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A Verified Approach for Checking Real-Time Specification Patterns  [PDF]
Nouha Abid,Silvano Dal Zilio,Didier Le Botlan
Computer Science , 2013,
Abstract: We propose a verified approach to the formal verification of timed properties using model-checking techniques. We focus on properties expressed using real-time specification patterns, which can be viewed as a subset of timed temporal logics that includes properties commonly found during the analysis of reactive systems. Our model-checking approach is based on the use of observers in order to transform the verification of timed patterns into the verification of simpler LTL formulas. While the use of observers for model-checking is quite common, our contribution is original in several ways. First, we define a formal framework to verify that our observers are correct and non-intrusive. Second, we define different classes of observers for each pattern and use a pragmatic approach in order to select the most efficient candidate in practice. This approach is implemented in an integrated verification tool chain for the Fiacre language.
Paths to self-organized criticality
Dickman, Ronald;Mu?oz, Miguel A.;Vespignani, Alessandro;Zapperi, Stefano;
Brazilian Journal of Physics , 2000, DOI: 10.1590/S0103-97332000000100004
Abstract: we present a pedagogical introduction to self-organized criticality (soc), unraveling its connections with nonequilibrium phase transitions. there are several paths from a conventional critical point to soc. they begin with an absorbing-state phase transition (directed percolation is a familiar example), and impose supervision or driving on the system; two commonly used methods are extremal dynamics, and driving at a rate approaching zero. we illustrate this in sandpiles, where soc is a consequence of slow driving in a system exhibiting an absorbing-state phase transition with a conserved density. other paths to soc, in driven interfaces, the bak-sneppen model, and self- organized directed percolation, are also examined. we review the status of experimental realizations of soc in light of these observations.
Paths to self-organized criticality  [cached]
Dickman Ronald,Mu?oz Miguel A.,Vespignani Alessandro,Zapperi Stefano
Brazilian Journal of Physics , 2000,
Abstract: We present a pedagogical introduction to self-organized criticality (SOC), unraveling its connections with nonequilibrium phase transitions. There are several paths from a conventional critical point to SOC. They begin with an absorbing-state phase transition (directed percolation is a familiar example), and impose supervision or driving on the system; two commonly used methods are extremal dynamics, and driving at a rate approaching zero. We illustrate this in sandpiles, where SOC is a consequence of slow driving in a system exhibiting an absorbing-state phase transition with a conserved density. Other paths to SOC, in driven interfaces, the Bak-Sneppen model, and self- organized directed percolation, are also examined. We review the status of experimental realizations of SOC in light of these observations.
Paths to Self-Organized Criticality  [PDF]
Ronald Dickman,Miguel A. Munoz,Alessandro Vespignani,Stefano Zapperi
Physics , 1999, DOI: 10.1590/S0103-97332000000100004
Abstract: We present a pedagogical introduction to self-organized criticality (SOC), unraveling its connections with nonequilibrium phase transitions. There are several paths from a conventional critical point to SOC. They begin with an absorbing-state phase transition (directed percolation is a familiar example), and impose supervision or driving on the system; two commonly used methods are extremal dynamics, and driving at a rate approaching zero. We illustrate this in sandpiles, where SOC is a consequence of slow driving in a system exhibiting an absorbing-state phase transition with a conserved density. Other paths to SOC, in driven interfaces, the Bak-Sneppen model, and self-organized directed percolation, are also examined. We review the status of experimental realizations of SOC in light of these observations.
Statistical Model Checking : An Overview  [PDF]
Axel Legay,Benoit Delahaye
Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: Quantitative properties of stochastic systems are usually specified in logics that allow one to compare the measure of executions satisfying certain temporal properties with thresholds. The model checking problem for stochastic systems with respect to such logics is typically solved by a numerical approach that iteratively computes (or approximates) the exact measure of paths satisfying relevant subformulas; the algorithms themselves depend on the class of systems being analyzed as well as the logic used for specifying the properties. Another approach to solve the model checking problem is to \emph{simulate} the system for finitely many runs, and use \emph{hypothesis testing} to infer whether the samples provide a \emph{statistical} evidence for the satisfaction or violation of the specification. In this short paper, we survey the statistical approach, and outline its main advantages in terms of efficiency, uniformity, and simplicity.
