oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Interactive Building  [PDF]
Henriette Bier
Advances in Internet of Things (AIT) , 2012, DOI: 10.4236/ait.2012.24011
Abstract: Distributed, networked, electronically tagged, interactive devices are increasingly incorporated into the physical environment blurring progressively the boundary between physical and virtual space. This changing relationship between physical and virtual implies not only a change in the operation and use of buildings but also a change in their physical configuration, and therefore, their design and production. Interactive building addresses, therefore both the building defined as physically built environment and the building process implying on the one hand the changing role of architecture with respect to incorporation of interactivity and the resulting multiple and varied use of built environments in reduced timeframes; On the other hand, it is implying the changing role of the architect with respect to the use of networks connecting digital databases and parametric models with customizable design and production tools allowing for linking design to production and use. This paper discusses both by presenting two case studies within the larger framework of interactive building.
Interactive Information Retrieval: Context and Basic Notions  [PDF]
David Robins
Informing Science The International Journal of an Emerging Transdiscipline , 2000,
Abstract: his paper provides an introduction to interactive information retrieval--the study of human interaction with information retrieval systems. Interactive information retrieval may be contrasted with the "system-centered" view of information retrieval in which changes to information retrieval system variables are manipulated in isolation from users in laboratory situations. The paper elucidates current models of interactive information retrieval, namely, the episodic model, the stratified model, the interactive feedback and search process model, and the global model of polyrepresentation. Future directions for research in the field are discussed.
Script Handbook for Interactive Scientific Website Building  [PDF]
Chung-Lin Shan
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: In this script handbook, we collect the basic (and partially upgraded) PHP scripts used for building the AMIDAS website (http://pisrv0.pit.physik.uni-tuebingen.de/darkmatter/amidas/), an online interactive simulation/data analysis system for direct Dark Matter detection experiments and phenomenology. In this (1.73205) version, we add more materials and improve the scripts for offering a more convenient, comfortable and user-friendly environment on interactive scientific computing websites. Some basic, often used commands of (X)HTML, CSS, JavaScript, HTML DOM, and PHP are also given in Appendix. Online demonstrations and downloadable template scripts are given on http://www.tir.tw/iswb/ss2012/templates.php.
Eye Gaze Assistance for a Game-Like Interactive Task  [PDF]
Tamás (Tom) D. Gedeon,Dingyun Zhu,B. Sumudu U. Mendis
International Journal of Computer Games Technology , 2008, DOI: 10.1155/2008/623725
Abstract: Human beings communicate in abbreviated ways dependent on prior interactions and shared knowledge. Furthermore, humans share information about intentions and future actions using eye gaze. Among primates, humans are unique in the whiteness of the sclera and amount of sclera shown, essential for communication via interpretation of eye gaze. This paper extends our previous work in a game-like interactive task by the use of computerised recognition of eye gaze and fuzzy signature-based interpretation of possible intentions. This extends our notion of robot instinctive behaviour to intentional behaviour. We show a good improvement of speed of response in a simple use of eye gaze information. We also show a significant and more sophisticated use of the eye gaze information, which eliminates the need for control actions on the user's part. We also make a suggestion as to returning visibility of control to the user in these cases.
Relationships between Reward Sensitivity, Risk-Taking and Family History of Alcoholism during an Interactive Competitive fMRI Task  [PDF]
Haley L. Yarosh, Christopher J. Hyatt, Shashwath A. Meda, Rachel Jiantonio-Kelly, Marc N. Potenza, Michal Assaf, Godfrey D.Pearlson
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0088188
Abstract: Background Individuals with a positive family history for alcoholism (FHP) have shown differences from family-history-negative (FHN) individuals in the neural correlates of reward processing. FHP, compared to FHN individuals, demonstrate relatively diminished ventral striatal activation during anticipation of monetary rewards, and the degree of ventral striatal activation shows an inverse correlation with specific impulsivity measures in alcohol-dependent individuals. Rewards in socially interactive contexts relate importantly to addictive propensities, yet have not been examined with respect to how their neural underpinnings relate to impulsivity-related measures. Here we describe impulsivity measures in FHN and FHP individuals as they relate to a socially interactive functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) task. Methods Forty FHP and 29 FHN subjects without histories of Axis-I disorders completed a socially interactive Domino task during functional magnetic resonance imaging and completed self-report and behavioral impulsivity-related assessments. Results FHP compared to FHN individuals showed higher scores (p = .004) on one impulsivity-related factor relating to both compulsivity (Padua Inventory) and reward/punishment sensitivity (Sensitivity to Punishment/Sensitivity to Reward Questionnaire). Multiple regression analysis within a reward-related network revealed a correlation between risk-taking (involving another impulsivity-related factor, the Balloon Analog Risk Task (BART)) and right ventral striatum activation under reward >punishment contrast (p<0.05 FWE corrected) in the social task. Conclusions Behavioral risk-taking scores may be more closely associated with neural correlates of reward responsiveness in socially interactive contexts than are FH status or impulsivity-related self-report measures. These findings suggest that risk-taking assessments be examined further in socially interactive settings relevant to addictive behaviors.
