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Awareness of Iron Deficiency Anemia among Women of Reproductive Age in Hubei Province, China  [PDF]
Tabish Hussain,Li Yu Shu
Asian Journal of Medical Sciences , 2010, DOI: 10.3126/ajms.v1i1.2607
Abstract: Objective: To assess the level of awareness about causes, prevention and treatment of iron deficiency anemia among women of reproductive age in Hubei province, a south eastern province of China.
Iron deficiency anemia in Tarahumara women of reproductive-age in Northern Mexico
Monárrez-Espino,Joel; Martínez,Homero; Greiner,Ted;
Salud Pública de México , 2001, DOI: 10.1590/S0036-36342001000500002
Abstract: objective. to determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (ida) among tarahumara women of reproductive age. material and methods. a cross-sectional survey was conducted in a representative sample of 481 women aged 12-49 years, residents of guachochi municipality, chihuahua, from june to september 1998. the hemoglobin (hb) level was measured in capillary blood using the hemocue technique, and the serum ferritin level in capillary serum spotted on filter paper, in a sub-sample of women. central tendency and dispersion measures were estimated; the chisquared test was used to test differences in proportions and anova and bonferroni's test for differences in means. results. prevalence of anemia (mean hb±s.d.) was 16.1% (140±16 g/l) and 25.7% (129±12 g/l) for non-pregnant and pregnant women, respectively. pregnant women in the 3rd trimester and those who were breast-feeding their children during the first 6 months after delivery had the highest prevalence of anemia (38.5% and 42.9%, respectively). iron deficiency was responsible for most of the anemia found in this sample. conclusions. this study provides relevant information for the development of intervention programs to treat and prevent ida in this ethnic group. the english version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html
Iron deficiency anemia in Tarahumara women of reproductive-age in Northern Mexico  [cached]
Monárrez-Espino Joel,Martínez Homero,Greiner Ted
Salud Pública de México , 2001,
Abstract: Objective. To determine the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia (IDA) among Tarahumara women of reproductive age. Material and Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a representative sample of 481 women aged 12-49 years, residents of Guachochi Municipality, Chihuahua, from June to September 1998. The hemoglobin (Hb) level was measured in capillary blood using the Hemocue technique, and the serum ferritin level in capillary serum spotted on filter paper, in a sub-sample of women. Central tendency and dispersion measures were estimated; the Chisquared test was used to test differences in proportions and ANOVA and Bonferroni's test for differences in means. Results. Prevalence of anemia (mean Hb±S.D.) was 16.1% (140±16 g/l) and 25.7% (129±12 g/l) for non-pregnant and pregnant women, respectively. Pregnant women in the 3rd trimester and those who were breast-feeding their children during the first 6 months after delivery had the highest prevalence of anemia (38.5% and 42.9%, respectively). Iron deficiency was responsible for most of the anemia found in this sample. Conclusions. This study provides relevant information for the development of intervention programs to treat and prevent IDA in this ethnic group. The English version of this paper is available too at: http://www.insp.mx/salud/index.html
IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA; ROLE OF NUTRITIONAL DEPRIVATION AMONG FEMALE PATIENTS OF REPRODUCTIVE AGE GROUP
SHEZADI SABAH,MUSARAT RAMZAN
The Professional Medical Journal , 2010,
Abstract: To determine the frequency of different causes of iron deficiency anemia in female patients of reproductive age group. 2) Todetermine the association between lack of balanced diet and iron deficiency anemia. Design: cross-sectional analytical study. Setting: Federalgovernment services hospital, Islamabad. Period: From July 2008 to November 2008. Material and Methods: The study included femalepatients of reproductive age group i.e. 15-49 years of age having hemoglobin less than 11.5g/dl. The sampling technique was purposive. Thedata was analyzed using Microsoft excel 2000 and SPSS 10.0. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to determine the direction ofrelationship between total nutritional score and level of hemoglobin; student’s t-test was used to determine the significance of association. A pvalueof less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results: A positive correlation was observed between total nutritional score and level ofhemoglobin (r = 0.402, p-value = 0.008). Correlation between animal protein and level of hemoglobin was 0.438 (p-value = 0.004) while betweenplant protein and level of hemoglobin was 0.211 (p-value = 0.179). Conclusions: It is concluded that there is a definite role of nutritionaldeprivation in the development of iron deficiency anemia. Lack of balanced diet especially protein group has much stronger association with thistype of anemia. Animal protein as compared to plant protein has strong association with the development of iron deficiency anemia.
