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Alveolar adenoma: A rare lung tumor  [PDF]
Stoj?i? Jelena,Milenkovi? Branislava,Radoji?i? Jelena,Per?inkovski Malina
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo , 2007, DOI: 10.2298/sarh0708461s
Abstract: Introduction Alveolar adenoma belongs to the group of benign epithelial tumors. Histogenesis of alveolar adenoma is a combination of proliferation of alveolar pneumocytes and fibrous tissue originating from septal mesenchyma. Case outline A sixty-nine-year old female patient was hospitalized for clinical examination and surgery of well defined and homogenous timorous lesion in the right middle lobe causing pleural pain. Bronchoscopic examination with biopsy did not resolve etiology of the disease. Tumorectomy was performed. Timorous nodule had a multicystic appearance and histologically, histochemically and immunohistochemically, an alveolar adenoma was estimated. Five years after surgery, the patient feels well, without respiratory symptoms and signs of recurrence or malignant alteration, respectively. Conclusion Alveolar adenoma is a rare benign lung tumor, most frequently presented as a solitary pulmonary nodule. After complete surgery, the tumor neither relapses nor malignantly alters. Surgical excision is curative. It is necessary to take into consideration alveolar adenoma, too, when a solitary pulmonary nodule is diagnosed.
CD34 Expression in the Stromal Cells of Alveolar Adenoma
Nicolina De Rosa,Alfonso Maiorino,Ilaria De Rosa,Carlo Curcio,Carmine Sellitto,Dario Amore
Case Reports in Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/913517
Abstract: The alveolar adenoma of the lung is a rare benign tumor characterized by a proliferation of both the alveolar epithelial cells and the mesenchymal septal cells. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial cells stain for cytokeratin (CK) AE1AE3, CK7, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), and surfactant apoprotein confirming the derivation by the type 2 pneumocytes. The stromal cells are negative for these markers but they show focally smooth muscle and muscle-specific actin positivity. We describe two cases that showed immunohistochemically a CD34 positivity of the mesenchymal septal cells. This aspect has been previously described in a two cases report, but not emphasized by the authors as a distinctive feature of the lesion. We consider this CD34 positivity as a marker of immaturity or stemness of the lesional septal spindle cells, that could be responsible of the different phenotypic and morphological profile of the interstitial cells, that could be, therefore, considered neoplastic and not reactive.
CD34 Expression in the Stromal Cells of Alveolar Adenoma  [PDF]
Nicolina De Rosa,Alfonso Maiorino,Ilaria De Rosa,Carlo Curcio,Carmine Sellitto,Dario Amore
Case Reports in Medicine , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/913517
Abstract: The alveolar adenoma of the lung is a rare benign tumor characterized by a proliferation of both the alveolar epithelial cells and the mesenchymal septal cells. Immunohistochemically, the epithelial cells stain for cytokeratin (CK) AE1AE3, CK7, thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF1), and surfactant apoprotein confirming the derivation by the type 2 pneumocytes. The stromal cells are negative for these markers but they show focally smooth muscle and muscle-specific actin positivity. We describe two cases that showed immunohistochemically a CD34 positivity of the mesenchymal septal cells. This aspect has been previously described in a two cases report, but not emphasized by the authors as a distinctive feature of the lesion. We consider this CD34 positivity as a marker of immaturity or stemness of the lesional septal spindle cells, that could be responsible of the different phenotypic and morphological profile of the interstitial cells, that could be, therefore, considered neoplastic and not reactive. 1. Introduction Alveolar adenomas are rare benign peripheral lung tumors first described by Yousem and Hochholzer [1]. Only a few have been reported since [2–12] This neoplasm presents as a solitary peripheral lesion discovered incidentally on chest radiographs. Macroscopically these tumours manifest as well-demarcated spongy nodules with average size of 1.9?cm, which may be located in any lobe beneath an intact pleura. Microscopically, they possess unique histological characteristics, which allow diagnosis by light microscopy alone: the cystic spaces dominate the picture, with the larger cysts usually concentrated in the middle of the tumour. The alveolar lumina contain few histiocytes, erythrocytes, and an eosinophilic proteinaceous granular material. The cysts are lined with a single layer of epithelial cells, with most of them being cuboidal or “hob nailed” in appearance and eosinophilic, finely vacuolated, or foamy cytoplasm, consisting in type 2 pneumocytes as showed by immunohistochemical and ultrastructural studies [1, 5, 6]. The interstitial component varies from a thin connective tissue layer resembling normal alveolar septa to markedly thickened alveolar walls with prominent spindle/oval-shaped cells containing a few mixed macrophages, plasma cells, and lymphocytes. The prognosis is favourable and conservative surgical excision is curative. 2. Cases Reports 2.1. Clinical Findigs Case 1 A 24-year-old, nonsmoker man underwent a chest X-ray, during a clinical screening before employment in the army, that occasionally revealed a solitary peripheral
