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The buffalypso: the water buffalo of Trinidad and Tobago  [cached]
S. P. Bennet,G. W. Garcia,P. Lampkin
Italian Journal of Animal Science , 2010, DOI: 10.4081/ijas.2007.s2.179
Abstract: E.E. Mac Lachlan, M.R.C.V.S. in 1952 brought to the attention of the Trinidad Veterinarians that the Water Buffalo was an important animal for the Caribbean and the hot humid Tropics. In 1949 Dr Steve Bennett, DVM, Colorado, began with Mr. T. Hume Porteous the development of the Buffalypso breed for beef production in Trinidad at the Caroni Limited Sugar Company. The paper describes the development of the Buffalypso [Buffalo from Trinidad the land of the Calypso- Buffa-lypso] and highlights its traits.
Crime in Trinidad and Tobago: the effect of alcohol use and unemployment
Maharajh,Hari D.; Ali,Akleema;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 2004, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49892004000600007
Abstract: objective: the purpose of this study was to determine whether unemployment and alcohol consumption were associated with different types of crime in trinidad and tobago. methods: this study made use of secondary data from the central statistical office of trinidad and tobago for the period 1990-1997. pearson product moment correlations and stepwise multiple regression analysis were used to identify significant predictors of crime. results: unemployment accounted for 69.2% of the variance for serious crimes. beer available for home consumption explained 64% of the variance for minor offenses, and both unemployment and beer available for home consumption accounted for 92.2% of the variance for minor crimes. conclusions: this study provides information that is potentially useful for developing public policies for unemployment and for the sale of beer for home consumption, both of which are associated with crime in trinidad and tobago. reductions in beer available for home consumption-a major public health concern-would significantly reduce the occurrence of minor offenses in this country. further research is needed on the relationship between unemployment and crime.
CIT in developing countries: The case of Trinidad and Tobago  [PDF]
Baji?-Brkovi? Milica
Spatium , 2005, DOI: 10.2298/spat0512032b
Abstract: Trinidad and Tobago is faced with the challenge of developing strategies to integrate successfully in the new knowledge economy. Many governmental actions towards "wiring" the nation are currently taking place. Creation of the "intelligent nation" is among country's national development objectives. Vis-a-vis plans yet to be designed and implemented over the next ten years there is a reality of the www option that has gained a momentum, and is already playing an important role in Trinidad and Tobago. While during the first years the www has been accepted as a medium for communicating and sharing information, today it has moved onto the next generation transforming into the development supporting tool. The experience of Trinidad and Tobago in using the CIT-based alternative is the focus of this paper. It explores the state of the art in the field, and discusses the way the alternative has been utilized so far in the country's development and management practice. It also identifies the potentials for further development, and suggests a number of proposals for future strategies and actions.
Contesting the Past: Narratives of Trinidad & Tobago history
Bridget Brereton
New West Indian Guide , 2008,
Abstract: Discusses the national narratives developed historically in Trinidad and Tobago. Author describes how the past has been interpreted differently, for different purposes, and by different ethnic groups. She first pays attention to 2 hegemonic historical narratives during the colonial era: the British imperial historical narrative and the French Creole one, associated with political and/or planter elites. Next, she discusses how since the mid-20th c. the anticolonial, nationalist movement responded to this, including academics, resulting in the Eric Williams-led Afro-Creole narrative, dominant in the decades since the 1961 independence, connecting Trinidad as a nation with African-descended Creoles. Further, she highlights challenges to the dominant Afro-Creole narrative, mainly since the 1970s, emerging partly in the domain of "public history", and mostly ethnicity-based. She discusses the politics of (Amerindian) indigeneity in Trinidad, the Tobago narrative, related to its distinct history, the Afrocentric narrative, and the Indocentric narrative, the latter including a more recent extreme Hinducentric narrative. Author points out that the Afro-Creole master narrative, and subsequent (ethnic) counternarratives eclipsed (at least academically) increasing class-based, or gendered historical narratives.
