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The Effectiveness of the Functional Magnetic Stimulation Therapy in Treating Sciatica Syndrome  [PDF]
Tamara Radakovi?, Nikola Radakovi?
Open Journal of Therapy and Rehabilitation (OJTR) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojtr.2015.33009
Abstract: Introduction: Degenerative or traumatic causes are most common in generating sciatica syndrome, which is normally treated with well-known physical therapy methods. A relatively new way of treating sciatica problems is so-called functional magnetic stimulation (FMS), whose principle is based on electromagnetic field inducing electrical field inside the body. Electrical field triggers action potential of nerve cells and that way stimulates peripheral motor nerve system. Aim: Aim of this study is to measure and estimate the effectiveness of implementing therapy with functional magnetic stimulation in regular physical treatment of sciatica syndrome. Materials and Methods: 28 male patients aged between 30 and 55 with back problem were recruited on an outpatient basis. FMS therapy was performed with TESLA Stym? device (Iskra Medical d.o.o., Slovenia) treating lumbosacral region equally on both sides of the spine. Physical examination was performed to evaluate tree parameters: the mobility of the lumbar spine in flexion and extension, together with the straight leg raise test (Lasegue sign). We estimated patients’ progress, comparing angle values of mobility from the first examination day with other examination days. Results: In FMS treated group of patients, lumbosacral flexion, extension and Lasegue test angle were significantly higher compared to day 0 on the first physical examination day (day 3) (p < 0.05). In control group such increase of a measured angle was not noticed until a second physical examination day (day 5) or a third physical examination day (day 8) (p < 0.05). Discussion: Results in this study showed that applying FMS therapy along with other standard physical therapy methods rapidly increased effectiveness of the treatment of sciatica syndrome (lat. ischialgia). It suggests that functional magnetic therapy could be suggested as a regular physical therapy method in treating this kind of pain syndromes.
Influence of Low Back Pain and Prognostic Value of MRI in Sciatica Patients in Relation to Back Pain  [PDF]
Abdelilah el Barzouhi, Carmen L. A. M. Vleggeert-Lankamp, Geert J. Lycklama à Nijeholt, Bas F. Van der Kallen, Wilbert B. van den Hout, Bart W. Koes, Wilco C. Peul, for the Leiden–The Hague Spine Intervention Prognostic Study Group
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0090800
Abstract: Background Patients with sciatica frequently complain about associated back pain. It is not known whether there are prognostic relevant differences in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) findings between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. Methods The study population contained patients with sciatica who underwent a baseline MRI to assess eligibility for a randomized trial designed to compare the efficacy of early surgery with prolonged conservative care for sciatica. Two neuroradiologists and one neurosurgeon independently evaluated all MR images. The MRI readers were blinded to symptom status. The MRI findings were compared between sciatica patients with and without disabling back pain. The presence of disabling back pain at baseline was correlated with perceived recovery at one year. Results Of 379 included sciatica patients, 158 (42%) had disabling back pain. Of the patients with both sciatica and disabling back pain 68% did reveal a herniated disc with nerve root compression on MRI, compared to 88% of patients with predominantly sciatica (P<0.001). The existence of disabling back pain in sciatica at baseline was negatively associated with perceived recovery at one year (Odds ratio [OR] 0.32, 95% Confidence Interval 0.18–0.56, P<0.001). Sciatica patients with disabling back pain in absence of nerve root compression on MRI at baseline reported less perceived recovery at one year compared to those with predominantly sciatica and nerve root compression on MRI (50% vs 91%, P<0.001). Conclusion Sciatica patients with disabling low back pain reported an unfavorable outcome at one-year follow-up compared to those with predominantly sciatica. If additionally a clear herniated disc with nerve root compression on MRI was absent, the results were even worse.
AMELIORATIVE EFFECTS OF TINOSPORA CORDIFOLIA IN SCIATICA PAIN INDUCED RATS  [PDF]
Thaakur Santhrani,Yaidikar Lavanya
International Research Journal of Pharmacy , 2012,
Abstract: The present study was aimed at investigating the ameliorative effect of Tinospora cordifolia in sciatic nerve root Ligation -induced sciatica pain in rats. Adult male albino rats weighing 130-150gm were used for the study, and were divided into seven groups and ligation was performed on left sciatic nerve in group II to group VII. Tail cold-hyperalgesia, motor co-ordination tests, foot deformity, and total calcium levels were estimated to assess the extent of sciatica. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and lipid peroxide (LPO) levels were estimated to evaluate the extent of oxidative stress. The alcoholic and aqueous extract of Tinospora cordifolia was administered at a dose of 100 and 200 mg/kg/p.o for 15 days. Tinospora cordifolia attenuated sciatic nerve root Ligation-induced motor in-coordination, foot deformity, tail cold hyperalgesia, reversed ligation-induced alterations in lipid peroxides, total calcium, superoxide dismutase, catalase levels in a dose-dependent manner. Ameliorative effects of Tinospora cordifolia in ligation-induced sciatica may be due to its foot deformity, antioxidant, and calcium attenuating actions.
