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Family Care, Social Services, and Living Arrangements Factors Influencing Psychosocial Well-Being of Elderly from Selected Households in Ibadan, Nigeria  [PDF]
D. Oladeji
Education Research International , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/421898
Abstract: This study examined family care, social services, and living arrangements factors influencing the psychosocial well-being of the elderly from selected households in Ibadan, Nigeria. The participants for the study consisted of 280 elderly persons randomly drawn from selected households in five local government areas of Ibadan metropolis. A descriptive survey design was employed in collecting the data from the respondents. Data collected were analyzed using chi-square (2) statistics. Results obtained indicated that significant relationships existed between family care (2=127.9, df = 12, <.05), social services (2=191.9, df = 12, <.05), and living arrangements (2=14.4, df = 6, <.05) and psychosocial well-being of elderly. The results implicate the need for the framework on the complex system of the elderly services. These areas of service include economic services, attitudes toward aging, roles played by the elderly, and health care services.
Family Care, Social Services, and Living Arrangements Factors Influencing Psychosocial Well-Being of Elderly from Selected Households in Ibadan, Nigeria  [PDF]
D. Oladeji
Education Research International , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/421898
Abstract: This study examined family care, social services, and living arrangements factors influencing the psychosocial well-being of the elderly from selected households in Ibadan, Nigeria. The participants for the study consisted of 280 elderly persons randomly drawn from selected households in five local government areas of Ibadan metropolis. A descriptive survey design was employed in collecting the data from the respondents. Data collected were analyzed using chi-square ( ) statistics. Results obtained indicated that significant relationships existed between family care ( , df = 12, ), social services ( , df = 12, ), and living arrangements ( , df = 6, ) and psychosocial well-being of elderly. The results implicate the need for the framework on the complex system of the elderly services. These areas of service include economic services, attitudes toward aging, roles played by the elderly, and health care services. 1. Introduction Aging is not an entirely negative process, but old age is undoubtedly a difficult period, worsened by the inadequacy of social institutions to care for the aged [1]. Some studies have found no differences among the young and the elderly on measures of satisfaction, morale, and general happiness, and some studies show that elderly have a more positive self-concept than the younger ones. Old age is often said to begin at 65, which in our society (Nigerian reference) is a typical age of retirement. In some part of the world, where life expectancy is lower, a person might be old at 35 or 40. Even in our own society (i.e., Nigeria), we see enormous variation among older people. Neugarten [2], therefore, gave the reason for this variation that “old age” is quite a long period of time, encompassing many phases and changes. Hence, he has divided older individuals into three distinct groups as follows:(i)the young-old, those between 55 and 65, who are still working and at peak of their social and vocational status in life,(ii)the middle-old, those between 65 and 75, the majority of whom are retired and in good health and who have abundant time to follow their interest, and(iii)the old-old, those over age 75, who as a group are the frailest and poorest of the old. Family care has been one of the focal points in this study. Families have been the major resource, and until very recently their responsibility for relatives was enforced morally, culturally, and through law. For instance, relative responsibility laws held adult children responsible for the support of their parents. Today, if children could not take an older parent needing care
居住模式、居住距离与农村老年人主观福利的关系研究
Study on the Relationship of Living Pattern,Living Distance and Subjective Well-being of the Rural Elderly
 [PDF]

郑晓冬,方向明
- , 2018,
Abstract: 老年人居住模式与主观福利的关系是家庭研究中的重要问题。基于2013年中国健康与养老追踪调查(CHARLS)数据,以代际居住距离为切入点,考察“亲子同住”、“分而不离”以及“既分又离”等居住模式对农村老年人主观福利的影响差异,同时进行影响异质性及影响路径的讨论与检验。研究发现:代际居住距离与农村老年人抑郁程度呈正“U”型关系,与生活满意度呈倒“U”型关系,“分而不离”的居住模式对老年人主观福利状况更具优势,尤其是女性、年龄相对较低和有一定生活自理能力的老年人。从影响途径看,“分而不离”的居住模式主要通过增加子女的经济支持、改善代际关系以及提高老年人的社会活动参与水平,从而促进老年人的主观福利。其中,代际关系的改善是“分而不离”居住模式提升老年人主观福利水平的主要原因。
The relationship between living pattern and subjective well-being of the elderly is an important issue in family research.Based on the data of China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Survey (CHARLS) in 2013,this paper investigates the effect of living patterns such as “living with children”,“separating without leaving” and “separating and leaving” on the subjective well-being of the rural elderly and its heterogeneity and impact path.The results show that the relationship between intergenerational living distance and depressive degree and life satisfaction of rural elderly is positive “U” shape and inverted “U” shape respectively.The elderly has the highest level of subjective well-being when living in the same village but not together with their children,especially for the elderly who are women,relatively young and who have high-leveled self-care ability.From the perspective of the impact path,“separating without leaving” affects the subjective well-being of the rural elderly mainly by increasing the economic support from children,improving intergenerational relations and raising the participation level of the elderly in social activities.Among them,the improvement of intergenerational relations has the most significant impact on the subjective well-being of the rural elderly.
