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Graduate IT orientation courses in LIS
Nader Naghshineh,Elaheh Maleki
ITALICS , 2006,
Abstract: The purpose of this research is to test the impact of the graduate IT orientation courses, both on the student body and the faculty. The project surveyed the manner of delivery of "IT Basics" on graduate courses in three different "trend-setting" universities in Iran to uncover any shifts or development in training philosophy. Course delivery was analyzed from the standpoint of content, course requirements, instructor/students expectations, as well as instruction style. The comparison aimed to test the impact of the IT orientation courses, both on the student body and the faculty. The paper will outline the differences in student cohort (social and ethnic background), the courses and the staff and students attitude to the courses.
Embedding Graduate Skills in Capstone Courses  [cached]
Liz van Acker,Janis Mary Bailey
Asian Social Science , 2011, DOI: 10.5539/ass.v7n4p69
Abstract: The purpose of this article is to explore the literature on capstone courses generally ? and capstones in undergraduate business degrees in particular ? to determine the role of these courses in embedding graduate skills, with specific emphasis on a study conducted by the authors and colleagues. The paper concludes by providing five core principles for embedding generic skills as a way of improving the design, teaching and assessment of capstone courses.
Graduate Level Mathematics Curriculum Courses: How are they taught?
Zelha Tun?-Pekkan
Mathematics Educator , 2007,
Abstract: Even though there is much research related to the teaching and learning of K-12 mathematics, there are few studies in the literature related to university professors’ teaching. In this research report, I investigated how three professors of mathematics education structure their graduate level curriculum courses. The results show that three factors influence the ways that the professors design this course: (a) their view of mathematics curriculum, (b) their view of graduate students’ contributions to classroom atmosphere, and (c) their learning goals for the graduate students.
New international classification of functioning, disability and health  [PDF]
Stucki Gerold,Maksimovi? Milo?,Davidovi? Dragana,Jorga Jagoda
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo , 2007, DOI: 10.2298/sarh0706371s
Abstract: The WHO International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) provides a coherent view of health from a biological, individual and social perspective. This view may be defined both as multi- and interdisciplinary management of one’s functioning and health. This new classification is currently being assessed in multiple centers in 32 countries, on 12 health conditions. The Institute of Hygiene and Medical Ecology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, is one of them, serving as the centre where the classification is being tested in obese population. The objective of this paper is to provide information needed for further development and practical application of this classification in various health conditions. The new language of ICF is an exciting landmark event for preventive medicine and rehabilitation. It may lead to a stronger position of rehabilitation within the medical community, change multiprofessional communication and improve communication between patients and health professionals. .
Neuropsychological and Socio-Occupational Functioning in Young Psychiatric Outpatients: A Longitudinal Investigation  [PDF]
Rico S. C. Lee, Daniel F. Hermens, M. Antoinette Redoblado-Hodge, Sharon L. Naismith, Melanie A. Porter, Manreena Kaur, Django White, Elizabeth M. Scott, Ian B. Hickie
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0058176
Abstract: Background Clinical symptoms and neuropsychological deficits are longitudinally associated with functional outcome in chronic psychiatric cohorts. The current study extended these findings to young and early-course psychiatric outpatients, with the aim of identifying cognitive markers that predict later socio-occupational functioning. Methods At baseline, 183 young psychiatric outpatients were assessed. Ninety-three returned for follow-up (M = 21.6 years old; SD = 4.5) with an average re-assessment interval of 21.6 months (SD = 7.0), and primary diagnoses of major depressive disorder (n = 34), bipolar disorder (n = 29), or psychosis (n = 30). The primary outcome measure was cross-validated with various other functional measures and structural equation modelling was used to map out the interrelationships between predictors and later functional outcome. Results Good socio-occupational functioning at follow-up was associated with better quality of life, less disability, current employment and being in a romantic relationship. The final structural equation model explained 47.5% of the variability in functional outcome at follow-up, with baseline neuropsychological functioning (a composite of memory, working memory and attentional switching) the best independent predictor of later functional outcome. Notably, depressive and negative symptoms were only associated with functioning cross-sectionally. Diagnosis at follow-up was not associated with functional outcome. Conclusions Neuropsychological functioning was the single best predictor of later socio-occupational outcome among young psychiatric outpatients. Therefore, framing psychiatric disorders along a neuropsychological continuum is likely to be more useful in predicting functional trajectory than traditional symptom-based classification systems. The current findings also have implications for early intervention utilising cognitive remediation approaches.
