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Calculating God from the God Particle  [PDF]
Walter James Christensen Jr.
Journal of Modern Physics (JMP) , 2016, DOI: 10.4236/jmp.2016.72024
Abstract: Can the existence of “God” be calculated from known science and mathematics? We argue yes, provided the question is restricted to whether or not memory and consciousness are properties of spacetime. In this sense, we are seeking the god of Spinoza and Einstein, where the Universe is thought to be identical with divinity—but with the added characteristic of “awareness”. Currently, memory and consciousness and their relationship to spacetime and matter are of great interest to many prominent physicist, neurosurgeons, anesthesiologists, and philosophers. To show “Space-time Thinks,” we begin with a thought experiment formulated in 1867 by James Clerk Maxwell— together with Leó Szilárd’s discovery that memory and information are intimately related to the Second Law of Thermodynamics. Finally, we verify that memory and consciousness are properties of spacetime through an analogous Maxwell-Szilárd thought experiment associated with the creation of the God Particle—Higgs boson.
Quantum features of consciousness, computers and brain  [PDF]
Michael B. Mensky
Physics , 2009,
Abstract: Many people believe that mysterious phenomenon of consciousness may be connected with quantum features of our world. The present author proposed so-called Extended Everett's Concept (EEC) that allowed to explain consciousness and super-consciousness (intuitive knowledge). Brain, according to EEC, is an interface between consciousness and super-consciousness on the one part and body on the other part. Relations between all these components of the human cognitive system are analyzed in the framework of EEC. It is concluded that technical devices improving usage of super-consciousness (intuition) may exist.
Spectral Signatures of Reorganised Brain Networks in Disorders of Consciousness  [PDF]
Srivas Chennu ,Paola Finoia,Evelyn Kamau,Judith Allanson,Guy B. Williams,Martin M. Monti,Valdas Noreika,Aurina Arnatkeviciute,Andrés Canales-Johnson,Francisco Olivares,Daniela Cabezas-Soto,David K. Menon,John D. Pickard,Adrian M. Owen,Tristan A. Bekinschtein
PLOS Computational Biology , 2014, DOI: doi/10.1371/journal.pcbi.1003887
Abstract: Theoretical advances in the science of consciousness have proposed that it is concomitant with balanced cortical integration and differentiation, enabled by efficient networks of information transfer across multiple scales. Here, we apply graph theory to compare key signatures of such networks in high-density electroencephalographic data from 32 patients with chronic disorders of consciousness, against normative data from healthy controls. Based on connectivity within canonical frequency bands, we found that patient networks had reduced local and global efficiency, and fewer hubs in the alpha band. We devised a novel topographical metric, termed modular span, which showed that the alpha network modules in patients were also spatially circumscribed, lacking the structured long-distance interactions commonly observed in the healthy controls. Importantly however, these differences between graph-theoretic metrics were partially reversed in delta and theta band networks, which were also significantly more similar to each other in patients than controls. Going further, we found that metrics of alpha network efficiency also correlated with the degree of behavioural awareness. Intriguingly, some patients in behaviourally unresponsive vegetative states who demonstrated evidence of covert awareness with functional neuroimaging stood out from this trend: they had alpha networks that were remarkably well preserved and similar to those observed in the controls. Taken together, our findings inform current understanding of disorders of consciousness by highlighting the distinctive brain networks that characterise them. In the significant minority of vegetative patients who follow commands in neuroimaging tests, they point to putative network mechanisms that could support cognitive function and consciousness despite profound behavioural impairment.
Is Brain in a Superfluid State? Physics of Consciousness  [PDF]
Benoy Chakraverty
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: The article "Physics of Consciousness" treats mind as an abstract Hilbert space with a set of orthogonal base vectors to describe information like particles, which are considered to be the elementary excitation of a quantum field. A non-Hermitian operator of Self is introduced to create these information like particles which in turn will constitute a coherent information field. The non - zero average of this self operator is shown to constitute our basic I. Awareness and consciousness is described very simply as a response function of these operators to external world. We show with a very simple neural model how a baby less than two years old develop self-awareness as the neural connectivity achieves a critical value. The all-important I is the basic cognitive order parameter of each human brain and is a result of thermodynamic phase transition from a chaotic disordered state to a symmetry broken coherent ordered state, very akin to physics of superfluidity.
Consciousness Viewed in the Framework of Brain Phase Space Dynamics, Criticality, and the Renormalization Group  [PDF]
Gerhard Werner
Quantitative Biology , 2011,
Abstract: To set the stage for viewing Consciousness in terms of brain phase space dynamics and criticality, I will first review currently prominent theoretical conceptualizations and, where appropriate, identify ill-advised and flawed notions in Theoretical Neuroscience that may impede viewing Consciousness as a phenomenon in Physics. I will furthermore introduce relevant facts that tend not to receive adequate attention in much of the current Consciousness discourse. As a new approach to conceptualizing Consciousness, I propose considering it as a collective achievement of the brain' s complex neural dynamics that is amenable to study in the framework of state space dynamics and criticality. In Physics, concepts of phase space transitions and the Renormalization Group are powerful tools for interpreting phenomena involving many scales of length and time in complex systems. The significance of these concepts lies in their accounting for the emergence of different levels of new collective behaviors in complex systems, each level with its distinct ontology, organization and laws, as a new pattern of reality. The presumption of this proposal is that the subjectivity of Consciousness is the epistemic interpretation of a level of reality that originates in phase transitions of the brain-body-environment system.
