oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Copper and Zinc Contents in Urban Agricultural Soils of Niger State, Nigeria
YA Iyaka, SE Kakulu
African Research Review , 2009,
Abstract: Study of the Cu and Zn contents in urban agricultural soils is paramount in order to assess concerning the possible potential risks they may pose at high concentrations to life and environment through the food chain. Levels of Cu and Zn in soil samples collected from cultivated farmlands in the vicinity of abandoned industrial sites at two cities of Minna and Bida in Niger State, were determined using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. The concentrations were in the following ranges; 12-89mgCukg-1 and 2.8-41mgZnkg-1 for Minna and 2.4-6.5mgCukg-1 and 0.57-36mgZnkg-1 for Bida. The accumulation of Cu in Minna cultivated farmlands was apparent, with a mean Cu content of 24 + 22ppm, which was almost five times that of the control soils, but other mean values were similar to the soil background average contents. Soil properties were also analysed, and obtained results for the cultivated farmland soils of the two cities were of the following ranges: - pH (5.0-7.5), Organic carbon (0.36-2.5)%, sand (46.4- 94.2)%, silt (2.3-20.0)% and clay (1.8-33.6)%. Cu and Zn positively correlated among themselves, Cu correlated with clay content and Zn correlated with pH and organic carbon in all the soils.
Greening the judiciary
M Kidd
Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal/Potchefstroomse Elektroniese Regsblad , 2006,
Abstract: Much of South Africa’s environmental law is relatively new. Most of South Africa’s judges received their formal legal educations before promulgation of the major part of our environmental law and almost certainly before environmental law was taught at universities. In recent years, there have been increasing instances of cases involving environmental matters coming to the courts. How are judges performing in these cases? It would appear that the judges’ performance is rather 'chequered' in environmental cases, which suggests that the judiciary needs to become more attuned to environmental law. I call this process, for purposes of this note, ‘greening the judiciary’. What I mean by this is not that judges must decide all environmental cases in a way that favours the environment, but that they must correctly consider, interpret and apply the relevant environmental law, and give environmental considerations appropriate deliberation. This note aims to identify, in admittedly somewhat general terms, the current state of environmental decision-making by judges and to suggest what needs to happen for such decisions to be improved.
Greening the Judiciary
M Kidd
Potchefstroom Electronic Law Journal/Potchefstroomse Elektroniese Regsblad , 2006,
Abstract: Much of South Africa’s environmental law is relatively new. Most of South Africa’s judges received their formal legal educations before promulgation of the major part of our environmental law and almost certainly before environmental law was taught at universities. In recent years, there have been increasing instances of cases involving environmental matters coming to the courts. How are judges performing in these cases? It would appear that the judges’ performance is rather 'chequered' in environmental cases, which suggests that the judiciary needs to become more attuned to environmental law. I call this process, for purposes of this note, ‘greening the judiciary’. What I mean by this is not that judges must decide all environmental cases in a way that favours the environment, but that they must correctly consider, interpret and apply the relevant environmental law, and give environmental considerations appropriate deliberation. This note aims to identify, in admittedly somewhat general terms, the current state of environmental decision-making by judges and to suggest what needs to happen for such decisions to be improved.
Distribution of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in rural agricultural wetland soils of the Niger Delta Region
PO Oviasogie, EE Ukpebor, U Omoti
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2006,
Abstract: The concentration and distribution of 17 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in some rural agricultural wetland soils of the Niger delta region, Nigeria was determined. There were measurable amounts of naphthalene, acenaphthalene, acenaphthene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene, chrysene and benzo(b)fluoranthene. Benzo(a)pyrene, benzo(k)fluoranthene, indeno(1,2,3)perylene, dibenzo(a,h)anthracene and benzo(g,h,i)perylene were not detected in the soils. There were also significant correlations between the occurrences of some of the PAHs. However, the concentrations of the PAHs obtained were within the background levels expected for rural agricultural soils. The PAHs levels obtained in this study would act as baseline levels of these persistent organic pollutants in this environment with about 50 abandoned oil wells that are now been reactivated for completion and production.
Assessing the Effectiveness of Land farming in the Remediation of Hydrocarbon Polluted Soils in the Niger Delta, Nigeria
Mmom Prince Chinedu,T. Deekor
Research Journal of Applied Sciences, Engineering and Technology , 2010,
Abstract: Hydrocarbons pollution of soils has constituted environmental issues over the years. The biggest concern associated w ith hydrocarbon pollution in the environment is the risk to farmlands, fisheries and potable water supplies contamination. Several remediation techniques exist (Bioremediation and Non-bioremediation), which aim at reducing the hydrocarbon content of the polluted soil and water with their varying degrees of success. Thus land farming, one of the bioremediation remediation techniques is view ed as a more viable remediation options for hydrocarbon polluted soils. The study therefore was instituted to assess the effectiveness of land farming (Enhanced Natural Attenuation) in the remediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites in the Niger Delta. Soil samples from ten (10) sites polluted and remediated sites in the Niger Delta; that is five (5) samples each from the swampy and well drained sites and subjected to Laboratory analysis. The results were further analysed using both descriptive and inferential statistical tools of percentages, regression analysis and student t-test. The results of the soil analysis show 14.54 to 82.24% and 16.01 to 50.54% reductions in the TPH and PAH concentrations after land farming respectively. This shows high level of efficacy in the use of the Land farming as remediation technique. However, the efficacy varied between the swampy and well drained soils; reductions in the hydrocarbon levels of the soils in the water-logged or swamp areas were lower and slower than that of the well drained soils. This shows that the soil microbes were able to degrade the hydrocarbons faster in the well-drained soil probably because of the favourable soil conditions like pH, moisture, and nutrient. To ameliorate this problem, more effective way of bio-remediation for swamp area should be pursued like phyto-remediation; this is the use of higher plants to enhance the remediation of soils contaminated with recalcitrant organic compounds.
