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Dyadic coping, quality of life, and psychological distress among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and their partners  [cached]
Meier C,Bodenmann G,Moergeli H,Jenewein J
International Journal of COPD , 2011,
Abstract: Caroline Meier1, Guy Bodenmann2, Hanspeter M rgeli1, Josef Jenewein11Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland; 2Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, SwitzerlandBackground: Successfully coping with a chronic disease depends significantly on social support, particularly that of a significant other. Thus, it depends on the ways of dealing with stress within a couple (dyadic coping). In this study, the relationship between dyadic coping and well-being was investigated among couples in which one partner suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).Methods: A total of 43 couples participated. They were mailed questionnaires on anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-BREF), and dyadic coping (Dyadic Coping Inventory).Results: Low scores of positive and high scores of negative dyadic coping were associated with poorer quality of life and higher psychological distress among couples. Delegated coping (assistance with daily tasks) was higher among partners. When estimated by patients, high delegated partner coping (frequent provision of support by partners) and low delegated personal coping (low provision of support by patients) were associated with poorer quality of life for both patient and partner. COPD patients suffering from depression were supported more often and attributed deficits in dyadic coping primarily to themselves, whereas partners with higher scores of depression provided higher estimates of both their own negative coping and the negative coping of their partner.Conclusion: The higher the patient perceived the imbalance in delegated dyadic coping, the lower the couple's quality of life. More negative and less positive dyadic coping were associated with lower quality of life and higher psychological distress. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve dyadic coping may lead to better quality of life and less psychological distress among COPD patients and their partners.Keywords: COPD, dyadic coping, partner study, quality of life, anxiety, depression
Dyadic coping, quality of life, and psychological distress among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and their partners
Meier C, Bodenmann G, Moergeli H, Jenewein J
International Journal of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S24508
Abstract: dic coping, quality of life, and psychological distress among chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients and their partners Original Research (3010) Total Article Views Authors: Meier C, Bodenmann G, Moergeli H, Jenewein J Published Date November 2011 Volume 2011:6 Pages 583 - 596 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COPD.S24508 Caroline Meier1, Guy Bodenmann2, Hanspeter M rgeli1, Josef Jenewein1 1Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, University Hospital Zurich, Switzerland; 2Institute of Psychology, University of Zurich, Switzerland Background: Successfully coping with a chronic disease depends significantly on social support, particularly that of a significant other. Thus, it depends on the ways of dealing with stress within a couple (dyadic coping). In this study, the relationship between dyadic coping and well-being was investigated among couples in which one partner suffers from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods: A total of 43 couples participated. They were mailed questionnaires on anxiety and depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire-BREF), and dyadic coping (Dyadic Coping Inventory). Results: Low scores of positive and high scores of negative dyadic coping were associated with poorer quality of life and higher psychological distress among couples. Delegated coping (assistance with daily tasks) was higher among partners. When estimated by patients, high delegated partner coping (frequent provision of support by partners) and low delegated personal coping (low provision of support by patients) were associated with poorer quality of life for both patient and partner. COPD patients suffering from depression were supported more often and attributed deficits in dyadic coping primarily to themselves, whereas partners with higher scores of depression provided higher estimates of both their own negative coping and the negative coping of their partner. Conclusion: The higher the patient perceived the imbalance in delegated dyadic coping, the lower the couple's quality of life. More negative and less positive dyadic coping were associated with lower quality of life and higher psychological distress. Psychotherapeutic interventions to improve dyadic coping may lead to better quality of life and less psychological distress among COPD patients and their partners.
The Relation of Sleep, Distress, and Coping Strategies—What Male and Female Students Can Learn from Each Other?  [PDF]
Jasmin Faber, Angelika A. Schlarb
Health (Health) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/health.2016.813136
Abstract: Sleep quality, distress, and coping strategies differ between male and female students. However, effects of gender on their relation have not been evaluated. Therefore, the primary aim of this study was to confirm gender differences on sleep quality, chronic distress, and various coping strategies, as well as to examine gender differences in their relation to each other. A cross-sectional online study including several sleep-related self-report measures was completed by 6379 German students. After excluding all cases with missing data on the variables gender, psychiatric disorder, and medication, the final sample consisted of 5889 students with a mean age of 23.10 years (SD = 2.67) for men and 22.64 years (SD = 2.56) for women. Data from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, the Trier Inventory for Chronic Stress, and the Proactive Coping Inventory were analyzed. Results showed that women reported to have a poorer sleep quality, a higher level of chronic distress, and use social support more often than men. The hypothesized model revealed gender differences on the model level. However, these differences only occurred between avoidance coping and distress, as well as between various coping strategies. The biological gender influenced each of those three variables, but barely their relation to each other. Participants’ gender role might explain gender differences in coping strategies and their impact on distress. Furthermore, the type of stressor and subjective or objective measured sleep parameters might show more gender differences on this relation. Conclusively, gender-specific trainings or interventions are not necessary, however, gender differences should be considered during the implementation process.
