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The renewal of social democracy and the third way” of the British Labour Party
Havas Peter
Medjunarodni Problemi , 2003, DOI: 10.2298/medjp0302237h
Abstract: The author tries to enlighten and analyse the current processes in the European Social Democracy intending to renew its strategy and doctrine and adapt it to the new economic, political and social challenges. He devotes special attention to the attempts of the British Labour Party to modernise itself and create a new doctrinal approach, the so-called third way. The author analyses the history of the New Labour and characteristics of the Tony Blair-led party, elaborating in detail the contents of the third way. The main conclusion he makes is that, in spite of the New Labour’s success at the two last general elections in Britain and the positive lessons to be drawn from the third way, it does not mean that all Social Democratic Parties should follow that example, for different social conditions demand different strategies and policies and relevant responses by every party.
The Muslim Brotherhood and Islamic "democracy" in Egypt as part of the New World Order. Part II: Towards a New Form of a Client Regime
Takis Fotopoulos
International Journal of Inclusive Democracy , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of this article is to show that the Muslim Brotherhood's rise to power in Egypt (as well as in Tunisia before it) has been engineered by the transnational elite, with the help of the local elites and the US-dependent local armies, since the previous client autocratic regimes were politically bankrupt and clearly incapable of imposing the "economic restructuring" required by neoliberal globalization without the occurrence of serious social turbulence. The Muslim Brotherhood's rise to power will secure the integration of the countries concerned into the New World Order of neoliberal globalization and representative "democracy" in a new form of more sophisticated client regime based on Islamic "democratization," whereby all the rituals and paraphernalia of "democracy" are present. The first part of this article deals with the Muslim Brotherhood’s rise to power and attempts to explain why it was chosen as the main instrument of the New World Order in the Middle East. The second part puts forward the case that the Muslim Brotherhood's rise to power represents a new form of "democratic" client regime in the Middle East, in place of the autocratic client regimes which had been dominant in the area since the end of the Second World War.
Muslim localizing democracy: a non-pesantren village in Madura as a preliminary study
M. Endy Saputro
Indonesian Journal of Islam and Muslim Societies , 2011,
Abstract: The political dynamic of village in Indonesian New Order has two faces. On one hand, it is conditioned by the feudalism of village’s leader which is monopolized from one generation to other generations. On the other hand, religion can be an alternative to challenge this feudalism. I explore this condition through an examination of the role of kalebun(the village’s leader) and kiaiin a non-pesantren village in Madura, Indonesia. In Madura society , kiaiand its pesantrentake important role in the process of Islamic institutionalization. Y et, in this case, the absence of pesantrenenforces the kiaito be counter-balance of the feudalism of the kalebun. And, the kiaiclaims that this counter-balance is on behalf of democracy . This article concludes with a discussion of the requirement of democracy in “Islamic” local politics as well as in search of good local governance in post Indonesian New Order.
Is Islam Compatible with Democracy
Carmen A. Abubakar
Kasarinlan : Philippine Journal of Third World Studies , 1996,
Abstract: After the transition to democracy of socialist states in Eastern Europe and other authoritarian states in Asia and Latin America, which captured worldwide attention, the lenses now shift to Muslim states. Perceived as inherently authoritarian, Muslim societies invite criticism from the West as being incapable with democracy. In turn, the Muslims, though recognizing the precepts of democracy, question the validity of Western orthodoxy by challenging the exacting, secular model of democracy. They argue that the term “democracy” has been arbitrarily, as authoritarian and socialist states alike appropriate it their own designs. Moreover, they of the view that there is as yet no universally accepted and encompassing definition of democracy. In the final analysis, if the leaders, the people, and ultimately the state remain true to Islamic ideal, democracy would most likely have the same resonance in Muslim societies as elsewhere in the world.
The Muslim Brotherhood and Islamic
Takis Fotopoulos
International Journal of Inclusive Democracy , 2012,
Abstract: The aim of this article is to show that the Muslim Brotherhood's rise to power in Egypt (as well as in Tunisia before it) has been engineered by the transnational elite, with the help of the local elites and the US-dependent local armies, since the previous client autocratic regimes were politically bankrupt and clearly incapable of imposing the "economic restructuring" required by neoliberal globalization without the occurrence of serious social turbulence. The Muslim Brotherhood's rise to power will secure the integration of the countries concerned into the New World Order of neoliberal globalization and representative "democracy" in a new form of more sophisticated client regime based on Islamic "democratization," whereby all the rituals and paraphernalia of "democracy" are present. The first part of this article deals with the Muslim Brotherhood’s rise to power and attempts to explain why it was chosen as the main instrument of the New World Order in the Middle East. The second part puts forward the case that the Muslim Brotherhood's rise to power represents a new form of "democratic" client regime in the Middle East, in place of the autocratic client regimes which had been dominant in the area since the end of the Second World War.