Does the diagnosis influence the outcome in multimodal outpatient pain management program for low back pain and sciatica? a comparative study  [cached]
Artner J,Kurz S,Cakir B,Reichel H
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare , 2012,
Abstract: Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, GermanyAbstract: The literature describes multimodal pain-management programs as successful therapy options in the conservative treatment of chronic low back pain. Yet, the intensity and inclusion criteria of such programs remain debatable. In many studies, the pain originating from spinal structures is described as nonspecific low back pain – a diffuse diagnosis without serious implications. The purpose of this study is to compare the short-term outcomes between patients suffering from sciatica due to a discus intervertebralis herniation and those suffering from low back pain caused by facet joint disease after 3 weeks of treatment in an intense multimodal outpatient program in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university hospital.Keywords: chronic low back pain, sciatica, interdisciplinary management, discus herniation, spondylarthritis
Use of Temporary Implantable Biomaterials to Reduce Leg Pain and Back Pain in Patients with Sciatica and Lumbar Disc Herniation  [PDF]
Gere S. DiZerega,Melissa M. Traylor,Lisa S. Alphonso,Samuel J. Falcone
Materials , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/ma3053331
Abstract: The principle etiology of leg pain (sciatica) from lumbar disc herniation is mechanical compression of the nerve root. Sciatica is reduced by decompression of the herniated disc, i.e., removing mechanical compression of the nerve root. Decompression surgery typically reduces sciatica more than lumbar back pain (LBP). Decompression surgery reduces mechanical compression of the nerve root. However, decompression surgery does not directly reduce sensitization of the sensory nerves in the epidural space and disc. In addition, sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus and epidural space are not protected from topical interaction with pain mediators induced by decompression surgery. The secondary etiology of sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is sensitization of the nerve root. Sensitization of the nerve root results from a) mechanical compression, b) exposure to cellular pain mediators, and/or c) exposure to biochemical pain mediators. Although decompression surgery reduces nerve root compression, sensory nerve sensitization often persists. These observations are consistent with continued exposure of tissue in the epidural space, including the nerve root, to increased cellular and biochemical pain mediators following surgery. A potential contributor to lumbar back pain (LBP) is stimulation of sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus by a) cellular pain mediators and/or b) biochemical pain mediators that accompany annular tears or disruption. Sensory fibers located in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosus increase in number and depth as a result of disc herniation. The nucleus pulposus is comprised of material that can produce an autoimmune stimulation of the sensory nerves located in the annulus and epidural space leading to LBP. The sensory nerves of the annulus fibrosus and epidural space may be sensitized by topical exposure to cellular and biochemical pain mediators induced by lumbar surgery. Annulotomy or annular rupture allows the nucleus pulposus topical access to sensory nerve fibers, thereby leading to LBP. Coverage of the annulus and adjacent structures in the epidural space by absorbable viscoelastic gels appears to reduce LBP following surgery by protecting sensory fibers from cellular and biochemical pain mediators.
Low-level laser therapy, at 830 nm, for pain reduction in experimental model of rats with sciatica
Bertolini, G R F;Artifon, E L;Silva, T S;Cunha, D M;Vigo, P R;
Arquivos de Neuro-Psiquiatria , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S0004-282X2011000300017
Abstract: chronic pain, resulting from nerve compression, is a common clinical presentation. one means of conservative treatment is low-level laser therapy, although controversial. the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of two doses of low-level laser, at 830 nm, on pain reduction in animals subjected to sciatica. eighteen rats were used, divided into three groups: gs (n=6), sciatica and simulated treatment; g4j (n=6), sciatica and treatment with 4 j/cm2; and g8j (n=6), sciatica and irradiation with 8 j/cm2. the right sciatic nerve was exposed and compressed using catgut thread. five days of treatment were started on the third postoperative day. pain was assessed by means of the paw elevation time during gait: before sciatica, before and after the first and second therapies, and the end of the fifth therapy. low-level laser was effective in reducing the painful condition.