Living Arrangements of the Elderly in China and Their Depressions  [PDF]
Jie Xiong
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2018.64014
Abstract:
We study the living arrangements and consequences for depression of the elderly in China using data from the CHARLS in 2013 and 2015. It uses pooled regression and Two-way FE model to analyze the depression of elderly between different living arrangements. We study people in the sample age sixty and older, find that different living arrangements affect life depression of elderly, and compared to living with one or more grown children, elderly respondents living nearby grown children have least depression, especially in the same village or neighborhood. We believe that with the development and progress of society, elderly living with their children will not make the elderly more satisfied with their lives.
Determinants of Living Arrangements among the Chinese Elderly: New Evidence from the CLHLS 2011 Wave  [PDF]
Zhang Li
Chinese Studies (ChnStd) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/chnstd.2015.41006
Abstract: This research examines the determinants of living arrangements among the Chinese elderly by distinguishing the seniors by sex, residence and age. Through analyzing data from the 2011 wave of Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), the results show that about 80% of the elderly still chose to co-reside with other family members and only 2% of them lived in institutions. Having children nearby who visited frequently, high education, pension coverage and social integration generally decrease the odds of co-residing. Having activity of daily living (ADL) disabilities, higher household income, homeownership and preferring living with others increase the likelihood of co-residing. Currently married individuals, females and minorities are more likely to live with others. Co-residing also increases with age. However, the effects of the above factors on the subgroups’ living arrangements differ substantially. Male and urban residents’ living arrangement determinants are more similar, whereas female and rural residents’ co-residing determinants are more comparable. Age of 75 is found to be a bench mark differentiating living arrangement patterns and determinants for seniors. The study draws future research attention to developing separate models understanding the elderly subgroups’ living arrangements.
Living Arrangements and Lifestyle Satisfaction among the Elderly in Chinese Immigrant Families: A Preliminary Study.  [PDF]
Wei-Chiang Yeh
Chang Gung Medical Journal , 2003,
Abstract: Background: The aims of this preliminary study were to understand the relationshipbetween the living arrangements and lifestyle satisfaction through investigatinghow choices of living arrangements impacted upon lifestyle satisfactionof elderly Chinese immigrants in London.Methods: A qualitative research methodology with semi-structured, face-to-face andin-depth interviews was utilized with eight elderly couples of Chinese immigrantfamilies from Vietnam and Hong Kong.Results: The results indicated that the desirability of current lifestyle was associatedwith lifestyle satisfaction. Among 12 participants who desired their currentlifestyles, nine reported this having a "positive effect" on their lifestyle satisfaction,and no negative effects were reported. In comparison, the negativeeffects on lifestyle satisfaction were found among four participants who didnot desire their current independent residence from their adult children. Thereasons the participants desired or not their current lifestyles and the effectson their lifestyle satisfaction were explored qualitatively. The participantsmight consider family situations (finance, health, age, and kin network) tosome extent, but not see them as key determinants in making decisions aboutliving arrangements. However, the Chinese cultural beliefs in living arrangementchoices were highly visible in their reports.Conclusion: The findings suggested that the elderly participants' desirability of their currentlifestyles was positively associated with the level of lifestyle satisfaction.The issue of the living arrangements and lifestyle satisfaction of theelderly acquires new significance at a time when the population in Taiwan isaging, and the socio-economic and cultural changes are more radical thanever.
The Impact of Living Arrangements on Medical Services’ Utilization among the Elderly
—An Empirical Analysis Based on CHARLS2013
 [PDF]

Zuo Lin
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2018.65015
Abstract: Based on the second wave’s database of China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, this paper uses binary logistic regression to analyze the impact of the living arrangements on the medical services’ utilization among the elderly. The results show that: 1) The residential types have different influence on different medical services. 2) The number of cohabitants has a positive impact on the therapeutic medical services. 3) Living distance between the older people and their children also has opposite effect between the preventive and therapeutic medical services. In order to reduce the prevalence of the elderly and improve their health services utilization, offspring should pay more attention to the elderly’s life, providing more material and spiritual support.
