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Efficacy and tolerability of Laxatan® Granulat in patients with chronic constipation  [cached]
Joerg Gruenwald,Regina Busch,Christine Bentley
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology , 2009,
Abstract: Joerg Gruenwald, Regina Busch, Christine BentleyAnalyze and Realize AG, Berlin, GermanyBackground: On average 12% of the population worldwide suffer from acute or chronic constipation. Pathological intestine alterations, an unhealthy diet with reduced liquid intake, and little exercise are potential reasons. Often the motility of the intestine is disturbed. Changing nutrition habits or lifestyle is not always successful. In such cases, laxatives containing macrogol and inulin are highly effective.Methodology: The efficacy and tolerability of Laxatan Granulat, a laxative containing macrogol, inulin, and mineral salts, was assessed in a drug-monitoring study of 105 patients for four weeks.Results: At the end of this study, a highly significant reduction of the constipation symptoms in 98.1% of the patients was observed. No adverse events were reported during this drug-monitoring study. The overall efficacy was rated as being “very good” or “good” for 96% and the overall tolerability was rated as being “very good” or “good” for 99% of patients.Conclusion: The combination of macrogol, inulin, and mineral salts is highly effective in the treatment of chronic constipation. Due to its prebiotic activity, inulin probably leads to proliferation of lactic acid-producing bacteria. The lowered pH and increased water content probably increases the peristaltic action and therefore reduces constipation.Keywords: Laxatan , macrogol, inulin, constipation
Efficacy and tolerability of Laxatan Granulat in patients with chronic constipation
Joerg Gruenwald, Regina Busch, Christine Bentley
Clinical and Experimental Gastroenterology , 2009, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CEG.S6236
Abstract: acy and tolerability of Laxatan Granulat in patients with chronic constipation Original Research (5014) Total Article Views Authors: Joerg Gruenwald, Regina Busch, Christine Bentley Published Date September 2009 Volume 2009:2 Pages 95 - 100 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/CEG.S6236 Joerg Gruenwald, Regina Busch, Christine Bentley Analyze and Realize AG, Berlin, Germany Background: On average 12% of the population worldwide suffer from acute or chronic constipation. Pathological intestine alterations, an unhealthy diet with reduced liquid intake, and little exercise are potential reasons. Often the motility of the intestine is disturbed. Changing nutrition habits or lifestyle is not always successful. In such cases, laxatives containing macrogol and inulin are highly effective. Methodology: The efficacy and tolerability of Laxatan Granulat, a laxative containing macrogol, inulin, and mineral salts, was assessed in a drug-monitoring study of 105 patients for four weeks. Results: At the end of this study, a highly significant reduction of the constipation symptoms in 98.1% of the patients was observed. No adverse events were reported during this drug-monitoring study. The overall efficacy was rated as being “very good” or “good” for 96% and the overall tolerability was rated as being “very good” or “good” for 99% of patients. Conclusion: The combination of macrogol, inulin, and mineral salts is highly effective in the treatment of chronic constipation. Due to its prebiotic activity, inulin probably leads to proliferation of lactic acid-producing bacteria. The lowered pH and increased water content probably increases the peristaltic action and therefore reduces constipation.
