oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Productivity Analysis of the Telecommunication Sector in India
Vineeta Saxena (Nigam),Dr. Tripta Thakur,Dr. R.P.Singh
International Journal of Engineering and Technology , 2009,
Abstract: This paper applies the data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach to measure the Productivity performance of India’s telecommunications sector. This study applies a data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach to measure the magnitude of performance differences between leading telecom operators in terms of their marketability and Profitability. It compares the financial valuations and relative productivity efficiencies of the leading global telecoms. Empirical results indicate that none of the telecoms with high valuations are highly efficient in terms of DEA, and that wireless operators are more efficient than full-service telecoms in terms of profitability and marketability. The results are expected to be utilized as benchmarking strategies for wireless and full-service telecommunications to be equipped with competitive advantages.
Impacts of Poor Productivity on Profitability-A Comparative Analysis on Selected Public and Private Sector Manufacturing Enterprises in Bangladesh
Begum Ismat Ara Huq
Pakistan Journal of Social Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: The study examines the impacts of poor productivity in 05 public sector and 05 private sector manufacturing enterprises in Bangladesh. The study reveals that direct material productivity, labor productivity per worker, capital productivity and total productivity had been 4 to 5 times higher in the private sector samples than those in the public sector samples during the study period. Whereas, labor productivity per Taka of direct wages was almost same in both the public sector and private sector samples. On the other hand, material total productivity had been higher in the public sector samples as compared to the private sector samples. Total productivity had been more or less satisfactory in all the private sector samples and in three out of five public sector samples. But, the same in the remaining two public sector samples had been poor and hence unsatisfactory. Labor productivity, capital productivity and total productivity had direct positive correlation with the profitability, measured in terms of profit margin, return on capital employed, return on investment and earning per hundred Taka share. Therefore, in order to improve existing profitability of the samples; it is essential to increase their productivity. To this end, the factors responsible for poor productivity as identified by the respondents must be removed without any further delay. For the purpose, the suggestions put forward by the respondents need to be implemented by the concerned authority.
Productivity Growth in Some Energy Intensive Manufacturing Industries in India : An analytical Assessment
Sarbapriya Ray
International Journal of Economics and Financial Issues , 2012,
Abstract: This paper estimates productivity performance of India’s energy intensive industries in terms of total factor productivity growth for the entire period, 1979-80 to 2003-04. The productivity performance has been judged in view of translog indices under three input framework-material, labour and capital and a model has been evolved for assessing energy intensity in those industries. The result on the overall productivity shows declining total factor productivity growth during post-reform period as compared to pre-reform period. Total output growth in India’s energy intensive an industry is found to be mainly input-driven rather than productivity-driven. The liberalization process is found to have its adverse impact on total factor productivity growth.
Inter-Industry Productivity Spillovers from Japanese and US FDI in Mexico’s Manufacturing Sector  [PDF]
Leo Guzmán Anaya
Technology and Investment (TI) , 2013, DOI: 10.4236/ti.2013.44028
Abstract:

Foreign Direct Investment can have positive effects on host countries by generating spillovers to domestic firms and contributing to increases in their productivity. These productivity spillovers1 can take place within an industry (intraindustry spillovers) and across industries (inter-industry spillovers) as in the case of technology or knowledge transfer to domestic suppliers (backward productivity spillovers) or customers (forward productivity spillovers). Using unpublished economic census data from Mexico’s manufacturing sector this study differs from others by comparing interindustry productivity spillovers from Japanese and US FDI. Results show that Japanese FDI increases the productivity of upstream sectors; however these gains seem to be shared only among foreign suppliers, while US FDI does not seem to generate backward productivity spillovers. Results show no presence of forward productivity spillovers.

malat Sekt ründe Verimlilik ve Reel ücret li kisi: Bir Koentegrasyon Analizi(Productivity and Real Wage Relationship in Manufacturing Sector: A Cointegration Analysis)
?ahabettin GüNE?
Y?netim ve Ekonomi , 2007,
Abstract: The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between labor productivity and real wages in Turkish manufacturing sector. Cointegration analysis has been used in order to see the existence of long-run relationship between these two series. For short-run dynamics a vector error correction model (VECM) has been utilized. Impulse response functions have also been calculated to evaluate the behavior of the variables rigorously. The results primarly suggest that there is a long-run equilibrium relationship between labor productivity and real wages in the manufacturing sector.
