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Living Arrangements and Subjective Well-Being among the Chinese Elderly  [PDF]
Li Zhang
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2015.33024
Abstract: This research examines how household context mediates with social participation and intergen-erational relations to impact subjective well-being among the elderly aged 65 and over in China. Through analyzing data from the 2011 wave of Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), the results show that living alone or in institutions links to negative well-being of the elderly. A higher level of social participation and better intergenerational relations promote positive well-being and reduce negative well-being. However, only social participation interacts with living arrangements when influencing the elderly’s subjective well-being. Specifically, a higher level of social integration significantly reduces negative well-being for individuals living in institutions. The findings call future research attention to explore factors that may reduce negative well-being of the elderly living alone or living in institutions.
Living Arrangements of the Elderly in China and Their Depressions  [PDF]
Jie Xiong
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2018.64014
Abstract:
We study the living arrangements and consequences for depression of the elderly in China using data from the CHARLS in 2013 and 2015. It uses pooled regression and Two-way FE model to analyze the depression of elderly between different living arrangements. We study people in the sample age sixty and older, find that different living arrangements affect life depression of elderly, and compared to living with one or more grown children, elderly respondents living nearby grown children have least depression, especially in the same village or neighborhood. We believe that with the development and progress of society, elderly living with their children will not make the elderly more satisfied with their lives.
Living Arrangements and Lifestyle Satisfaction among the Elderly in Chinese Immigrant Families: A Preliminary Study.  [PDF]
Wei-Chiang Yeh
Chang Gung Medical Journal , 2003,
Abstract: Background: The aims of this preliminary study were to understand the relationshipbetween the living arrangements and lifestyle satisfaction through investigatinghow choices of living arrangements impacted upon lifestyle satisfactionof elderly Chinese immigrants in London.Methods: A qualitative research methodology with semi-structured, face-to-face andin-depth interviews was utilized with eight elderly couples of Chinese immigrantfamilies from Vietnam and Hong Kong.Results: The results indicated that the desirability of current lifestyle was associatedwith lifestyle satisfaction. Among 12 participants who desired their currentlifestyles, nine reported this having a "positive effect" on their lifestyle satisfaction,and no negative effects were reported. In comparison, the negativeeffects on lifestyle satisfaction were found among four participants who didnot desire their current independent residence from their adult children. Thereasons the participants desired or not their current lifestyles and the effectson their lifestyle satisfaction were explored qualitatively. The participantsmight consider family situations (finance, health, age, and kin network) tosome extent, but not see them as key determinants in making decisions aboutliving arrangements. However, the Chinese cultural beliefs in living arrangementchoices were highly visible in their reports.Conclusion: The findings suggested that the elderly participants' desirability of their currentlifestyles was positively associated with the level of lifestyle satisfaction.The issue of the living arrangements and lifestyle satisfaction of theelderly acquires new significance at a time when the population in Taiwan isaging, and the socio-economic and cultural changes are more radical thanever.
The changing determinants of UK young adults' living arrangements  [cached]
Juliet Stone,Ann Berrington,Jane Falkingham
Demographic Research , 2011,
Abstract: The postponement of partnership formation and parenthood in the context of an early average age at leaving home has resulted in increased heterogeneity in the living arrangements of young adults in the UK. More young adults now remain in the parental home, or live independently of the parental home but outside of a family. The extent to which these trends are explained by the increased immigration of foreign-born young adults, the expansion in higher education, and the increased economic insecurity faced by young adults are examined. Shared non-family living is particularly prominent among those with experience of higher education, whilst labour market uncertainty is associated with an extended period of co-residence with parents.
The Health Differences and Influencing Factors of Elderly in Urban and Rural Areas: Based on Data of CLHLS 2014  [PDF]
Mengling He, Jian Zhou
Advances in Applied Sociology (AASoci) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/aasoci.2018.84016
Abstract: The health of the elderly has always been an important issue to China in recent years. Based on the 6729 samples of 2014 Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS), this paper focuses on the health differences among the elderly in urban and rural China. The results show that: the health status of urban and rural elderly in China has significant differences. The elderly in rural areas are healthier than urban. The health of the elderly is affected by many factors. Education, marriage, health insurance, quality of sleep, participation in social activities and exercise have a positive effect on the health of the elderly. Positive and optimistic older people are in better health. The health status of the elderly with children’s financial support is superior to that of the elderly without financial support. The health effects of caring for the elderly are the opposite of financial support.
Elderly care in daily living in rural Vietnam: Need and its socioeconomic determinants
Le V Hoi, Pham Thang, Lars Lindholm
BMC Geriatrics , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2318-11-81
Abstract: In 2007, people aged 60 years and older, living in 2,240 households, were randomly selected from the FilaBavi Demographic Surveillance System (DSS). They were interviewed using structured questionnaires to assess needed support in activities of daily living (ADLs). Individuals were interviewed about the presence of chronic illnesses that had been diagnosed by a physician. Participant socioeconomic characteristics were extracted from the FilaBavi repeat census. The repeat census used a repeat of the same survey methods and questions as the original FilaBavi DSS. Distributions of study participants by socioeconomic group, supports needed, levels of support received, types of caregivers, and the ADL index were described. Multivariate analyses were performed to identify socioeconomic determinants of the ADL index.The majority of older people do not need of support for each specific ADL item. Dependence in instrumental or intellectual ADLs was more common than for basic ADLs. People who need total help were less common than those who need some help in most ADLs. Over three-fifths of those who need help receive enough support in all ADL dimensions. Children and grandchildren are the main caregivers. Age group, sex, educational level, marital status, household membership, working status, household size, living arrangement, residential area, household wealth, poverty status, and chronic illnesses were determinants of daily care needs in old age.Although majority of older people who needed help received enough support in daily care, the need of care is more demanded in disadvantaged groups. Future community-based, long-term elderly care should focus on instrumental and intellectual ADLs among the general population of older people, and on basic ADLs among those with chronic illnesses. Socioeconomic determinants of care needs should be addressed in future interventions.A rapid aging trend, with declines in fertility and mortality, was observed in Vietnam during recent decades
The Impact of Living Arrangements on Medical Services’ Utilization among the Elderly
—An Empirical Analysis Based on CHARLS2013
 [PDF]

Zuo Lin
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2018, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2018.65015
Abstract: Based on the second wave’s database of China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study, this paper uses binary logistic regression to analyze the impact of the living arrangements on the medical services’ utilization among the elderly. The results show that: 1) The residential types have different influence on different medical services. 2) The number of cohabitants has a positive impact on the therapeutic medical services. 3) Living distance between the older people and their children also has opposite effect between the preventive and therapeutic medical services. In order to reduce the prevalence of the elderly and improve their health services utilization, offspring should pay more attention to the elderly’s life, providing more material and spiritual support.