Lifestyle Index and Self-Rated Health Status
Magdalena Kwa niewska, Dorota Kaleta, El bieta Dziankowska-Zaborszczy, Wojciech Drygas, , Teresa Makowiec-D browska
International Journal of Occupational Medicine and Environmental Health , 2007, DOI: 10.2478/v10001-007-0033-1
Abstract: Objectives: The aim of the study was to analyze the influence of selected lifestyle factors on self-rated health status in working age population. Materials and Methods: The study population derived from the national Polish representative WOBASZ study. The sample consisted of 1222 randomly selected residents of two Polish districts, aged 20-64 years (52.3% women and 47.7% men). We analyzed four health-related behaviors as lifestyle factors that made up the lifestyle index: non-smoking, adequate fruit and vegetable intake, healthy weight, and sufficient physical activity. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals to investigate the impact of lifestyle on self-rated health. Results: The findings revealed that 4.2, 17.6, 37 and 35.2% of women and 6.4, 19.9, 36.5 and 34.1% of men had the lifestyle index score of 0, 1, 2, 3 points, respectively. Only 6.1% of women and 3.1% of men met all the four criteria of a healthy lifestyle (score 4). Self-rated health was regarded as poor/fair, good or very good by 39.1, 54.3, 6.6% of women and 31.6, 60.7, 7.7% of men, respectively. Poor/fair self-rated health was strongly associated with obesity both in the male and female population. Among men with the lifestyle index score of 0 points, the risk of poor/fair self-rated health was 3.5 times as high (OR = 3.52; 95% CI: 1.36-9.12) as in men with the index score of 4. For women with the scores of 3, 2, 1, and 0, the risk of poor/fair self-rated health was nearly three (OR = 2.89; 95% CI: 1.5-5.56), four (OR = 3.61; 95% CI: 1.88-6.93), six (OR = 5.93; 95% CI: 2.88-12.21) and seven times (OR = 6.67; 95% CI: 1.97-22.51) as high as for those with the lifestyle index score of 4. Conclusions: There is a need for implementing more effective health promotion interventions in the society, with special regard to weight reduction programs.
Lifestyle Behaviors and Self-Rated Health: The Living for Health Program  [PDF]
Gustavo G. Zarini,Joan A. Vaccaro,Maria A. Canossa Terris,Joel C. Exebio,Laura Tokayer,Janet Antwi,Sahar Ajabshir,Amanpreet Cheema,Fatma G. Huffman
Journal of Environmental and Public Health , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/315042
Abstract: Background. Lack of adherence to dietary and physical activity guidelines has been linked to an increase in chronic diseases in the United States (US). The aim of this study was to assess the association of lifestyle behaviors with self-rated health (SRH). Methods. This cross-sectional study used self-reported data from Living for Health Program ( 1,701) which was conducted from 2008 to 2012 in 190 health fair events in South Florida, US. Results. Significantly higher percent of females as compared to males were classified as obese (35.4% versus 27.0%), reported poor/fair SRH (23.4% versus 15.0%), and were less physically active (33.9% versus 25.4%). Adjusted logistic regression models indicated that both females and males were more likely to report poor/fair SRH if they consumed 2 servings of fruits and vegetables per day (, 95% CI 1.30–3.54; , 95% CI 1.12–7.35, resp.) and consumed mostly high fat foods (, 95% CI 1.03–2.43; , 95% CI 1.67–2.43, resp.). The association of SRH with less physical activity was only significant in females (, 95% CI 1.17–2.35). Conclusion. Gender differences in health behaviors should be considered in designing and monitoring lifestyle interventions to prevent cardiovascular diseases. 1. Introduction Self-evaluation of general health status has been associated with actual health in that what people report about their health has been shown to predict mortality [1]. Self-rated health (SRH) as a single survey question developed by the World Health Organization (WHO) [2] has been validated as a tool to predict mortality in populations with and without cardiovascular diseases [1–3] and functional ability [4, 5]. Asking participants to describe their overall health on a five-point scale (ranging from excellent to poor) has achieved popularity as a health-indicating tool in the United States (US) and other countries [6, 7]. Health is largely influenced by modifiable risk factors such as diet and physical activity [8]. Noncommunicable diseases are the leading causes of death globally [9]. Worldwide, noncommunicable diseases (cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and chronic lung diseases) are largely attributed to four main behavioral factors: tobacco use, unhealthy diet, insufficient physical activity, and harmful alcohol use [9]. Poor health for persons with chronic diseases has been attributed largely to a lack of adherence to medical recommendations which include diet and physical activity. High consumption of fruits and vegetables resulted in a lower incidence of cardiovascular disease in nurses and health professionals in
Predictors of Self-Rated Health and Lifestyle Behaviours in Swedish University Students  [cached]
Manuela Schmidt
Global Journal of Health Science , 2012, DOI: 10.5539/gjhs.v4n4p1
Abstract: Background: Lifestyle behaviours are usually formed during youth or young adulthood which makes college students a particularly vulnerable group that easily can adopt unhealthy lifestyle behaviour. Aim: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the influence of socio-demographic factors on Swedish university students’ lifestyle behaviours and self-rated health. Method: Data were collected from a convenience sample of 152 students using questionnaires consisting of a socio-demographic section followed by previously well-validated instruments. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics: t-tests, analysis of variance (ANOVA) and regression tests. Findings: The results of this study show that the lifestyle behaviours under study (physical activity, perceived stress and eating behaviours) as well as self-rated health can be predicted to a certain extent by socio-demographic factors such as gender, mother tongue and parents’ educational level. Male university students were shown to be physically more active than female students; the male students were less stressed and rated their overall health, fitness level and mental health higher. Female students were more prone to adopt unhealthy eating behaviours. Discussion: This study addresses gender differences and their influences on lifestyle behaviours; it provides both theoretical explanations for these differences as well as presents some practical implications of the findings.