An unusual case of a microscopic alveolar adenoma coexisting with lung carcinoma: a case report and review of the literature
Tapan Bhavsar, Guldeep Uppal, John M Travaline, Colleen Gaughan, Yajue Huang, Jasvir S Khurana
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-5-187
Abstract: A 59-year-old Caucasian man with a medical history of smoking and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was incidentally found to have a right upper lobe mass while undergoing a computed tomographic chest scan as part of a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease clinical trial. Our patient underwent a right upper lobectomy after a bronchoscopic biopsy of the mass revealed the mass to be a carcinoma. A pathological examination revealed an incidental, small, 0.2 cm, well circumscribed lesion on the staple line margin of the lobectomy in addition to the carcinoma. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations revealed the lesion to be an alveolar adenoma.We report the rare presentation of a microscopic alveolar adenoma coexisting with lung carcinoma. Alveolar adenoma is an entirely benign incidental neoplasm that can be precisely diagnosed using immunohistochemical analysis in addition to its unique histopathological characteristics.Alveolar adenomas (AAs) or 'Yousem's tumors', first described by Yousem and Hochholzer in 1986 [1], are pulmonary tumors of uncertain histogenesis. Several types of pulmonary adenomas are recognized by the revised World Health Organization/International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer classification [2]. AAs are characterized by proliferation of type II alveolar epithelium and septal mesenchyma [3]. They are histologically benign, and recurrence after resection has never been reported [4-6]. AAs are detected incidentally as isolated coin lesions on routine chest radiographs [4,7]; however, at times, they are difficult to differentiate from the early stages of lung cancer. They usually occur in the middle and lower lobes of middle-aged and older women [8]. AAs have a characteristic multi-cystic histology resembling normal lung parenchyma. They are well demarcated peripheral pulmonary lesions composed of a network of spaces lined with simple cuboidal epithelium that contain stroma ranging from thin, inconspicuous strands of co
Alveolar adenoma of the lung: unusual diagnosis of a lesion positive on PET scan. A case report
Mario Nosotti, Paolo Mendogni, Lorenzo Rosso, Davide Tosi, Alessandro Palleschi, Maria Basciu, Luigi Santambrogio, Stefano Ferrero
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1749-8090-7-1
Abstract: The present clinical case was singular for the deep location of the nodule and its tight adhesion to left inferior pulmonary vein requiring a lobectomy. In addition, alveolar adenoma PET behaviour has been reported as light positivity.Alveolar adenoma is a rare lung neoplasm and few cases have been reported in literature. Such lesions are considered as benign neoplasm and no recurrences have been described. These neoplasms are usually located peripherally in the lung and their PET activities are unknown.We report the first case of alveolar adenoma positive on PET scan, deeply located in left lower lobe.A 54-year-old, non-smoker woman presented to her primary care physician for chronic, non-productive cough and mild dyspnoea. Her past medical history included partial gastrectomy for gastric ulcer, colecystectomy, dyslipidemia and gastric reflux disease. She also reported a previous occupational exposure to benzene.Clinical examination was unremarkable and pulmonary function was normal. The chest X-ray and the subsequent enhanced chest computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the presence of a well-circumscribed, ovular, smooth edged, dense pulmonary lesion in the left inferior hilum (Figure 1). The diameter of the nodule was approximately 18 mm, with no contrast enhancement. No other significant abnormalities were detected, in particular there was neither pleural effusion nor mediastinal adenopathy. The patient underwent a fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scan, revealing minor uptake in the left lower lobe nodule with a Standardized Uptake Value of 1.06. The brain and the abdomen CT scans were negative for metastatic localizations.In order to exclude a malignancy, a fibreoptic bronchoscopy with bronchial washing and a percutaneous CT-guided fine needle aspiration biopsy were performed. Both the examinations resulted negative for malignant disease.Notwithstanding the negative results of the cytological investigations, the PET finding and
Pleomorphic adenoma
M Sikudhani
Dar Es Salaam Medical Students' Journal , 2010,
Abstract: Pleomophic adenoma is a mixed benign tumor which is the most common of all salivary gland neoplasms. It’s most common location is the parotid gland (85%). This tumor is mostly diagnosed in the 4th-6th decades of life.
