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Letter of Intent: The Hyper-Kamiokande Experiment --- Detector Design and Physics Potential ---  [PDF]
K. Abe,T. Abe,H. Aihara,Y. Fukuda,Y. Hayato,K. Huang,A. K. Ichikawa,M. Ikeda,K. Inoue,H. Ishino,Y. Itow,T. Kajita,J. Kameda,Y. Kishimoto,M. Koga,Y. Koshio,K. P. Lee,A. Minamino,M. Miura,S. Moriyama,M. Nakahata,K. Nakamura,T. Nakaya,S. Nakayama,K. Nishijima,Y. Nishimura,Y. Obayashi,K. Okumura,M. Sakuda,H. Sekiya,M. Shiozawa,A. T. Suzuki,Y. Suzuki,A. Takeda,Y. Takeuchi,H. K. M. Tanaka,S. Tasaka,T. Tomura,M. R. Vagins,J. Wang,M. Yokoyama
Physics , 2011,
Abstract: We propose the Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) detector as a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector. It will serve as a far detector of a long baseline neutrino oscillation experiment envisioned for the upgraded J-PARC, and as a detector capable of observing -- far beyond the sensitivity of the Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) detector -- proton decays, atmospheric neutrinos, and neutrinos from astronomical origins. The baseline design of Hyper-K is based on the highly successful Super-K, taking full advantage of a well-proven technology. (to be continued)
A Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande  [PDF]
Hyper-Kamiokande Working Group,:,K. Abe,H. Aihara,C. Andreopoulos,I. Anghel,A. Ariga,T. Ariga,R. Asfandiyarov,M. Askins,J. J. Back,P. Ballett,M. Barbi,G. J. Barker,G. Barr,F. Bay,P. Beltrame,V. Berardi,M. Bergevin,S. Berkman,T. Berry,S. Bhadra,F. d. M. Blaszczyk,A. Blondel,S. Bolognesi,S. B. Boyd,A. Bravar,C. Bronner,F. S. Cafagna,G. Carminati,S. L. Cartwright,M. G. Catanesi,K. Choi,J. H. Choi,G. Collazuol,G. Cowan,L. Cremonesi,G. Davies,G. De Rosa,C. Densham,J. Detwiler,D. Dewhurst,F. Di Lodovico,S. Di Luise,O. Drapier,S. Emery,A. Ereditato,P. Fernandez,T. Feusels,A. Finch,M. Fitton,M. Friend,Y. Fujii,Y. Fukuda,D. Fukuda,V. Galymov,K. Ganezer,M. Gonin,P. Gumplinger,D. R. Hadley,L. Haegel,A. Haesler,Y. Haga,B. Hartfiel,M. Hartz,Y. Hayato,M. Hierholzer,J. Hill,A. Himmel,S. Hirota,S. Horiuchi,K. Huang,A. K. Ichikawa,T. Iijima,M. Ikeda,J. Imber,K. Inoue,J. Insler,R. A. Intonti,T. Irvine,T. Ishida,H. Ishino,M. Ishitsuka,Y. Itow,A. Izmaylov,B. Jamieson,H. I. Jang,M. Jiang,K. K. Joo,C. K. Jung,A. Kaboth,T. Kajita,J. Kameda,Y. Karadhzov,T. Katori,E. Kearns,M. Khabibullin,A. Khotjantsev,J. Y. Kim,S. B. Kim,Y. Kishimoto,T. Kobayashi,M. Koga,A. Konaka,L. L. Kormos,A. Korzenev,Y. Koshio,W. R. Kropp,Y. Kudenko,T. Kutter,M. Kuze,L. Labarga,J. Lagoda,M. Laveder,M. Lawe,J. G. Learned,I. T. Lim,T. Lindner,A. Longhin,L. Ludovici,W. Ma,L. Magaletti,K. Mahn,M. Malek,C. Mariani,L. Marti,J. F. Martin,C. Martin,P. P. J. Martins,E. Mazzucato,N. McCauley,K. S. McFarland,C. McGrew,M. Mezzetto
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this document, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis has been updated from the previous Letter of Intent [K. Abe et al., arXiv:1109.3262 [hep-ex]], based on the experience gained from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam produced by the J-PARC proton synchrotron, it is expected that the $CP$ phase $\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than $3\,\sigma$ ($5\,\sigma$) for $76%$ ($58%$) of the $\delta_{CP}$ parameter space.