Which Depressive Symptoms and Medication Side Effects Are Perceived by Patients as Interfering Most with Occupational Functioning?  [PDF]
Raymond W. Lam,Erin E. Michalak,David J. Bond,Edwin M. Tam,Auby Axler,Lakshmi N. Yatham
Depression Research and Treatment , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/630206
Abstract: Background. Major depressive disorder (MDD) is associated with significant impairment in occupational functioning. This study sought to determine which depressive symptoms and medication side effects were perceived by patients with MDD to have the greatest interference on work functioning. Methods. 164 consecutive patients with MDD by DSM-IV criteria completed a standard assessment that included a self-rated questionnaire about the degree to which symptoms and side effects interfered with work functioning. Results. The symptoms perceived by patients as interfering most with work functioning were fatigue and low energy, insomnia, concentration and memory problems, anxiety, and irritability. The medication side effects rated as interfering most with work functioning were daytime sedation, insomnia, headache, and agitation/anxiety. There were no differences between men and women in symptoms or side effects that were perceived as interfering with work functioning. Limitations. This was a cross-sectional study; only subjective assessments of work functioning were obtained; the fact that patients were using varied medications acts as a potential confound. Conclusions. Specific depressive symptoms and medication side effects were perceived by patients as interfering more with occupational functioning than others. These factors should be considered in treatment selection (e.g., in the choice of antidepressant) in working patients with MDD. 1. Introduction Unipolar major depressive disorder (MDD) is among the most common and disabling medical conditions. Many epidemiological studies have demonstrated the high prevalence of MDD in the general population. For example, the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) recently reported a one-year prevalence rate of 4.5% for MDD, indicating that over 1.2 million Canadians suffer significant distress and impairment in functioning due to mood disorders [1]. Similar statistics are found for Europe [2] and the United States [3]. Depression is currently the fourth leading medical condition contributing to global burden of disease and is estimated to rise to second by the year 2030 [4]. Given the high prevalence of MDD, increasing attention is now being paid to the economic costs of depression. The economic burden is, in part, attributable to individuals with depression being unable to work, or absenteeism. For example, one study reported that workers with MDD missed an average of 32 days of work in a 12-month assessment period [5], while another found that about 30% of work disability claims in Canada were attributed to mental
A critical exploration of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework from the perspective of oncology: recommendations for revision
Bornbaum CC, Doyle PC, Skarakis-Doyle E, Theurer JA
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare , 2013, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S40020
Abstract: critical exploration of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework from the perspective of oncology: recommendations for revision Review (198) Total Article Views Authors: Bornbaum CC, Doyle PC, Skarakis-Doyle E, Theurer JA Published Date March 2013 Volume 2013:6 Pages 75 - 86 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JMDH.S40020 Received: 07 November 2012 Accepted: 12 January 2013 Published: 08 March 2013 Catherine C Bornbaum,1 Philip C Doyle,1–3 Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle,1,2 Julie A Theurer2,3 1Graduate Program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 3Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Background: In 2001, the World Health Organization developed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework in an effort to attend to the multidimensional health-related concerns of individuals. Historically, although the ICF has frequently been used in a rehabilitation-based context, the World Health Organization has positioned it as a universal framework of health and its related states. Consequently, the ICF has been utilized for a diverse array of purposes in the field of oncology, including: evaluating functioning in individuals with cancer, guiding assessment in oncology rehabilitation, assessing the comprehensiveness of outcome measures utilized in oncology research, assisting in health-related quality of life instrument selection, and comparing the primary concerns of health professionals with those of their patients. Discussion: Examination of the ICF through the lens of cancer care highlights the fact that this framework can be a valuable tool to facilitate comprehensive care in oncology, but it currently possesses some areas of limitation that require conceptual revision; to this end, several recommendations have been proposed. Specifically, these proposed recommendations center on the following three areas of the ICF framework: (1) the replacement of the term “health condition” with the more inclusive and dynamic term “health state;” (2) the continuing development and refinement of the personal factors component to ensure issues such as comorbidities can be accounted for appropriately; and (3) the inclusion of a mechanism to account for the subjective dimension of health and functioning (eg, quality of life). Summary: It is through the expansion of these conceptual parameters that the ICF may become more relevant and applicable to the field of oncology. With these important revisions, the ICF has the potential to provide a broader biopsychosocial perspective of care that captures the diverse range of concerns that arise throughout the continuum of care in oncology.