A Framework for Building an Interactive Satellite TV Based M-Learning Environment  [cached]
Ghassan Issa,Shakir M. Hussain,Hussein Al-Bahadili
International Journal of Interactive Mobile Technologies (iJIM) , 2010, DOI: 10.3991/ijim.v4i3.1295
Abstract: This paper presents a description of an interactive satellite TV based mobile learning (STV-ML) framework, in which a satellite TV station is used as an integral part of a comprehensive interactive mobile learning (M-Learning) environment. The proposed framework assists in building a reliable, efficient, and cost-effective environment to meet the growing demands of M-Learning all over the world, especially in developing countries. It utilizes recent advances in satellite reception, broadcasting technologies, and interactive TV to facilitate the delivery of gigantic learning materials. This paper also proposed a simple and flexible three-phase implementation methodology which includes construction of earth station, expansion of broadcasting channels, and developing true user interactivity. The proposed framework and implementation methodology ensure the construction of a true, reliable, and cost effective M-Learning system that can be used efficiently and effectively by a wide range of users and educational institutions to deliver ubiquitous learning.
Development of an Instructional Model for Online Task-Based Interactive Listening for EFL Learners  [cached]
Xingbin Tian,Suksan Suppasetseree
English Language Teaching , 2013, DOI: 10.5539/elt.v6n3p30
Abstract: College English in China has shifted from cultivating reading ability to comprehensive communicative abilities with an emphasis on listening and speaking. For this reason, new teaching models should be built on modern information technology. However, little research on developing models for the online teaching of listening skills has been conducted. Thus, the present study aims at developing an instructional model for online task-based interactive listening (OTIL Model) for English as a Foreign Language (EFL) learners and investigating the effects of using OTIL. First, researcher constructed the OTIL Model by analyzing and synthesizing four effective and manageable instructional design models. Subsequently, three experts in the field of instructional systems design and English language teaching evaluated the OTIL Model. Next, two non-English major intact classes at Tongren University, China (TU), were employed in the experiment by using OTIL designed based on the developed OTIL Model. Additionally, the results of the two classes were compared by pre- and post-tests, revealing a significant difference in the post-test score between the experimental and control classes (P=0.000, P?0.05). The results seem to suggest that the OTIL Model can be served to promote students’ listening ability.
An interactive integrative approach to translating knowledge and building a "learning organization" in health services management
Chunharas,Somsak;
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006, DOI: 10.1590/S0042-96862006000800017
Abstract: this paper proposes a basic approach to ensuring that knowledge from research studies is translated for use in health services management with a view towards building a "learning organization". (a learning organization is one in which the environment is structured in such a way as to facilitate learning as well as the sharing of knowledge among members or employees.) this paper highlights various dimensions that determine the complexity of knowledge translation, using the problem-solving cycle as the backbone for gaining a better understanding of how different types of knowledge interact in health services management. it is essential to use an integrated and interactive approach to ensure that knowledge from research is translated in a way that allows a learning organization to be built and that knowledge is not used merely to influence a single decision in isolation from the overall services and management of an organization.
An interactive integrative approach to translating knowledge and building a "learning organization" in health services management  [cached]
Chunharas Somsak
Bulletin of the World Health Organization , 2006,
Abstract: This paper proposes a basic approach to ensuring that knowledge from research studies is translated for use in health services management with a view towards building a "learning organization". (A learning organization is one in which the environment is structured in such a way as to facilitate learning as well as the sharing of knowledge among members or employees.) This paper highlights various dimensions that determine the complexity of knowledge translation, using the problem-solving cycle as the backbone for gaining a better understanding of how different types of knowledge interact in health services management. It is essential to use an integrated and interactive approach to ensure that knowledge from research is translated in a way that allows a learning organization to be built and that knowledge is not used merely to influence a single decision in isolation from the overall services and management of an organization.
Monkeys Monitor Human Goals in a Nonmatch-to-Goal Interactive Task  [PDF]
Rossella Falcone, Emiliano Brunamonti, Stefano Ferraina, Aldo Genovesio
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0032209
Abstract: We designed a new task, called nonmatch-to-goal, to study the ability of macaque monkeys to interact with humans in a rule-guided paradigm. In this task the monkeys were required to choose one of two targets, from a list of three. For each choice, they were required to switch from their choice on the previous trial to a different one. In a subset of trials the monkeys observed a human partner performing the task. When the human concluded his turn, the monkeys were required to switch to a new goal discarding the human's previous goal. We found that monkeys were very skillful in monitoring goals, not only of their own choice by also those of their human partner. They showed also a surprising ability to coordinate their actions, taking turns with the human partner, starting and stopping their own turn following the decision of the human partner in the task.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.