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Teachers' Experiences in Online Professional Development Environment  [PDF]
Bahar BARAN,Kursat CAGILTAY
The Turkish Online Journal of Distance Education , 2006,
Abstract: s qualitative study aims to explore teachers’ opinions on traditional professional development (PD) courses and their experiences from an online course. 10 teachers from a private school participated in an online professional development (PD) course. After completing the course, they evaluated their PD experience. A focus group discussion and individual interviews were performed to collect data. The teachers determined the problems in traditional PD courses and online PD courses. They generally emphasized the lack of practice in both traditional and online PD courses. Further, abundance of theoretical concepts and context independent examples are determined as other problems. They proposed that PD programs should be developed together by both academician and expert teacher.
PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF TEACHERS
DR.S.KAYARKANNI
Indian Streams Research Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Professional development for teachers is the range of formal and informal processes and activities that teachers engage in both inside and outside of the school, in order to improve their teaching knowledge and skills. The ultimate goal of teacher professional development is improving student learning outcomes. Research indicates that teachers have control over many factors that influence motivation, achievement and behaviour of their students. Therefore, professional development focusing on effective classroom management will enhance a teacher's skills and performance in the classroom.
Teachers Helping Teachers: A Professional Development Model that Promotes Teacher Leadership  [cached]
Norma Ghamrawi
International Education Studies , 2013, DOI: 10.5539/ies.v6n4p171
Abstract: This mixed methods study reports on the outcomes of a professional development model (PDM) developed by a K-12 private school in Beirut, Lebanon, after 3 years of its employment. Specifically, an evaluation of this PDM is provided with special emphasis on its potential of developing teacher leaders at school. The PDM embraces a constructivist approach whereby teachers train colleague teachers and some high school students provide ushering services during professional development events. Data was collected using focus group interviews with teacher trainers, surveying teacher trainees and asking student ushers to describe their most important gain from this model using a single statement. Findings of the study highlight resonant school gains from this PDM and underscore its potential in developing not only teacher leadership but also student leadership. The study provides important implications for professional development program designers.
Using Contracted Solution Graphs for Solving Reconfiguration Problems  [PDF]
Paul Bonsma,Daniel Paulusma
Computer Science , 2015,
Abstract: We introduce in a general setting a dynamic programming method for solving reconfiguration problems. Our method is based on contracted solution graphs, which are obtained from solution graphs by performing an appropriate series of edge contractions that decrease the graph size without losing any critical information needed to solve the reconfiguration problem under consideration. Our general framework captures the approach behind known reconfiguration results of Bonsma (2012) and Hatanaka, Ito and Zhou (2014). As a third example, we apply the method to the following problem: given two $k$-colorings $\alpha$ and $\beta$ of a graph $G$, can $\alpha$ be modified into $\beta$ by recoloring one vertex of $G$ at a time, while maintaining a $k$-coloring throughout? This problem is known to be PSPACE-hard even for bipartite planar graphs and $k=4$. By applying our method in combination with a thorough exploitation of the graph structure we obtain a polynomial time algorithm for $(k-2)$-connected chordal graphs.
An Alternative Model of Continuing Professional Development for Teachers: Giving Teachers Time  [cached]
Terry Haydn,Roy Barton,Ann Oliver
International Education Studies , 2008, DOI: 10.5539/ies.v1n1p44
Abstract: The paper reports on the outcomes of a Department of Culture, Museums and Sport (DCMS) funded project which provided resources for three groups of teachers in different subjects and age phases to have some time where they were freed from their teaching responsibilities, and also given time to meet together with other teachers to share ideas. The idea underpinning the project was to explore a model of continuing professional development for teachers which was different in approach to recent Department for Education and Skills (DfES) ‘strategy’ and training based approaches. The three groups of teachers (primary science, secondary history and secondary science) met together with curriculum tutors from the local School of Education to explore ideas about how to develop innovative approaches in aspects of their subject teaching. In addition to funding four days of supply cover for the teachers involved to meet, the teachers were also given at least two days of supply cover during the course of the project to develop their ideas. Towards the end of both academic years, the groups met again to share their ideas. The paper describes the outcomes of the project and the teachers’ perceptions of the process issues and problems involved in pedagogical innovation. The paper also considers some of the broader issues arising from the project, in terms of how to make the most effective use of teachers’ time, in an era when there are many competing demands on this finite resource.
Job satisfaction amongst teachers at special needs schools
L Strydom, N Nortjé, R Beukes, K Esterhuyse, J van der Westhuizen
South African Journal of Education , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of this study was to establish the level of job satisfaction amongst teachers at special schools. Teachers in special schools need to cope with curriculum changes, the administrative duties that come with these changes, and the learners with their diverse needs. Learners with special needs require a specific educational programme and also schools that cater for the needs of learners with emotional, social, neurological or physical problems. The research group consisted of 101 teachers working at six different special schools situated in various parts of the Bloemfontein area, two in the Mangaung area, and four were situated in suburban areas. The group consisted of English- and Afrikaans-speaking teachers of both genders and from different race groups. The data for this study were compiled by means of a short biographical questionnaire and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. The results indicated that the teachers experienced an average level of job satisfaction. In addition to this finding, differences were also found in the levels of job satisfaction between different races, but not between genders.