Physics Potential of a Long Baseline Neutrino Oscillation Experiment Using J-PARC Neutrino Beam and Hyper-Kamiokande  [PDF]
Hyper-Kamiokande Proto-Collaboraion,:,K. Abe,H. Aihara,C. Andreopoulos,I. Anghel,A. Ariga,T. Ariga,R. Asfandiyarov,M. Askins,J. J. Back,P. Ballett,M. Barbi,G. J. Barker,G. Barr,F. Bay,P. Beltrame,V. Berardi,M. Bergevin,S. Berkman,T. Berry,S. Bhadra,F. d. M. Blaszczyk,A. Blondel,S. Bolognesi,S. B. Boyd,A. Bravar,C. Bronner,F. S. Cafagna,G. Carminati,S. L. Cartwright,M. G. Catanesi,K. Choi,J. H. Choi,G. Collazuol,G. Cowan,L. Cremonesi,G. Davies,G. De Rosa,C. Densham,J. Detwiler,D. Dewhurst,F. Di Lodovico,S. Di Luise,O. Drapier,S. Emery,A. Ereditato,P. Fernández,T. Feusels,A. Finch,M. Fitton,M. Friend,Y. Fujii,Y. Fukuda,D. Fukuda,V. Galymov,K. Ganezer,M. Gonin,P. Gumplinger,D. R. Hadley,L. Haegel,A. Haesler,Y. Haga,B. Hartfiel,M. Hartz,Y. Hayato,M. Hierholzer,J. Hill,A. Himmel,S. Hirota,S. Horiuchi,K. Huang,A. K. Ichikawa,T. Iijima,M. Ikeda,J. Imber,K. Inoue,J. Insler,R. A. Intonti,T. Irvine,T. Ishida,H. Ishino,M. Ishitsuka,Y. Itow,A. Izmaylov,B. Jamieson,H. I. Jang,M. Jiang,K. K. Joo,C. K. Jung,A. Kaboth,T. Kajita,J. Kameda,Y. Karadhzov,T. Katori,E. Kearns,M. Khabibullin,A. Khotjantsev,J. Y. Kim,S. B. Kim,Y. Kishimoto,T. Kobayashi,M. Koga,A. Konaka,L. L. Kormos,A. Korzenev,Y. Koshio,W. R. Kropp,Y. Kudenko,T. Kutter,M. Kuze,L. Labarga,J. Lagoda,M. Laveder,M. Lawe,J. G. Learned,I. T. Lim,T. Lindner,A. Longhin,L. Ludovici,W. Ma,L. Magaletti,K. Mahn,M. Malek,C. Mariani,L. Marti,J. F. Martin,C. Martin,P. P. J. Martins,E. Mazzucato,N. McCauley,K. S. McFarland,C. McGrew,M. Mezzetto
Physics , 2015, DOI: 10.1093/ptep/ptv061
Abstract: Hyper-Kamiokande will be a next generation underground water Cherenkov detector with a total (fiducial) mass of 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, approximately 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-Kamiokande. One of the main goals of Hyper-Kamiokande is the study of $CP$ asymmetry in the lepton sector using accelerator neutrino and anti-neutrino beams. In this paper, the physics potential of a long baseline neutrino experiment using the Hyper-Kamiokande detector and a neutrino beam from the J-PARC proton synchrotron is presented. The analysis uses the framework and systematic uncertainties derived from the ongoing T2K experiment. With a total exposure of 7.5 MW $\times$ 10$^7$ sec integrated proton beam power (corresponding to $1.56\times10^{22}$ protons on target with a 30 GeV proton beam) to a $2.5$-degree off-axis neutrino beam, it is expected that the leptonic $CP$ phase $\delta_{CP}$ can be determined to better than 19 degrees for all possible values of $\delta_{CP}$, and $CP$ violation can be established with a statistical significance of more than $3\,\sigma$ ($5\,\sigma$) for $76\%$ ($58\%$) of the $\delta_{CP}$ parameter space. Using both $\nu_e$ appearance and $\nu_\mu$ disappearance data, the expected 1$\sigma$ uncertainty of $\sin^2\theta_{23}$ is 0.015(0.006) for $\sin^2\theta_{23}=0.5(0.45)$.
Hyper-Kamiokande Physics Opportunities  [PDF]
the Hyper-Kamiokande Working Group
Physics , 2013,
Abstract: We propose the Hyper-Kamiokande (Hyper-K) detector as a next generation un- derground water Cherenkov detector. It will serve as a far detector of a long base- line neutrino oscillation experiment envisioned for the upgraded J-PARC beam, and as a detector capable of observing, far beyond the sensitivity of the Super-Kamiokande (Super-K) detector, proton decays, atmospheric neutrinos, and neutrinos from astro- physical origins. The current baseline design of Hyper-K is based on the highly suc- cessful Super-K detector, taking full advantage of a well-proven technology. Hyper-K consists of two cylindrical tanks lying side-by-side, the outer dimensions of each tank being 48(W) x54(H) x 250(L) m3. The total (fiducial) mass of the detector is 0.99 (0.56) million metric tons, which is about 20 (25) times larger than that of Super-K. This set of three one- page whitepapers prepared for the US Snowmass process describes the opportunities for future physics discoveries at the Hyper-K facility with beam, atmospheric and astrophysical neutrinos.