Free gas in the spinal canal as cause of low back pain and sciatica
Pietro Lisai,Carlo Doria,Leonardo Crissantu,Gabriele Spano,Tomas Dore,Carlo Fabbriciani
Journal of Orthopaedics and Traumatology , 2000, DOI: 10.1007/PL00012203
Abstract: We describe two patients suffering from sciatica for the presence of epidural gas compressing the nerve root. Previously, only one patient had undergone spinal surgery. The aim of this report is to describe the origin and the treatment of radiculopathies caused by epidural gas.
Does the diagnosis influence the outcome in multimodal outpatient pain management program for low back pain and sciatica? a comparative study
Artner J, Kurz S, Cakir B, Reichel H, Lattig F
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S31753
Abstract: es the diagnosis influence the outcome in multimodal outpatient pain management program for low back pain and sciatica? a comparative study Original Research (1226) Total Article Views Authors: Artner J, Kurz S, Cakir B, Reichel H, Lattig F Published Date July 2012 Volume 2012:5 Pages 163 - 167 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S31753 Received: 13 March 2012 Accepted: 01 April 2012 Published: 13 July 2012 Juraj Artner, Stephan Kurz, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike Lattig Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, Germany Abstract: The literature describes multimodal pain-management programs as successful therapy options in the conservative treatment of chronic low back pain. Yet, the intensity and inclusion criteria of such programs remain debatable. In many studies, the pain originating from spinal structures is described as nonspecific low back pain – a diffuse diagnosis without serious implications. The purpose of this study is to compare the short-term outcomes between patients suffering from sciatica due to a discus intervertebralis herniation and those suffering from low back pain caused by facet joint disease after 3 weeks of treatment in an intense multimodal outpatient program in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the university hospital.
Epidural injection use for low back pain associated with sciatica at an Orthopaedic centre in Kenya
JK Kingori, LN Gakuu
East African Orthopaedic Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Objective: To assess the effects of lumbar epidural steroid injections in patients with radiculopathy (sciatica), by assessing reduction of pain at short term (3 weeks) and intermediate term (12 weeks). Design: This was a prospective study done between August 2005 and July 2011 at Kikuyu Orthopaedic and Rehabilitation Centre in Kenya involving 121 patients. Methods: Patient selection was consecutive as the need for the epidural injection arose or was found necessary. After the epidural injection, patients were followed up for 12 weeks. Results: Of those followed up to the end, 58% reported significant pain reduction at 12 weeks. Four patients had a repeat injection and two patients ended up being operated on. Conclusion: Epidural steroid injection reduces pain in the majority of well selected patients with low back pain associated with radiculopathy. This seems to be short lived though. There is need for this patients to be followed up longer.
Efeitos do ultrassom terapêutico em modelo experimental de ciatalgia
Ciena, Adriano Policam;Cunha, Núbia Broetto;Moesch, Juliana;Mallmann, Juliana Schmatz;Carvalho, Alberito Rodrigo de;Moura, Paula Jaqueline de;Bertolini, Gladson Ricardo Flor;
Revista Brasileira de Medicina do Esporte , 2009, DOI: 10.1590/S1517-86922009000700004
Abstract: the sciatica possesses great general population prevalence, and its treatment tends to solve the nervous compression causes. physiotherapy aims to reduce the symptoms caused by compression. this study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound on pain in animals subjected to sciatica experimental model. eighteen rats were used and they were divided in 3 groups: group sg (n=4) submitted to the sciatica and treated with the ultrasound off, group pug (n=7) submitted to the sciatica and treated with pulsed ultrasound 2 w/cm2 (satp; 0,4 - sata) and group cug (n=7) submitted to the sciatica and treated with continuous ultrasound (0,4 w/cm2). the sciatic nerve of the posterior right limb was exposed to the compression with catgut wire in 4 points. in the 3rd postoperative day, the indirect treatment was started (right inferior limb) for four days. in the 9th postoperative day, the direct treatment begins on the surgical procedure area for 5 serial days. the paw elevation time, during the march, of the animal was verified before and after the sciatica, at the 3rd, 6th, 9th and 13th postoperative day. the results demonstrated that the application of the therapeutic ultrasound reduced the pain with both treatments in pug and cug, and it has tended larger effectiveness in the pulsed form.
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