Can Healthy Fetuses Show Facial Expressions of “Pain” or “Distress”?  [PDF]
Nadja Reissland, Brian Francis, James Mason
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0065530
Abstract: Background With advances of research on fetal behavioural development, the question of whether we can identify fetal facial expressions and determine their developmental progression, takes on greater importance. In this study we investigate longitudinally the increasing complexity of combinations of facial movements from 24 to 36 weeks gestation in a sample of healthy fetuses using frame-by-frame coding of 4-D ultrasound scans. The primary aim was to examine whether these complex facial movements coalesce into a recognisable facial expression of pain/distress. Methodology/Findings Fifteen fetuses (8 girls, 7 boys) were observed four times in the second and third trimester of pregnancy. Fetuses showed significant progress towards more complex facial expressions as gestational age increased. Statistical analysis of the facial movements making up a specific facial configuration namely “pain/distress” also demonstrates that this facial expression becomes significantly more complete as the fetus matures. Conclusions/Significance The study shows that one can determine the normal progression of fetal facial movements. Furthermore, our results suggest that healthy fetuses progress towards an increasingly complete pain/distress expression as they mature. We argue that this is an adaptive process which is beneficial to the fetus postnatally and has the potential to identify normal versus abnormal developmental pathways.
Cognitive coping strategies, emotional distress and quality of life in mothers of children with ASD and ADHD—A comparative study in a Romanian population sample  [PDF]
Elena Predescu, Roxana ?ipo?
Open Journal of Psychiatry (OJPsych) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ojpsych.2013.32A003
Abstract:

The Quality of Life (QoL) represents a dimension of the overall status and of the wellbeing that might be influenced by various factors. Mothers’ emotional and behavioral reactions, when having a child with diagnosis of mental disorder, are different depending on the emotional distress and cognitive coping strategies used. The aim of this study was to assess the cognitive coping strategies, emotional distress and the relationship between them and the quality of life in mothers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) compared to mothers of children with Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). Data were collected from 114 mothers of children with diagnosis of ASD or ADHD. Different psychological measurements have been used in order to assess the quality of life (Family Quality of Life Survey) cognitive coping strategies (Cognitive-Emotional Regulation Questionnaire) and emotional distress (Profile of Affective Distress) of the parents. For QOL and emotional distress, we didn’t find significant differences between the two groups. The coping strategies of the mothers of children with ASD that significantly correlated with the overall assessment of the family quality were: positive refocusing, positive reevaluation and catastrophizing. The results suggest that the use of adaptive coping strategies correlates with a higher family quality of life, while for the maladaptive ones, the relationship is reversed.

Impacto do coping proactivo, do distress emocional e da auto-estima na funcionalidade e qualidade de vida de pessoas com esquizofrenia
Salgado,Diana; Rocha,Nuno; Marques,António;
Psicologia, Saúde & Doen?as , 2008,
Abstract: the aim of this study was to examine the relative associations between proactive coping skills, emotional distress, selfesteem, functioning and quality of life among persons diagnosed with schizophrenia. twenty three persons diagnosed with schizophrenia were assessed with the following instruments: quality of life scale from the world health organization, life skills profile, proactive coping inventory, anxiety, depression and stress scale, and rosenberg self-esteem scale. through correlative analysis we found that proactive coping, reflective coping, strategic planning and preventive coping correlated positively with different dimensions of functioning and quality of life. avoidant coping wasn?t correlated with any functional outcome. we also didn?t found significant correlations between distress symptoms, functioning and quality of life, excepting depressive symptoms, which were correlated with communication skills and social relationships, and stress symptoms, which significantly correlated with the psychological domain of quality of life. self-esteem was positively associated with several domains of quality of life but not with objective dimensions of functioning.