Living Arrangements of Widowed Elderly Women and their Differentials: A Study in an Urban Setting of Tamil Nadu, India  [PDF]
Neelu Singh
Journal of Management and Science , 2012,
Abstract: Living arrangements in the twilight of life is a matter of primary concern for elderly widowedwomen. In view of this, an attempt is made to examine the effect of backgroundcharacteristics on the living arrangements of the widowed elderly women making use of thedata collected from 330 elderly widowed women from Coimbatore city, Tamil Nadu withfrequency and cross-tabular analyses as well as chi-square test of significance. The studyfound that slightly less than three-tenths of widowed women are old-old (75+ years). Onthe other hand, three-fifths of elderly belonged to most backward / backward caste andmajority (63%) of them illiterates. About two-fifths (42%) of the elderly widowed women areliving with married son. The differentials of elderly living alone vs with children are mostlyin expected direction and highly significant (p<0.001) with an increase in the number ofearning members in the family, number of children living in the same area / city as well asthose who belonged to the households of high standard of living. On the other hand, thepercentage of widowed elderly who live alone has shown a clear increasing pattern with anincrease in occupational status and instrumental activities of daily living scale. Further, it isnoticed that the elderly who are living alone is higher among those who are feeling unhealthy as compared to those elderly widowed women as healthy . All these percentagedifferentials are also turned out as significant at different levels of extent (p<0.001 or p<0.05).Based on these findings a few policy implications have been postulated.
Well-being dialogue: Elderly women's subjective sense of well-being from their course of life perspective
Ann-Marie Svensson,Lena B. M?rtensson,Ulla H. Hellstr?m Muhli
International Journal of Qualitative Studies on Health & Well-Being , 2012, DOI: 10.3402/qhw.v7i0.19207
Abstract: In this article, we are concerned with narratives of elderly women's well-being from their perspectives of the latter parts of their life, living at special housing accommodation (SHA) in the context of Swedish elderly care. In focusing on narratives about well-being, we have a two-fold focus: (1) how the elderly women create their own identity and meaning-making based on lifetime experience; and (2) how narratives of well-being are reflected through the filter of life in situ at the SHA.Based on empirical data consisting of well-being narratives, a dialogical performance analysis was undertaken. The results show how relationships with important persons during various stages of life, and being together and enjoying fellowship with other people as well as enjoying freedom and self-determination, are central aspects of well-being. The conclusions drawn are that the characteristic phenomena of well-being (the what) in the narratives are continuity, identity, and sociality for the elderly person, and this is manifested (the how) as a question of contrasting the state of self-management and self-decline.
Living Alone, Loneliness, and Psychological Well-Being of Older Persons in Singapore  [PDF]
Lena L. Lim,Ee-Heok Kua
Current Gerontology and Geriatrics Research , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/673181
Abstract: Studies of the psychological well-being of elderly living alone have yielded inconsistent results. Few investigators have distinguished living alone from loneliness in the same study. Thus, the present study examined the independent and interactive effects of living alone and loneliness on depressive symptoms (GDS score) and quality of life (SF-12 MCS score) in a prospective 2-year follow-up cohort study of 2808 community-dwelling older adults (aged ≥55 years) in Singapore, controlling for baseline covariates. In cross-sectional analysis, loneliness was a more robust predictor of GDS score than living arrangements; living alone, when controlled for loneliness, was not associated with GDS score. GDS score associated with living alone was worse for those who felt lonely than for those who did not feel lonely. Similar patterns of association were found in longitudinal analyses and for SF-12 MCS score, although not all were significant. Thus, though living alone predicted lower psychological well-being, its predictive ability was reduced when loneliness was taken into account and loneliness, a stronger predictor, worsened the psychological effects of living alone. 1. Introduction Population aging generates an array of social and health concerns, among which are the special concerns of the psychological well-being of elderly who live alone. Much research on the association between living arrangements and subjective well-being of the elderly has yielded inconsistent findings. Studies of various older populations in the United States, Hong Kong, Japan, and The Netherlands have reported that elderly living alone were more likely to be depressed [1–5] and have poorer mental health status and quality of life [2, 6, 7] than their counterparts. However, some authors reported that living alone was not associated with higher levels of depressive symptoms and lower quality of life [3, 8]. For instance, Kawamoto et al. [9] in their 2-year study also found that living alone was not a significant risk factor for emotional well-being in Japanese elderly after adjustment for conventional confounding factors such as age, sex, work activity status, and self-rated health. These discrepant findings may be explained by various reasons that include the selection characteristics and heterogeneity of the study populations, such as differing concentrations of the urban poor and indigent in different studies. An important factor is the effect of loneliness. Loneliness can be viewed as a subjective measure of one’s state of mind and the negative feelings about one’s level of social
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