Official Discourses and Patterns of State Engagement with Muslim Communities in Britain and Russia
Ekaterina Braginskaia
Diversities , 2010,
Abstract: The article discusses the institutional complexities and policy discourses of Muslim governance and representation in Britain and Russia in light of the distinct national narratives of state-Muslim relations. Religious governance is not only determined by the patterns of state-religion relations but is also influenced by the level of state involvement. The article focuses on a series of interactions between state officials and Muslim representative institutions to highlight individual patterns and discourses of the two approaches to religious accommodation: ‘horizontal’ and ‘vertical’. The British horizontal approach focuses on liberal multiculturalism and its communitarian preference for resolving internal tensions within local communities. Russia’s increasingly conservative policy of consolidating Muslim institutions and building strong relations with official Muslim representatives is typical of the vertical approach. Over the last 10 to 15 years, state policies on Muslim integration and representation have revealed a similar desire to promote moderate forms of Islam. This is evident from extended programmes of state-funding for Muslim communities and stronger cooperation with Muslim representative institutions. A close analysis of state engagement with Muslim Councils brings to light the internal dynamics of horizontal and vertical state-Muslim relations in the two countries.
Engagement of Muslim Women in Governance and Public Administration: The Ilorin Emirate Experience
Alanamu Ayinla Saadu
Pakistan Journal of Social Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Muslim women through the ages have contributed immensely to the socio-political and economic development of various societies. Considerable number of Muslim women had in the past decades involved actively in the governance of their nations. This study focuses on the status and role of Muslim women in democratic governance and public administration in Ilorin Emirate, Kwara State of Nigeria from 1999-2007. Since 1999, when democracy recommenced in Nigeria, few Muslim women in Ilorin Emirate have emerged as commissioners, board members and functionaries in other public sphere. It argues that Muslim women’s involvement in governance and in the conduct of public life has a great deal of impact on the improvement of their social position and the process of their empowerment. It submits with certain suggestions towards enhancing the performance of Muslim women in governance and public administration in the Emirate.
Islam and Democracy
Edgard Weber
Revista CIDOB d'Afers Internacionals , 1998,
Abstract: Edgard Weber raises the issue of the societal statute given to an individual in different cultures. Evidently, an historic change has occurred. To illustrate this, he puts forth the case of the Muslim-Arabic culture, which grants the individual in society a statute different from that of other Western, Judaic-Christian cultures. The author centralizes his study on the concept of democracy and shows the distinctiveness of the Islamic conceptions of State and of the individual when compared to the West’s. Plainly, it would be erroneousto affirm the superiority of one system over the other. Rather, the issue is, before anything else, a matter of comprehending the function each system fulfills, of understanding how both may begin the next century in better conditions, and of seeing how these realizations may lead mankind towards a more universal dimension that banishes the demons of racism, exclusion, and war.
Debating as an educational method to science and citizenship
Sara Calcagnini
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2007,
Abstract: If one of aims of science today is to respond to the real needs of society, it must find a new way to communicate with people and to be acquainted with their opinions and knowledge. Many science museums in Europe are adopting new ways to actively engage the public in the debate on topical scientific issues. The Museum of Science and Technology "Leonardo da Vinci" in Milan (partner of the SEDEC project) has thus experimented some formats for dialogue with teachers and with the public in general. Our experience shows that museums can be places where science and the public on the one hand and democracy on the other meet.
Exporting Democracy and Liberating Women: An Examination of a Debilitating Rhetoric  [cached]
Mais Qutami,Suha Qutami
English Language and Literature Studies , 2013, DOI: 10.5539/ells.v3n1p122
Abstract: Democracy and freedom are valuable principles and main constituents of the American “way of life” which many countries aspire to. This may be true, but when such a freeing democracy is exported in a standardized western style and imposed on other nations, it becomes oppressive, debilitating, and uninspiring. This paper examines the double standards used in relation to issues of democracy and veiling within US rhetoric and hegemonic discourses. It also highlights what US democracy means to nations like Afghanistan, Egypt, and Iraq. It aims to underline the impact of the rhetoric of freedom and democracy on the Muslim world. This argument has important implications for theory and practice directed at disturbing dominant discourses of democracy and veiling.
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