Procyclical Productivity in Manufacturing
NAVARRO,LUCAS; SOTO,RAIMUNDO;
Cuadernos de economía , 2006, DOI: 10.4067/S0717-68212006000100007
Abstract: we study the cyclical behavior of labor productivity in eighty industries of the chilean manufacturing sector in the 1979-2001 period. we find that labor productivity at the sector-level is procyclical but it is a-cyclical when using aggregate data. we provide an analytical and empirical explanation for this divergence. we also use an econometric model to quantify the determinants of productivity. the results indicate that technology shocks account for one half of productivity growth, thus supporting the supply shocks hypothesis as the main source of business cycles in chile. the other 50% of the productivity changes is explained by reallocation of resources from less to more productive sectors as well as the presence of increasing returns. variations in factor utilization were insignificant
Procyclical Productivity in Manufacturing  [cached]
LUCAS NAVARRO,RAIMUNDO SOTO
Cuadernos de Economía , 2006,
Abstract: We study the cyclical behavior of labor productivity in eighty industries of the Chilean manufacturing sector in the 1979-2001 period. We find that labor productivity at the sector-level is procyclical but it is a-cyclical when using aggregate data. We provide an analytical and empirical explanation for this divergence. We also use an econometric model to quantify the determinants of productivity. The results indicate that technology shocks account for one half of productivity growth, thus supporting the supply shocks hypothesis as the main source of business cycles in Chile. The other 50% of the productivity changes is explained by reallocation of resources from less to more productive sectors as well as the presence of increasing returns. Variations in factor utilization were insignificant
Total Factor Productivity in the Manufacturing Sector of Peru: 2002-2007 Productividad Total Factorial en el sector manufacturero del Perú: 2002-2007  [cached]
Mario D, Tello
Revista Economía , 2012,
Abstract: Based upon manufacturing sector data, this paper estimates the total factor productivity (TFP) for this sector with parametric and modern methods for the 2002-2007 period. Subject to data limitations and methods used, the estimations indicate that the TFP growth rate for a representative sample of up to 578 firms was low in the period analysed, without having contributed to the growth of manufacturing firms’ real production value. In addition, the TFP growth rate was greater for large firms (more than 100 employees) than for medium and small firms (less than 21 employees). In terms of industrial sectors, TFP growth rates were higher for primary processing and technology-intensive industries than for traditional industries (such as textiles, clothing and footwear), and the foodstuffs, tobacco, and beverages sectors. Lastly, though capital, employmentand installed capacity growth may explain the growth of manufacturing real output value for the period 2002-2007, the absence of TFP growth may jeopardize the sustainability of such a growth in the medium and long run. Basado en datos a nivel de empresa del sector manufacturero, este trabajo estima, con métodos paramétricos modernos, el nivel y la tasa de crecimiento de la productividad total factorial en dicho sector en el período 2002-2007. Sujeto a las limitaciones de información y métodos usados, y para una muestra representativa de hasta 578 empresas, las estimaciones indican que la tasa de crecimiento de la PTF ha sido baja y no ha contribuido al crecimiento del valor real deproducción de las firmas manufactureras en el período analizado. De otro lado, para una muestra de 578 empresas, el nivel y la tasa de variación promedio anual de la PTF de las empresas grandes(de más de 100 trabajadores) fue mayor que las respectivas magnitudes de las firmas peque as(menores a 21 trabajadores). En términos de ramas productivas, las de procesamiento de minerales y otros productos primarios, y las intensivas en tecnología, tuvieron mayores tasas de crecimiento de la PTF en este período que las ramas tradicionales (tales como textiles, ropa y calzado) y las de alimentos, bebidas y tabaco, las cuales decrecieron sus respectivas PTF. Por último, si bien el crecimiento del capital, empleo y la capacidad instalada dan cuenta del crecimiento del producto manufacturero, la ausencia de cambios significativos en la PFT de las firmas puede limitar en el mediano y largo plazo la sostenibilidad de dicho crecimiento.
The Effect of Foreign Direct Investment on the Nigerian Manufacturing Sector  [cached]
Opaluwa David,Ameh. A. Abu,Alabi J. O.,Abdul Mohammed
International Business and Management , 2012, DOI: 10.3968/j.ibm.1923842820120402.1075
Abstract: This study examined the effect of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) on the Nigerian manufacturing sector spanning 1975 – 2008. Nigeria has embarked on several policy measures aimed at enhancing the manufacturing sector’s productivity coupled with the inflow of FDI to the country. The controversy is that the policy makers are not convinced that the potential benefits of FDI could be fully realized. The methodology adopted for the study is the Vector Auto Regression (VAR), co-integration and error correction techniques to establish the relationship between FDI and the growth of manufacturing sector. The findings from the study show that FDI has a negative effect on the manufacturing productivity and is statistically significant. Arising from the findings, it is recommended that government should create an enabling environment for foreign investment and the monitoring of FDI benefits, with particular focus of NEPAD and NEEDS through the instrumentality of the MDGs; thereby mustering the capacity for sustainable growth in the manufacturing sector. Key words: FDI; Manufacturing sector; Productivity; Growth, Policy
International Comparison of Labor Productivity Distribution for Manufacturing and Non-Manufacturing Firms  [PDF]
Yuichi Ikeda,Wataru Souma
Physics , 2008, DOI: 10.1143/PTPS.179.93
Abstract: Labor productivity was studied at the microscopic level in terms of distributions based on individual firm financial data from Japan and the US. A power-law distribution in terms of firms and sector productivity was found in both countries' data. The labor productivities were not equal for nation and sectors, in contrast to the prevailing view in the field of economics. It was found that the low productivity of the Japanese non-manufacturing sector reported in macro-economic studies was due to the low productivity of small firms.
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.