Living Arrangements of Widowed Elderly Women and their Differentials: A Study in an Urban Setting of Tamil Nadu, India  [PDF]
Neelu Singh
Journal of Management and Science , 2012,
Abstract: Living arrangements in the twilight of life is a matter of primary concern for elderly widowedwomen. In view of this, an attempt is made to examine the effect of backgroundcharacteristics on the living arrangements of the widowed elderly women making use of thedata collected from 330 elderly widowed women from Coimbatore city, Tamil Nadu withfrequency and cross-tabular analyses as well as chi-square test of significance. The studyfound that slightly less than three-tenths of widowed women are old-old (75+ years). Onthe other hand, three-fifths of elderly belonged to most backward / backward caste andmajority (63%) of them illiterates. About two-fifths (42%) of the elderly widowed women areliving with married son. The differentials of elderly living alone vs with children are mostlyin expected direction and highly significant (p<0.001) with an increase in the number ofearning members in the family, number of children living in the same area / city as well asthose who belonged to the households of high standard of living. On the other hand, thepercentage of widowed elderly who live alone has shown a clear increasing pattern with anincrease in occupational status and instrumental activities of daily living scale. Further, it isnoticed that the elderly who are living alone is higher among those who are feeling unhealthy as compared to those elderly widowed women as healthy . All these percentagedifferentials are also turned out as significant at different levels of extent (p<0.001 or p<0.05).Based on these findings a few policy implications have been postulated.
Family Care, Social Services, and Living Arrangements Factors Influencing Psychosocial Well-Being of Elderly from Selected Households in Ibadan, Nigeria  [PDF]
D. Oladeji
Education Research International , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/421898
Abstract: This study examined family care, social services, and living arrangements factors influencing the psychosocial well-being of the elderly from selected households in Ibadan, Nigeria. The participants for the study consisted of 280 elderly persons randomly drawn from selected households in five local government areas of Ibadan metropolis. A descriptive survey design was employed in collecting the data from the respondents. Data collected were analyzed using chi-square (2) statistics. Results obtained indicated that significant relationships existed between family care (2=127.9, df = 12, <.05), social services (2=191.9, df = 12, <.05), and living arrangements (2=14.4, df = 6, <.05) and psychosocial well-being of elderly. The results implicate the need for the framework on the complex system of the elderly services. These areas of service include economic services, attitudes toward aging, roles played by the elderly, and health care services.
Family Care, Social Services, and Living Arrangements Factors Influencing Psychosocial Well-Being of Elderly from Selected Households in Ibadan, Nigeria  [PDF]
D. Oladeji
Education Research International , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/421898
Abstract: This study examined family care, social services, and living arrangements factors influencing the psychosocial well-being of the elderly from selected households in Ibadan, Nigeria. The participants for the study consisted of 280 elderly persons randomly drawn from selected households in five local government areas of Ibadan metropolis. A descriptive survey design was employed in collecting the data from the respondents. Data collected were analyzed using chi-square ( ) statistics. Results obtained indicated that significant relationships existed between family care ( , df = 12, ), social services ( , df = 12, ), and living arrangements ( , df = 6, ) and psychosocial well-being of elderly. The results implicate the need for the framework on the complex system of the elderly services. These areas of service include economic services, attitudes toward aging, roles played by the elderly, and health care services. 1. Introduction Aging is not an entirely negative process, but old age is undoubtedly a difficult period, worsened by the inadequacy of social institutions to care for the aged [1]. Some studies have found no differences among the young and the elderly on measures of satisfaction, morale, and general happiness, and some studies show that elderly have a more positive self-concept than the younger ones. Old age is often said to begin at 65, which in our society (Nigerian reference) is a typical age of retirement. In some part of the world, where life expectancy is lower, a person might be old at 35 or 40. Even in our own society (i.e., Nigeria), we see enormous variation among older people. Neugarten [2], therefore, gave the reason for this variation that “old age” is quite a long period of time, encompassing many phases and changes. Hence, he has divided older individuals into three distinct groups as follows:(i)the young-old, those between 55 and 65, who are still working and at peak of their social and vocational status in life,(ii)the middle-old, those between 65 and 75, the majority of whom are retired and in good health and who have abundant time to follow their interest, and(iii)the old-old, those over age 75, who as a group are the frailest and poorest of the old. Family care has been one of the focal points in this study. Families have been the major resource, and until very recently their responsibility for relatives was enforced morally, culturally, and through law. For instance, relative responsibility laws held adult children responsible for the support of their parents. Today, if children could not take an older parent needing care
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