Iron deficiency anemia is not a rare problem among women of reproductive ages in Ethiopia: a community based cross sectional study
Jemal A Haidar, Rebecca S Pobocik
BMC Blood Disorders , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2326-9-7
Abstract: The first large nutrition study of a representative sample of women in Ethiopia was conducted from June to July 2005 and a systematically selected sub-sample of 970 of these subjects, 15 to 49 years old, were used in this analysis of nutritional anemia. Hemoglobin was measured from capillary blood using a portable HemoCue photometer. For serum ferritin, venous blood from antecubital veins was measured by an automated Elecsys 1020 using commercial kits. Diets were assessed via simplified food frequency questionnaire. The association of anemia to demographic and health variables was tested by chi-square and a stepwise backward logistic regression model was applied to test the significant associations observed in chi square tests.Mean hemoglobin ± SD was 11.5 ± 2.1 g/dL with a 29.4% prevalence of anemia. Mean serum ferritin was 58 ± 41.1 ug/L with a 32.1% prevalence of iron deficiency. The overall prevalence rate of iron deficiency anemia was 18.0%. Prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency, and iron deficiency anemia was highest among those 31-49 years old (p < 0.05). Intake of vegetables less than once a day and meat less than once a week was common and was associated with increased anemia (p = 0.001). Although the prevalence of anemia was slightly higher among women with parasitic infestation the difference was not significant (p = 0.9). Nonetheless, anemia was significantly higher in women with history of illness and the association was retained even when the variable was adjusted for its confounding effect in the logistic regression models (AOR = 0.3; 95%CI = 0.17 to 0.5) signifying that the most probable causes of anemia is nutrition related and to some extent chronic illnesses.Moderate nutritional anemia in the form of iron deficiency anemia is a problem in Ethiopia and therefore, the need for improved supplementation to vulnerable groups is warranted to achieve the United Nation's Millennium Development Goals. Chronic illnesses are another important cause of anemia
Iron deficiency anemia  [cached]
?nci Y?ld?z
Turk Pediatri Ar?ivi , 2009,
Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is the most frequent and widespread anemia around the world. Its prevalence is increased in infants and adolescent girls. The etiologic factors may vary but anemia is essentially related to iron-deficient nutrition, blood loss and malabsorption. Children may have paleness, cardiovascular and neurologic impacts of anemia, pica, epithelial changes as koilonychia, glossitis, angular stomatitis. Treatment is by oral or parenteral supplementation of iron. (Turk Arch Ped 2009; 44 Suppl: 14-8)
Iron Deficiency Anemia: Focus on Infectious Diseases in Lesser Developed Countries  [PDF]
Julia G. Shaw,Jennifer F. Friedman
Anemia , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/260380
Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia is thought to affect the health of more than one billion people worldwide, with the greatest burden of disease experienced in lesser developed countries, particularly women of reproductive age and children. This greater disease burden is due to both nutritional and infectious etiologies. Individuals in lesser developed countries have diets that are much lower in iron, less access to multivitamins for young children and pregnant women, and increased rates of fertility which increase demands for iron through the life course. Infectious diseases, particularly parasitic diseases, also lead to both extracorporeal iron loss and anemia of inflammation, which decreases bioavailability of iron to host tissues. This paper will address the unique etiologies and consequences of both iron deficiency anemia and the alterations in iron absorption and distribution seen in the context of anemia of inflammation. Implications for diagnosis and treatment in this unique context will also be discussed.