A critical exploration of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework from the perspective of oncology: recommendations for revision  [cached]
Bornbaum CC,Doyle PC,Skarakis-Doyle E,Theurer JA
Journal of Multidisciplinary Healthcare , 2013,
Abstract: Catherine C Bornbaum,1 Philip C Doyle,1–3 Elizabeth Skarakis-Doyle,1,2 Julie A Theurer2,3 1Graduate Program in Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, 2School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 3Department of Otolaryngology – Head and Neck Surgery, Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, The University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada Background: In 2001, the World Health Organization developed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework in an effort to attend to the multidimensional health-related concerns of individuals. Historically, although the ICF has frequently been used in a rehabilitation-based context, the World Health Organization has positioned it as a universal framework of health and its related states. Consequently, the ICF has been utilized for a diverse array of purposes in the field of oncology, including: evaluating functioning in individuals with cancer, guiding assessment in oncology rehabilitation, assessing the comprehensiveness of outcome measures utilized in oncology research, assisting in health-related quality of life instrument selection, and comparing the primary concerns of health professionals with those of their patients. Discussion: Examination of the ICF through the lens of cancer care highlights the fact that this framework can be a valuable tool to facilitate comprehensive care in oncology, but it currently possesses some areas of limitation that require conceptual revision; to this end, several recommendations have been proposed. Specifically, these proposed recommendations center on the following three areas of the ICF framework: (1) the replacement of the term “health condition” with the more inclusive and dynamic term “health state;” (2) the continuing development and refinement of the personal factors component to ensure issues such as comorbidities can be accounted for appropriately; and (3) the inclusion of a mechanism to account for the subjective dimension of health and functioning (eg, quality of life). Summary: It is through the expansion of these conceptual parameters that the ICF may become more relevant and applicable to the field of oncology. With these important revisions, the ICF has the potential to provide a broader biopsychosocial perspective of care that captures the diverse range of concerns that arise throughout the continuum of care in oncology. Keywords: ICF, International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health, cancer, quality of life, personal factors, health condition
Distance learning courses in occupational medicine - Methods and good practice  [cached]
Wagner N,Wagner P,P Jayachandran
Indian Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine , 2005,
Abstract: The need for training in Occupational Medicine in India is well known. The majority of company doctors cannot leave their work and join a residence program. The question which course delivery mode - residential or blended or distance education - is appropriate to teach working company doctors is therefore an urgent one. ADULT EDUCATION: Adults learners - in contrast to young students - have a lot prior experiences and knowledge which they want to use. They have tight personal schedules and are very practical and goal-oriented. They usually have a fulltime work. Adults need more guides than lecturers. Immediate use, practice by doing and discussion groups are the most powerful tools in teaching. Lecturing seems to be the most ineffective teaching method. Distance education is widely used already in teaching occupational health & safety and occupational medicine (OSH) in other countries. Almost 100% of all post-graduate teaching in occupational medicine is done by distance education in the U. K. A "blended" course model seems appropriate for Occupational Medicine teaching. It has contact phases and self-learning phases The Indian Association of Occupational Health could play a leading role in expending high quality teaching in Occupational Medicine. These activities would contribute to the Government′s goals to strengthen Occupational Health in India. This article discusses distance education and online-teaching as one viable way to deliver high quality training in Occupational Medicine to working company doctors in India.
Identification of aspects of functioning, disability and health relevant to patients experiencing vertigo: a qualitative study using the international classification of functioning, disability and health
Martin Mueller, Edith Schuster, Ralf Strobl, Eva Grill
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7525-10-75
Abstract: We conducted a series of qualitative semi-structured face-to-face interviews using a descriptive approach. Data was analyzed using the meaning condensation procedure and then linked to categories of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF).From May to July 2010 12 interviews were carried out until saturation was reached. Four hundred and seventy-one single concepts were extracted which were linked to 142 different ICF categories. 40 of those belonged to the component body functions, 62 to the component activity and participation, and 40 to the component environmental factors. Besides the most prominent aspect “dizziness” most participants reported problems within “Emotional functions (b152), problems related to mobility and carrying out the daily routine. Almost all participants reported “Immediate family (e310)” as a relevant modifying environmental factor.From the patients’ perspective, vertigo has impact on multifaceted aspects of functioning and disability, mainly body functions and activities and participation. Modifying contextual factors have to be taken into account to cover the complex interaction between the health condition of vertigo on the individuals’ daily life. The results of this study will contribute to developing standards for the measurement of functioning, disability and health relevant for patients suffering from vertigo.
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