Job satisfaction amongst teachers at special needs schools
Louise Strydom,Nico Nortjé,Roelf Beukes,Karel Esterhuyse
South African Journal of Education , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of this study was to establish the level ofjob satisfaction amongst teachers at special schools. Teachers in special schools need to cope with curriculum changes, the administrative duties that come with these changes, and the learners with their diverse needs. Learners with special needs require a specific educational programme and also schools that caterfor the needs of learners with emotional, social, neurological or physical problems. The research group consisted of 101 teachers working at six different special schools situated in various parts of the Bloemfontein area, two in the Mangaung area, and four were situated in suburban areas. The group consisted of English- and Afrikaans-speaking teachers of both genders and from different race groups. The data for this study were compiled by means of a short biographical questionnaire and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. The results indicated that the teachers experienced an average level of job satisfaction. In addition to this finding, differences were also found in the levels ofjob satisfaction between different races, but not between genders.
Comparison of the professional activities of Slovak, Czech and Polish teachers at primary school level
Simoneta Babiaková
Pedagogicka Orientace , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of the paper is to compare the professional activities of teachersfrom the three participating countries in terms of the time load. In the introduction,the author deals with the term professiography“ of teachers and focuses on thecontemporary professiographic research that, among other things, inspired thepresented international research into the teachers’ professional activities. The nextpart of the paper describes the research objectives, strategy and methods. In thestudy, the author analyzes mainly activities that are directly related to the instructionand specifies the time the primary education teachers spent on them. Researchfindings show that the Czech teachers spend more time on preparing the instruction,assessing the pupils and correcting their work than their Slovak or Polish colleagues.The teachers from Slovakia allocate most of their time on explaining the instructionalcontent and the Polish teachers mostly motivate their pupils during the instruction and create individual plans for pupils with special needs. We also found that the timeload of primary education teachers in their profession is increasing when comparedto the past and apart from the activities directly or indirectly connected with teaching,they spend a lot of time on education and self-education brought by the changingsocial and professional conditions.
PRINCIPLES OF THE INCLUSIVE EDUCATION AND THE ROLE OF TEACHERS AND IN-SCHOOL PROFESSIONAL STAFF  [PDF]
Ognen SPASOVSKI
Journal of Special Education and Rehabilitation , 2010,
Abstract: According to the Salamanca Declaration, inclusive education is understood as a developmental approach aiming to meet the educational needs of all children, youth, and adults, emphasizing those who are subjected to marginalization and exclusion. The approach provides equal opportunities for all to reach their maximum potential and achievement.Through a qualitative approach, the practice of inclusive education is explored in Macedonia: the attainment of universal standards, an analysis of the perception and understanding of inclusive education in relation to teachers, in-school professional staff, teacher educators and student teachers, and teachers’ perceptions in regard to the possession of competencies needed for inclusive education. Lastly, the existing role and responsibilities of teachers and professional staff is discussed and reconsidered.It was found that there is no consensus in the understanding of inclusive education in the circles of academics and practitioners. Further, teachers often perceive themselves as inadequately prepared to teach children with special needs. Namely, many competencies important for efficient practice are not systematically developed. The conclusion considers ways to ensure support for teachers and students. The role and responsibilities of in-school professional staff should be redefined in a way that allows for their on-going presence, availability, and active participation in the classroom teaching process.
Arabic Language Teachers in the State of Michigan: Views of Their Professional Needs  [PDF]
Hassan Wafa
Open Journal of Modern Linguistics (OJML) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/ojml.2014.45053
Abstract: A full-day summer conference directed by this investigator took place in Dearborn city under the umbrella of Western Michigan University for professional development of Arabic teachers serving public, private, and academic charter schools in Michigan. The theoretical framework for conducting the conference was focused on the issue of teaching strategies as well as the needs assessment of teachers for improving their professional development. A group of fifty teachers volunteered to participate in the conference and were asked to complete a twelve-item questionnaire designed to provide their professional profile and their preference in developing professional development. Their professional profile included years of Arabic teaching experience in the United States, teaching level (elementary school, middle school, or high school), teaching certificate, academic credentials, and type of school (public, private, or charter school). The findings indicated that among the ten sub-items related to the professional development skills of the teachers, “Implementing differentiated language instruction” was rated by the participating teachers as the most important components of their professional development skills; followed in order by “Integrating technology and Arabic instruction”; “Using effective learner-centered teaching strategies”; “Using and maintaining Arabic language”; “Implementing a standards-based curriculum”; “Developing curriculum and thematic units”; “Implementing performance assessment methods”; “Conducting constructive action research in Arabic instruction”; “Conducting the Oral Proficiency Interview”; and “Learning how to be a certified Arabic language teacher in Michigan”. In response to the questions regarding the role of Council in supporting Arabic teachers, the participating teachers made a number of constructive suggestions to help improve the quality of teaching Arabic with special focus on facilitating appropriate teaching materials and other instructional tools as a part of curriculum development.
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