The Super-Kamiokande Experiment  [PDF]
C. W. Walter
Physics , 2008,
Abstract: Super-Kamiokande is a 50 kiloton water Cherenkov detector located at the Kamioka Observatory of the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo. It was designed to study neutrino oscillations and carry out searches for the decay of the nucleon. The Super-Kamiokande experiment began in 1996 and in the ensuing decade of running has produced extremely important results in the fields of atmospheric and solar neutrino oscillations, along with setting stringent limits on the decay of the nucleon and the existence of dark matter and astrophysical sources of neutrinos. Perhaps most crucially, Super-Kamiokande for the first time definitively showed that neutrinos have mass and undergo flavor oscillations. This chapter will summarize the published scientific output of the experiment with a particular emphasis on the atmospheric neutrino results.
Recent Results from the Super-Kamiokande Experiment  [PDF]
Yuichi Oyama
Physics , 2001,
Abstract: New physics results from the Super-Kamiokande experiment in 2000 are presented.
TITUS: An Intermediate Distance Detector for the Hyper-Kamiokande Neutrino Beam  [PDF]
Pierre Lasorak,Nick Prouse
Physics , 2015,
Abstract: The Tokai Intermediate Tank with Unoscillated Spectrum (TITUS) detector is a proposed addition to the Hyper-Kamiokande (HK) experiment located approximately 2 km from the J-PARC neutrino beam. The design consists of a 2 kton Gadolinium (Gd) doped water Cherenkov detector, surrounded by a magnetized iron detector designed to range-out muons. The target material and location are chosen so that the neutrino interactions and beam spectrum at TITUS will match those of HK. Including a 0.1% Gd concentration allows for neutrino/antineutrino discrimination via neutron tagging. The primary goal of TITUS is to directly measure the neutrino flux and make cross-section measurements that reduce the systematic uncertainty of the long-baseline oscillation physics program at HK and enhance its sensitivity to CP violation. TITUS can also be used for physics unrelated to the J-PARC beam, functioning as an independent detector for supernova neutrino bursts and measuring the neutron rate to improve HK proton decay searches.
PMT Triggering and Readout for the MicroBooNE Experiment  [PDF]
David Kaleko
Physics , 2013, DOI: 10.1088/1748-0221/8/09/C09009
Abstract: This paper presents the proposed PMT readout and triggering system that will be used in the MicroBooNE LArTPC experiment. The triggering scheme has been designed to study beam neutrino events as well as fully characterize cosmic rays. In addition, exploration of important physics applications including "late" scintillation light in argon and Michel electrons from muon decay will be possible. Various types of triggers and how they will be implemented in the combined PMT+TPC readout electronics system will be discussed.
Data Acquisition, Triggering, and Filtering at the Auger Engineering Radio Array  [PDF]
J. L. Kelley,for the Pierre Auger Collaboration
Physics , 2012, DOI: 10.1016/j.nima.2012.11.153
Abstract: The Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) is currently detecting cosmic rays of energies at and above 10^17 eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory, by triggering on the radio emission produced in the associated air showers. The radio-detection technique must cope with a significant background of man-made radio-frequency interference, but can provide information on shower development with a high duty cycle. We discuss our techniques to handle the challenges of self-triggered radio detection in a low-power autonomous array, including triggering and filtering algorithms, data acquisition design, and communication systems.
The Data Acquisition System for the KOTO Experiment  [PDF]
Yasuyuki Sugiyama,Jia Xu,Monica Tecchio,Nikola Whallon,Duncan McFarland,Jiasen Ma,Manabu Togawa,Yasuhisa Tajima,Mircea Bogdan,Jon Ameel,Myron Campbell,Yau Wai Wah,Joseph Comfort,Taku Yamanaka
Physics , 2014,
Abstract: We developed and built a new system of readout and trigger electronics, based on the waveform digitization and pipeline readout, for the KOTO experiment at J-PARC, Japan. KOTO aims at observing the rare kaon decay $K_{L}\rightarrow\pi^{0}\nu\bar{\nu}$. A total of 4000 readout channels from various detector subsystems are digitized by 14-bit 125-MHz ADC modules equipped with a 10-pole Bessel filter in order to reduce the pile-up effects. The trigger decision is made every 8-ns using the digitized waveform information. To avoid dead time, the ADC and trigger modules have pipelines in their FPGA chips to store data while waiting for the trigger decision. The KOTO experiment performed the first physics run in May 2013. The data acquisition system worked stably during the run.
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