Heavy Metal Concentrations in Top Agricultural Soils around Ceramic and Pharmaceutical Industrial Sites in Niger State, Nigeria
Y.A. Iyaka,S.E. Kakulu
Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences , 2012,
Abstract: Lead, copper, nickel and zinc contents in agricultural soils within the vicinity of ceramic and pharmaceutical industrial sites in Niger State, Nigeria were determined using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry technique. Mean contents for all sample locations of the two industrial sites were 18±7.5, 15±5.7, 1.9±0.96 and 28±22 mg/kg for lead, copper, nickel and zinc, respectively. The obtained values were of higher contents than the background levels measured in control soil samples, thereby showing that studied heavy metals are mainly accounted for by anthropogenic activities, although nickel was less apparent. The findings of this study have also revealed the need for more constant monitoring of heavy metal concentrations in soils from the vicinity of industrial sites in developing nations in order to assess their possible potential hazard to life and environment.
Basic Engineering Geological Properties of Lateritic Soils from Western Niger Delta
F.C. Ugbe
Research Journal of Environmental and Earth Sciences , 2011,
Abstract: This study was carried out with aim of providing a valuable data base for emerging road construction engineers involved in opening up the rural areas for extensive petroleum exploration activities. A total of 152 samples were randomly collected with different geotechnical parameters tested according to the British Standards. The soils are generally fine to medium grained consisting mainly of clayey sand and sandy clays with low to medium plasticity. The mean value of the optimum moisture content of less than 12% suggests that during dry season, construction work in the field may not be a major problem. The soaked CBR values range from 3 to 43%. This falls below the stipulated 180% by Federal Ministry of Works for base course material. Consequently, this suggests that these soils should be subjected to some forms of stabilization to ensure the durability of roads in this region.
Fractional Recovery of Applied Phosphorus in Soils of Akwa Ibom State, Niger Delta Region of Nigeria
T.O. Ibia,E.J. Udo,J.A.I. Omueti
Environmental Research Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Seven surface soil samples, representing the dominant soil parent materials in Akwa Ibom State, Niger Delta Region of Nigeria were treated to various concentration levels of P and the amounts of P measured at time intervals of 1, 10, 50 and 150 days. The phosphorus fixing capacity of the soils increased with increasing rate of added P and time of equilibration. At 1 day, P fixation capacities estimated by fractional recovery varied from 26-66% and at 150 days observation it ranged from 37-76%, respectively for soils of sandstone and beach sands origin. The amount of P required to increase the value of Bray P-1 by 1 mg L-1 (Fertilizer factor) at 150 days ranged from 2.6-5.3 mg L-1 with a corresponding mean of 3.9 mg L-1. The fertilizer factor appears to provide a useful index of obtaining the P fertilizer needs of the soil, however, calibration and correlation studies in a wide range of soils could further the usefulness of this approach.
The Regional Climate Effects of Replacing Farmland and Re-greening the Desertification Lands with Forest or Grass in West China
中国西部退耕还林(草)和沙漠化土地绿化的区域性气候效应

SHI Weilai,WANG Hanjie,
SHI Weilai
,WANG Hanjie

大气科学进展 , 2003,
Abstract: The West Development Policy being implemented in China causes significant land use and land cover(LULC) changes in West China, of which the two most important types of LULC change are replacingfarmland and re-greening the desertification land with forest or grass. This paper modifies the prevailingregional climate model (RCM) by updating its lower boundary conditions with the up-to-date satellitedatabase of the Global Land Cover Characteristics Database (GLCCD) created by the United StatesGeological Survey and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln. The modified RCM is used to simulate thepossible regional climate changes due to the LULC variations. The preliminary results can be summarizedas that the two main types of LULC variation, replacing farmland and greening the desertification landswith forest or grass in west China, will affect the regional climate mostly in northwest and north China,where the surface temperature will decrease and the precipitation will increase. The regional climateadjustments in South, Southwest China and on the Tibet Plateau are uncertain.
Management of fish ponds built on acid sulfate soils in Buguma creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria
C.O. DUBLIN-GREEN, A.O. AYINLA, T.K. OGORI
Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management , 2003,
Abstract: An experiment on the use of tidal flushing as a management technique for fishponds constructed in mangrove swamp of the Niger delta was carried out at the NIOMR/ARAC brackish water fish farm, Buguma, rivers state, Nigeria. The soils are highly acidic. pH in the wet state ranged between 6.75 and 7.70 but on air-drying, values went down to as low as 3.1. The soil acidifies the overlying pond water rapidly to ph less than 4.0 but upon tidal flushing the acidity was reduced remarkably with ph increasing to 7.1. The experiment revealed the effectiveness of tidal flushing in improving pond water quality and fish yield in brackish water ponds to about 1.25mt/ha/yr. Journal of Applied Sciences and Environmental Management Vol. 7(2) 2003: 39-43
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.