Mediastinal parathyroid adenoma  [cached]
Al-Mashat Faisal,Sibiany Abdulrahman,Faleh Doaa,Kary Kholood
Saudi Journal of Kidney Diseases and Transplantation , 2009,
Abstract: We present two cases that developed clinical, biochemical and radiological evidences of primary and secondary hyperparathyroidism. In the first case the adenoma was removed through a transcervical incision and in the second case the supernumerary adenoma was removed through sternotomy. Post operatively, patients had normal serum calcium and iPTH with complete disappearance of symptoms.
Pleomorphic Adenoma of the Upper Lip  [cached]
ülkü Kü?üK,Serdar TAN
Türk Patoloji Dergisi , 2011,
Abstract: Pleomorphic adenoma is the most common neoplasm of the salivary glands and is most commonly located in the parotis followed by the submandibular glands. Its localization in the minor salivary glands is mostly reported in the palate. Few publications report pleomorphic adenoma cases located in the lip.We present a 35-year-old male patient with a pleomorphic adenoma located in the upper lip.
Intrathymic Parathyroid Adenoma  [PDF]
Ibrahim Issoufou, Laila Belliraj, Sani Rabiou, Jamal Ghalimi, Meryem Rchachi, Marouane Lakranbi, Farida Ajdi, Yassine Ouadnouni, Mohamed Smahi
Case Reports in Clinical Medicine (CRCM) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/crcm.2015.48059
Abstract: Introduction: Mediastinal parathyroid adenoma localization is a rare entity. We report a case of excision by manubriotomy of intrathymic parathyroid adenoma detected by Computed Tomography scan of the chest and neck and confirmed by Technetium-99 m-sestamibi scan (99 mTc-MIBI). Case Presentation: A 68 years old woman with history of hypercalcaemia, PTH elevation and operation for pathological fracture of the left femur 7 days before was presented to our service. The patient underwent manubriotomy and the adenoma was found within the right lobe of the thymus gland. Conclusion: The Technetium-99 m-sestamibi scan evaluation can be useful in the preoperative localization of ectopic parathyroid adenomas. The surgical approach by manubriotomy is privileged when the ectopic adenoma is in the upper part of anterior mediastinum.
Pleomorphic adenoma of the hard palate
Kaur S,Thami G,Nagarkar N
Indian Journal of Dermatology, Venereology and Leprology , 2003,
Abstract: Pleomorphic adenoma is a benign tumor of the salivary glands that has elements of both epithelial and mesenchymal tissues. The tumor most commonly arises in the parotid or submandibular glands. Infrequently, it may arise from the minor salivary glands and present as an intraoral mass over the palate or lip. We report a patient with pleomorphic adenoma over the hard palate, which resembled common intraoral diseases like condyloma acuminata, oral papilloma and squamous cell carcinoma.
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