Iron Deficiency Anemia
Hassan Ahari,Nayer Farzbod
Acta Medica Iranica , 1965,
Abstract: The object of this paper is to draw attention to iron deficiency anemia which is the most common nutritional disturbance in infants and children. Iron deficiency anemia constitutes the most prevalent form of anemia in this age group. The records of infants and children admitted to the Pediatric Department of Tehran University Puhlavi Hospital for various ailments during a one year period (Mnrch l!l63 - HHi-t ) were analyzed. 262 infants and children out of a total number of an5, or 7t /., showed iron deficiency anemia detect cd by blood film studies and hemoglobin determination, The majority, 123 or 4{).!t /., of these patients were infants and children between six months and two years of age. The etiology indicates that faulty feeding is the main cause. Infections, parnsitcs, and hemorrhage were among other causes observed. ,'('itll regard to treatment, parenteral iron was preferred because cf its ef., Icctivcncss in short periods of hospital stay. In conclusion, the routine study of blood films and hemoglobin determiualion, especially in the low socio _ economic group of medically less organized countries is advised
IRON DEFICIENCY ANEMIA
SHAHEEN AHMED
The Professional Medical Journal , 2009,
Abstract: Introduction: The adherence to treatment of iron deficiency anemia often is poor in both developed and developing countries. The current standard therapy is oral ferrous sulfate administered 3 times daily. It is possible that adherence would improve with a single-dose daily treatment regimen. Objectives: To compare single versus thrice daily ferrous sulfate for treatment of iron deficiency anemia in young children. Design: Quasi experimental study Setting: Children Department Military Hospital Rawalpindi. Period: From (01 Jan- to31 Mar 05 and 03 Jul to 02 Oct 05) Subjects and Methods: Total 250 patients of iron deficiency anemia (hemoglobin values: 7.0 to 9.9 gm/dl and serum ferritin values: 10 ng/ml or less) were identified. Children divided into two groups and matched on the basis of age; and gender. One group (n = 125) received ferrous sulfate once daily and the control group (n = 125) received ferrous sulfate thrice daily at a total dose of 6 mg/kg/day of elemental iron for 2 months. Hemoglobin and serum ferritin values were measured as baseline and at the end of the study. Results: Successful treatment of anemia (target hemoglobin > 10 gm/dl) occurred in 81.42 % of the single dose and in 79.83 % of thrice daily dose groups and the side effects were minimal between the two groups. Conclusion: A single versus a 3 times daily dose of ferrous sulfate resulted in a similar rate of successful treatment of iron deficiency anemia, without significant side effects.
Iron deficiency anemia and its importance in gastroenterology clinical practice  [PDF]
Vu?eli? D.,Nenadi? B.,Pe?ko P.,Bjelovi? M.
Acta Chirurgica Iugoslavica , 2007, DOI: 10.2298/aci0701091v
Abstract: Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is a universal problem involving individuals of all ages and both sexes and is a common cause of referral to medical departments. This anemia is one of the most common types of anemia. IDA impairs growth and intellectual development in children and adolescent. In women IDA is most common in reproductive period because of menstrual and pregnancy iron losses. IDA affects roughly 10-30% of all pregnancies and, among others morbidities, may contribute of developing postpartum depression. Among other adult patient, chronic occult gastrointestinal bleeding is the leading cause of IDA. Approximately, one third of patients with anemia have iron deficiency and up to two thirds of patients with IDA have serious gastrointestinal lesions detected with esophagogastroduodenoscopy and colonoscopy, including 10-15% with malignancy. However, in practice not all anemic patients undergo appropriate diagnostic tests to detect iron deficiency. Furthermore, a substantial proportion of patients with IDA do not undergo endoscopic evaluation. The approach to its investigation and subsequent therapy depends upon a comprehensive understanding of iron metabolism and heme synthesis. Once diagnosis of iron deficiency or IDA is established, evaluation for the cause of anemia must be appropriate performed and treatment must include corrective replenishment of body stores.
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