Physical Foundations of Consciousness: Brain Organisation: The Role of Synapses  [PDF]
Charles Ross,Shirley Redpath
Quantitative Biology , 2009,
Abstract: We have analysed the many facets of Consciousness into two distinct categories. First: the organisational state of the neural networks at any one time, which determines whether a person is conscious - awake, or unconscious - asleep. Second: the processes that underlie the traffic of electrical signals across these networks that accounts for all the experiences of conscious awareness. This paper addresses the former; namely, how the state of the billions of neural networks and the trillions of additional axons, dendrites and synapses varies over the daily cycle - what physically changes when we go to sleep - what happens when we wake up. We submit that the widths of synaptic clefts are not fixed, but are variable, and that this variable tension across the synapses is the neural correlate of consciousness.
Untangling Brain-Wide Dynamics in Consciousness by Cross-Embedding  [PDF]
Satohiro Tajima?,Toru Yanagawa?,Naotaka Fujii?,Taro Toyoizumi
PLOS Computational Biology , 2015, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1004537
Abstract: Brain-wide interactions generating complex neural dynamics are considered crucial for emergent cognitive functions. However, the irreducible nature of nonlinear and high-dimensional dynamical interactions challenges conventional reductionist approaches. We introduce a model-free method, based on embedding theorems in nonlinear state-space reconstruction, that permits a simultaneous characterization of complexity in local dynamics, directed interactions between brain areas, and how the complexity is produced by the interactions. We demonstrate this method in large-scale electrophysiological recordings from awake and anesthetized monkeys. The cross-embedding method captures structured interaction underlying cortex-wide dynamics that may be missed by conventional correlation-based analysis, demonstrating a critical role of time-series analysis in characterizing brain state. The method reveals a consciousness-related hierarchy of cortical areas, where dynamical complexity increases along with cross-area information flow. These findings demonstrate the advantages of the cross-embedding method in deciphering large-scale and heterogeneous neuronal systems, suggesting a crucial contribution by sensory-frontoparietal interactions to the emergence of complex brain dynamics during consciousness.
Brain Dynamics Underlying the Nonlinear Threshold for Access to Consciousness  [PDF]
Antoine Del Cul,Sylvain Baillet,Stanislas Dehaene
PLOS Biology , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0050260
Abstract: When a flashed stimulus is followed by a backward mask, subjects fail to perceive it unless the target-mask interval exceeds a threshold duration of about 50 ms. Models of conscious access postulate that this threshold is associated with the time needed to establish sustained activity in recurrent cortical loops, but the brain areas involved and their timing remain debated. We used high-density recordings of event-related potentials (ERPs) and cortical source reconstruction to assess the time course of human brain activity evoked by masked stimuli and to determine neural events during which brain activity correlates with conscious reports. Target-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was varied in small steps, allowing us to ask which ERP events show the characteristic nonlinear dependence with SOA seen in subjective and objective reports. The results separate distinct stages in mask-target interactions, indicating that a considerable amount of subliminal processing can occur early on in the occipito-temporal pathway (<250 ms) and pointing to a late (>270 ms) and highly distributed fronto-parieto-temporal activation as a correlate of conscious reportability.
Brain Dynamics Underlying the Nonlinear Threshold for Access to Consciousness  [PDF]
Antoine Del Cul ,Sylvain Baillet,Stanislas Dehaene
PLOS Biology , 2007, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.0050260
Abstract: When a flashed stimulus is followed by a backward mask, subjects fail to perceive it unless the target-mask interval exceeds a threshold duration of about 50 ms. Models of conscious access postulate that this threshold is associated with the time needed to establish sustained activity in recurrent cortical loops, but the brain areas involved and their timing remain debated. We used high-density recordings of event-related potentials (ERPs) and cortical source reconstruction to assess the time course of human brain activity evoked by masked stimuli and to determine neural events during which brain activity correlates with conscious reports. Target-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was varied in small steps, allowing us to ask which ERP events show the characteristic nonlinear dependence with SOA seen in subjective and objective reports. The results separate distinct stages in mask-target interactions, indicating that a considerable amount of subliminal processing can occur early on in the occipito-temporal pathway (<250 ms) and pointing to a late (>270 ms) and highly distributed fronto-parieto-temporal activation as a correlate of conscious reportability.
Chance, Choice, and Consciousness: The Role of Mind in the Quantum Brain  [PDF]
Henry P. Stapp
Physics , 1995,
Abstract: Contemporary quantum mechanical description of nature involves two processes. The first is a dynamical process governed by the equations of local quantum field theory. This process is local and deterministic, but it generates a structure that is not compatible with observed reality. A second process is therefore invoked. This second process somehow analyzes the structure generated by the first process into a collection of possible observable realities, and selects one of these as the actually appearing reality. This selection process is not well understood. It is necessarily nonlocal and, according to orthodox thinking, is governed by an irreducible element of chance. The occurrence of this irreducible element of chance means that the theory is not naturalistic: the dynamics is controlled in part by something that is not part of the physical universe. The present work describes a quantum mechanical model of brain dynamics in which the quantum selection process is a causal process governed not by pure chance but rather by a mathematically specified nonlocal physical process identifiable as the conscious process.
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