstract: A 23-year-old female had bilateral ureteral stents placed due to bilateral renal stones and hydronephrosis. The bilateral ureteral stents were changed every 3 months. A kidney ureter bladder (KUB) film showed left encrustation along the ureteral stent thus necessitating removal; however, the ureteral stent could not be removed cystoscopically. The ureteral stent was, therefore, extracted using flexible ureteroscopy (URS) with a holmium (Ho): yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) laser.
Hook Phenomenon: Intermittent distal ureteral obstruction following reimplantation
"A. M. Kajbafzadeh,M. Mehdizadeh "
Iranian Journal of Radiology , 2003,
Abstract: Background/Objectives: To evaluate the child with intermittent ureteral obstruction following antireflux surgery and to introduce a new imaging technique for diagnosis of the socalled “hook” phenomenon, the most serious complication of antireflux surgery. Patients and Methods: Twenty-five children with a history of antireflux surgery who were referred for either persistent urinary tract infection (UTI) or progressive hydronephrosis were included in the study. All the children with signs and symptoms of voiding dysfunction or persistent reflux were excluded. A new imaging technique was devised to evaluate these patients for the presence of “hook phenomenon”, in which a renal ultrasound was performed both on a full bladder and after voiding. If dilatation of the urinary tract was detected on full bladder, and this dilatation decreased dramatically following micturition, then a catheter was passed into the bladder and was filled with normal saline (based on the estimated bladder capacity in order to avoid over-distension). An intravenous urogram and saline cystogram were performed simultaneously. After 20 minutes, 2 abdominal radiographs were obtained on full and emptied bladder, both. Results: On the intravenous urogram, some children showed typical “J- hook-shaped” ureters. In all the cases marked hydronephrosis was noted, with no contrast material seen entering the bladder on the 20 minute radiogram. Upon evacuation of the bladder, both ureters promptly drained into the bladder and the”J-hooking” of the ureters and hydronephrosis resolved. Conclusion: "J- hook phenomenon” is one of the most common causes of hydronephrosis and hydroureter following ureteral re-implantation is intermittent ureteral obstruction from creation of the new ureteral hiatus at an inappropriate site. This complication is frequently misdiagnosed as irreversible uretero-vesical junction obstruction from ischemia or fibrosis. Once the diagnosis of “J- hook” phenomenon is confirmed, early ureteral reimplantation with creation of a new hiatus is the treatment of choice.
Is routine ureteral stent placement required after ureteroscopic lithotripsy?  [PDF]
Ferhat Ate?,Cüneyt Adayener,?lker Akyol,Kenan Karademir
Medical Journal of Bakirk?y , 2010,
Abstract: Objective: We aimed to search for the outcome of the ureteroscopic procedures performed for ureteral stones at our department, and discuss the necessity of intraoperative ureteral stent placement. Material and Methods: One hundred and sixtyone cases who underwent ureteroscopic ureterolithotripsy between the years 2004 and 2007 were evaluated in terms of location and size of the stones, pre and postoperative ureteral and calyceal dilatation, use of ureteral stents, and the outcome. Results: Our series included 121 males and 40 females whose mean age was 37,4±16,2 years. Eightyfour and 71 of the stones were on the right and left sides respectively whereas 6 patients had bilateral. Stones were located in the lower, middle, and upper part of the ureter in 84, 67, and 10 patients, respectively. Sixtyfive of the cases had proximal dilatation. Stones were ≥10 mm in 63 patients. Ureteral stents were placed in 22 patients due to the ureteral strictures or traumatic procedure. Ureteral stents were not required in 145 cases who did not have above-mentioned indications. A direct urinary system radiograph for residual fragments on the first postoperative day, and an ultrasound for upper tract dilatation on the 15th postoperative day and thirth month were obtained. Of the patients in whom no ureteral stent was placed intraoperatively, 3 needed stents due to severe pain and/or persistent upper tract dilatation (suspicion for obstruction) postoperatively. Conclusion: Routine intraoperative ureteral stent use during a ureteroscopic lithotripsy is not required except for traumatic procedures and patients with severe ureteral strictures. This is a cost-effective approach as well.
Repeat knot formation in a patient with an indwelling ureteral stent
Eisner, Brian;Kim, Howard;Sacco, Dianne;
International braz j urol , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S1677-55382006000300009
Abstract: a patient treated for nephrolithiasis formed knots in 2 occasions, in 2 separate indwelling ureteral stents. this rare complication may make stent removal difficult. to our knowledge, this is the first case report of repeat knot formation in a single patient.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.