Proceedings First Workshop on Logics and Model-checking for Self-* Systems  [PDF]
Marcello Maria Bersani,Davide Bresolin,Luca Ferrucci,Manuel Mazzara
Computer Science , 2014, DOI: 10.4204/EPTCS.168
Abstract: This volume contains the proceedings of the First Workshop on Logics and Model-checking for self-* systems (MOD* 2014). The worshop took place in Bertinoro, Italy, on 12th of September 2014, and was a satellite event of iFM 2014 (the 11th International Conference on Integrated Formal Methods). The workshop focuses on demonstrating the applicability of Formal Methods on modern complex systems with a high degree of self-adaptivity and reconfigurability, by bringing together researchers and practitioners with the goal of pushing forward the state of the art on logics and model checking.
Self-checking Synchronous FSM Network Design with Low Overhead  [PDF]
A. Yu. Matrosova,I. Levin,S. A. Ostanin
VLSI Design , 2000, DOI: 10.1155/2000/46578
Abstract: A method of a self-checking synchronous Finite State Machine (FSM) network design with low overhead is developed. Checkers are used only for FSMs, which output lines are at the same time output lines of the network. The checkers observe output lines of these FSMs. The method is based on reducing the problem to a self-checking synchronous FSM design. The latter is provided by applying a special description of FSM namely, so-called unate Programmable Logic Array (PLAu) description. Single stuck-at fault on the FSM poles and gate poles are considered. PLAu realization of FSM allows a factorized or multilevel logic synthesis. They both provide a unidirectional manifestation of the above mentioned faults on the output lines of the corresponding FSMs. This realization also gives rise to a transparency of each component FSM of the network for the faults. PLAu realization is derived from the State Transition Graph (STG) description of FSMs with using the m-out-of-n encoding of its states and insignificant expanding the products of STG. The problem of replacing an arbitrary synchronous FSM network for the self-checking one with low overhead is discussed.
A Fine Grain Configurable Logic Block for Self-checking FPGAs  [PDF]
P. K. Lala,A. Walker
VLSI Design , 2001, DOI: 10.1155/2001/83474
Abstract: This paper proposes a logic cell that can be used as a building block for Self-checking FPGAs. The proposed logic cell consists of two 2-to-1 multiplexers, three 4-to-1 multiplexers and a D flip-flop. The cell has been designed using Differential Cascode Voltage Switch Logic. It is self-checking for all single transistor stuck-on and stuck-off faults as well as stuck-at faults at the inputs of each multiplexers and the D flip-flop. The multiplexers and the D flip-flop provide either correct (complementary) output in the absence of above-mentioned faults; otherwise the outputs are identical.
Reliable Self-Stabilizing Communication for Quasi Rendezvous  [PDF]
Colette Johnen,Ivan Lavallee,Christian Lavault
Computer Science , 2010,
Abstract: The paper presents three self-stabilizing protocols for basic fair and reliable link communication primitives. We assume a link-register communication model under read/write atomicity, where every process can read from but cannot write into its neighbours' registers. The first primitive guarantees that any process writes a new value in its register(s) only after all its neighbours have read the previous value, whatever the initial scheduling of processes' actions. The second primitive implements a "weak rendezvous" communication mechanism by using an alternating bit protocol: whenever a process consecutively writes n values (possibly the same ones) in a register, each neighbour is guaranteed to read each value from the register at least once. On the basis of the previous protocol, the third primitive implements a "quasi rendezvous": in words, this primitive ensures furthermore that there exists exactly one reading between two writing operations All protocols are self-stabilizing and run in asynchronous arbitrary networks. The goal of the paper is in handling each primitive by a separate procedure, which can be used as a "black box" in more involved self-stabilizing protocols.
Specification-based Synthesis of Distributed Self-Stabilizing Protocols  [PDF]
Fathiyeh Faghih,Borzoo Bonakdarpour,Sebastien Tixeuil,Sandeep Kulkarni
Computer Science , 2015,
Abstract: In this paper, we introduce an SMT based method that automatically synthesizes a distributed self stabilizing protocol from a given high level specification and the network topology. Unlike existing approaches, where synthesis algorithms require the explicit description of the set of legitimate states, our technique only needs the temporal behavior of the protocol. We also extend our approach to synthesize ideal stabilizing protocols, where every state is legitimate. Our proposed methods are fully implemented and we report successful synthesis of Dijkstra`s token ring and a self stabilizing version of Raymond`s mutual exclusion algorithm, as well as ideal stabilizing leader election and local mutual exclusion.
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