Correlates of Self-Rated Business Competencies  [cached]
Adrian Furnham,Angela Mansi
International Journal of Business and Management , 2011, DOI: 10.5539/ijbm.v6n9p3
Abstract: Two studies that focussed on sex differences in self-rated management competencies are reported. In the first study 197 working adults (125 female, 72 male) rated themselves on the nine competencies listed by Boyaztis (1982). There were overall few significant sex differences. The ratings of the nine competencies factored in two coherent factors. There were various individual difference predictors of the total competency rating and the two factor scores. Older participants with higher Openness-to-Experience trait gave higher overall self-estimates. In the second study 173 adults (108 female, 65 male) rated themselves on the 12 independent “super-competencies” specified by Dulewicz (1999). Again there were few significant sex differences. Factor analysis revealed two recognisable factors. Extraverts tended to give higher self-estimates than introverts. The results are discussed in terms of the literature on self-assessed abilities and business competencies.
EVALUATION OF DIET, LIFE STYLE AND STRESS IN THE ETIOPATHOGENESIS OF CONSTIPATION IN GERIATRIC PEOPLE  [PDF]
Lingu Inya,Kulkarni Prasad V,Tanna Ila,Chandola H M
International Journal of Research in Ayurveda and Pharmacy , 2012,
Abstract: Diet, lifestyle and mental status are known to play pivotal roles in the occurrence of many chronic diseases. Constipation is one amongst them, which is the commonest complain and significant healthcare problem especially in elderly that increases with age and affect ones physical and mental wellbeing. It is the premonitory symptoms of many existing or forthcoming diseases. In the present study, the survey of elderly patients with constipation has been done to evaluate the patterns of dietary habits, life style and mental health along with their relationships with risk factors for constipation in Saurashtra region of Gujarat especially in the Jamnagar city. Data shows that the majority of the patients were male. Of all the respondents, stress, sedentary lifestyle, lack of exercise, and ruksha (dry), sheeta (cold) diets , bad eating habits like vishamashana (irregularity in time and quantity of meal), viruddhashana (incompatible diet) were found to be linked to constipation. The elders reporting constipation had tension, anxious mood, depressed mood, disturbed sleep and delayed onset of sleep.