American Ethnicity in Postnational Perspective  [cached]
Craig Nation
Scienza & Politica : per una Storia delle Dottrine , 1995, DOI: 10.6092/issn.1825-9618/2971
Abstract: American Ethnicity in Postnational Perspective
Estrés organizacional y salud en funcionarios de centros de atención primaria de una comuna de Santiago Perceived work characteristics and coping strategies that predict distress among workers at primary health care centers  [cached]
Eliana Guic S,Pablo Mora O,Ricardo Rey C,Alfonso Robles G
Revista médica de Chile , 2006,
Abstract: Background: Demands on primary health care services in Chile are increasing. The staff perception of specific sources of tension at work is not known. This knowledge is necessary to avoid preventable health problems caused by distress. Aim: To identify specific work stressors in primary health care facilities and to examine individual characteristics that could mediate their effects on health. Material and Methods: We evaluated organizational stressors (Perceived Work Characteristics for Health Services Survey), personal characteristics (Work Locus of Control Scale, Ways of Coping Check List) and distress (Goldberg General Health Questionnaire, Cooper Stress Symptoms Checklist) in a representative sample of 129 workers of 5 public Primary Health Care Centers of a borough in Santiago. Results: Women and non-professional personnel reported more psychological and physical stress symptoms. Regression analysis showed that work stressors significantly explained the variance of psychological (26%) and physical (28%) distress symptoms. Perception of more role conflicts, less support of peers and superiors and less workload were predictors significantly associated with higher stress outcomes. Avoidance coping strategies were associated with more distress and mediated the effect of organizational stressors on health. Conclusions: We identified the groups at risk of stress in Primary Health Care Centers and specific sources of tension in the organization, as well as individual risk factors. Both should be addressed in interventions to reduce distress and prevent consequences on health
Interpretation of illness in cancer survivors is associated with health-related variables and adaptive coping styles
Arndt Büssing, Julia Fischer
BMC Women's Health , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1472-6874-9-2
Abstract: In an anonymous cross-sectional survey, we analyzed the interpretations of disease (according to Lipowski's eight 'meaning of illness' categories) in 387 patients with cancer (81% breast cancer). To make statements about their conceptual relationships with health-related variables, we correlated the 8 items of the 'Interpretation of Illness' questionnaire (IIQ) with health-related quality of life, anxiety/depression, fatigue, life satisfaction, and adaptive coping strategies.Most cancer survivors regarded their disease as a challenge (52%), others as value (38%) or even an interruption of life (irreparable loss; 35%); weakness/failure (5%) and punishment (3%) were rated the lowest. The fatalistic negative interpretations 'interruption/loss' and 'enemy/threat' were inversely correlated with mental health-related quality of life and life satisfaction, and positively with an escape-avoidance strategy, depression and anxiety. In contrast, positive disease interpretations (i.e., 'challenge' and 'value') correlated only with adaptive coping strategies. Physical health correlated with none of the disease interpretations.Despite conceptual limitations, the 8-item schema could be regarded as a useful screening approach to identify patients at risk for reduced psychosocial functioning.Among the numerous ways to cope with disease, two general strategies can be distinguished: problem-solving (i.e., do something active to avoid stressful circumstances) and emotion-focused coping strategies (i.e., try to regulate the emotional consequences of stressful or potentially stressful events). Folkman and Lazarus found that both types were used to face stressful situations [1]. Carver et al. differentiated active and avoidant coping strategies, among them 'Resignation/Acceptance' (i.e., accepting the fact that the stressful event has occurred and is real) and 'Focus on and Venting of Emotions' (i.e., increased awareness of one's emotional distress, and concomitant tendency to ventilate o
Emotion regulation in patients with rheumatic diseases: validity and responsiveness of the Emotional Approach Coping Scale (EAC)
Heidi A Zangi, Andrew Garratt, K?re Hagen, Annette L Stanton, Petter Mowinckel, Arnstein Finset
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-10-107
Abstract: 220 patients with different rheumatic diseases were included in a cross-sectional study in which data quality and internal consistency were assessed. Construct validity was assessed through comparisons with the Brief Approach/Avoidance Coping Questionnaire (BACQ) and the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-20). Responsiveness was tested in a longitudinal pretest-posttest study of two different coping interventions, the Vitality Training Program (VTP) and a Self-Management Program (SMP).The EAC had low levels of missing data. Results from principal component analysis supported two subscales, Emotional Expression and Emotional Processing, which had high Cronbach's alphas of 0.90 and 0.92, respectively. The EAC had correlations with approach-oriented items in the BACQ in the range 0.17-0.50. The EAC Expression scale had a significant negative correlation with the GHQ-20 of -0.13. As hypothesized, participation in the VTP significantly improved EAC scores, indicating responsiveness to change.The EAC is an acceptable and valid instrument for measuring emotional processing and expression in patients with rheumatic diseases. The EAC scales were responsive to change in an intervention designed to promote emotion regulation. The instrument has not yet been tested for test-retest reliability, which is recommended in future studies.Chronic rheumatic diseases often have an important impact on physical, as well as psychological and social aspects of patients' lives. Such long-term stressors that have uncontrollable elements can place great emotional demands on the individual. Research has documented a high degree of depression, anxiety and psychological distress in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and other rheumatic diseases [1-6].There are individual differences in how patients cope with various symptoms and adjust to the burden of the disease. In early stages of the disease emotional distress is associated with levels of pain and fatigue, functional status, disease impac
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