Lubiprostone: a novel treatment for chronic constipation  [cached]
Brian E Lacy,L Campbell Levy
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2008,
Abstract: Brian E Lacy, L Campbell LevySection of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon NH, USAAbstract: Chronic constipation is highly prevalent, reduces patients’ quality of life, and imposes a significant health care burden on society. Lifestyle modifications and over-the-counter agents improve symptoms of constipation in some patients, however many patients have persistent symptoms and require the use of prescription medications. Three prescription medications are currently Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved and available for the treatment of chronic constipation in adults. This review will focus on lubiprostone, the newest medication available for the treatment of chronic constipation. Lubiprostone is a bicyclic fatty acid metabolite analogue of prostaglandin E1. It activates specific chloride channels in the gastrointestinal tract to stimulate intestinal fluid secretion, increase gastrointestinal transit, and improve symptoms of constipation. This article will provide a brief overview on chloride channel function in the gastrointestinal tract, describe the structure, function, and pharmacokinetics of lubiprostone, and discuss the safety and efficacy of this new medication.Keywords: chloride, chloride channels, constipation, functional bowel disorders, gastrointestinal motility, intestinal secretion, irritable bowel syndrome, lubiprostone
Lifestyle and self-rated health: a cross-sectional study of 3,601 citizens of Athens, Greece
Christina Darviri, Artemios K Artemiadis, Xanthi Tigani, Evangelos C Alexopoulos
BMC Public Health , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-11-619
Abstract: In this one-year cross-sectional study, a stratified random sample of 3,601 urban citizens was selected. Data were collected using an interview-based questionnaire about various demographic, socioeconomic, disease- and lifestyle related factors such as smoking, physical activity, dietary habits, sleep quality and religiosity. Multivariate logistic regression was used separately in three age groups [15-29 (N = 1,360), 30-49 (N = 1,122) and 50+ (N = 1,119) years old] in order to identify putative lifestyle and other determinants of SRH.Reporting of good SRH decreased with age (97.1%, 91.4% and 74.8%, respectively). Overall, possible confounders of the lifestyle-SRH relationship among age groups were sex, education, hospitalization during the last year, daily physical symptoms and disease status. Poor SRH was associated with less physical activity in the 15-29 years old (OR 2.22, 95%CI 1.14-4.33), with past or heavy smoking, along with no sleep satisfaction in the 30-49 years old (OR 3.23, 95%CI 1.35-7.74, OR 2.56, 95%CI 1.29-5.05, OR 1.79, 95%CI 1.1-2.92, respectively) and with obesity and no sleep satisfaction in the 50+ years old individuals (OR 1.83, 95%CI 1.19-2.81, OR 2.54, 95%CI 1.83-3.54). Sleep dissatisfaction of the 50+ years old was the only variable associated with poor SRH at the 0.001 p level of significance (OR 2.45, 99%CI 1.59 to 3.76). Subgroup analyses of the 15-19 years old individuals also revealed sleep dissatisfaction as the only significant variable correlated with SRH.Slight differences in lifestyle determinants of SRH were identified among age groups. Sleep quality emerged as an important determinant of SRH in the majority of participants.Self-rated health (SRH) is among the most widely used health measures in epidemiological and medical research that it is based on the individual's perception of his/her health status rated in a four or five-point scale [1]. Self-assessment of health is considered a complex cognitive process that integrates hea
Self-rated health among Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami adolescents: associated risk and protective correlates
Anna Rita Spein,Cecilia Petrine Pedersen,Anne Cathrine Silviken,Marita Melhus
International Journal of Circumpolar Health , 2013, DOI: 10.3402/ijch.v72i0.19793
Abstract: Objectives. Self-rated health (SRH) and associated risk and protective correlates were investigated among two indigenous adolescent populations, Greenlandic Inuit and Norwegian Sami. Design. Cross-sectional data were collected from “Well-being among Youth in Greenland” (WBYG) and “The Norwegian Arctic Adolescent Health Study” (NAAHS), conducted during 2003–2005 and comprising 10th and 11th graders, 378 Inuit and 350 Sami. Methods. SRH was assessed by one single item, using a 4-point and 5-point scale for NAAHS and WBYG, respectively. Logistic regressions were performed separately for each indigenous group using a dichotomous measure with “very good” (NAAHS) and “very good/good” (WBYG) as reference categories. We simultaneously controlled for various socio-demographics, risk correlates (drinking, smoking, violence and suicidal behaviour) and protective correlates (physical activity, well-being in school, number of close friends and adolescent–parent relationship). Results. A majority of both Inuit (62%) and Sami (89%) youth reported “good” or “very good” SRH. The proportion of “poor/fair/not so good” SRH was three times higher among Inuit than Sami (38% vs. 11%, p≤0.001). Significantly more Inuit females than males reported “poor/fair” SRH (44% vs. 29%, p≤0.05), while no gender differences occurred among Sami (12% vs. 9%, p≤0.08). In both indigenous groups, suicidal thoughts (risk) and physical activity (protective) were associated with poor and good SRH, respectively. Conclusions. In accordance with other studies of indigenous adolescents, suicidal thoughts were strongly associated with poorer SRH among Sami and Inuit. The Inuit–Sami differences in SRH could partly be due to higher “risk” and lower “protective” correlates among Inuit than Sami. The positive impact of physical activity on SRH needs to be targeted in future intervention programs.
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