Same-visit HIV testing in Trinidad and Tobago
Violet Duke, Sheila Samiel, David Musa, Cameile Ali, Catherine Chang-Kit, Cynthia Warner
BMC Public Health , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-10-185
Abstract: Under the technical guidance of CAREC and CDC, the Ministry organized a technical working group which included representatives from key national HIV program services and technical assistance partners. This working group reviewed internationally-recognized best practices for HIV rapid testing and proposed a program that could be integrated into the national HIV programs of Trinidad and Tobago. The working group wrote a consensus protocol, defined certification criteria, prepared training materials and oversaw implementation of "same-visit" HIV testing at two pilot sites.A Ministry-of-Health-supported program of "same-visit" HIV testing has been established in Trinidad and Tobago. This program provides confidential testing that is independent of laboratory confirmation. The program allows clients who want to know their HIV status to obtain this information during a single-visit to a testing location. Testers who are certified to provide testing on behalf of the Ministry are also counselors. Non-laboratory personnel have been trained to provide HIV testing in non-laboratory locations. The program includes procedures to assure uniform quality of testing across multiple testing sites. Several procedural and training documents were developed during implementation of this program. This report contains links to those documents.The Ministry of Health has implemented a program of "same-visit" HIV testing in Trinidad and Tobago. This program provides clients confidential HIV test reports during a single visit to a testing location. The program is staffed by non-laboratory personnel who are trained to provide both testing and counseling in decentralized (non-laboratory) settings. This approach may serve as a model for other small countries.In 1981, the index case for what is now known as Acquired Immuno-deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was reported [1]. Within a few years, the Human Immuno-deficiency Virus (HIV) had been identified as the infectious agent that causes AIDS [2]. The la
Use of medicinal plants for diabetes in Trinidad and Tobago
Mahabir,D.; Gulliford,M. C.;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 1997, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49891997000300002
Abstract: use of herbal remedies from medicinal plants (bush medicines) was studied in 622 people with diabetes mellitus attending 17 government health centers on the island of trinidad, trinidad and tobago. bush medicines were used by 42% of patients surveyed and were used for diabetes by 24%. bush medicine use was more frequent in afro-trinidadians and in those of mixed ethnicity than in indo-trinidadians, and was also more prevalent in those with lower educational attainment. most patients using bush medicines (214/264, or 81%) reported gathering the plants themselves, and 107/264 (41%) took them more frequently than once a week. patients taking bush medicines mentioned 103 different plants used in remedies. among the 12 most frequently mentioned, caraili, aloes, olive-bush, and seed-under-leaf were preferentially used for diabetes. vervine, chandilay, soursop, fever grass, and orange peel were preferentially used for other indications. patients who reported burning or numbness in the feet or feelings of tiredness, weakness, giddiness, or dizziness used bush medicines for diabetes more frequently than did patients who reported a range of other diabetes-related symptoms. insulin-treated patients were less frequent users of bush medicines. it is concluded that bush medicines are taken regularly by many patients with diabetes in trinidad. plants most frequently used as remedies for diabetes have recognized hypoglycemic activity. patients' culture, educational background, type of symptoms, and formal medical treatment may also influence the selection and use of bush medicines.
Use of medicinal plants for diabetes in Trinidad and Tobago  [cached]
Mahabir D.,Gulliford M. C.
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 1997,
Abstract: Use of herbal remedies from medicinal plants (bush medicines) was studied in 622 people with diabetes mellitus attending 17 government health centers on the island of Trinidad, Trinidad and Tobago. Bush medicines were used by 42% of patients surveyed and were used for diabetes by 24%. Bush medicine use was more frequent in Afro-Trinidadians and in those of mixed ethnicity than in Indo-Trinidadians, and was also more prevalent in those with lower educational attainment. Most patients using bush medicines (214/264, or 81%) reported gathering the plants themselves, and 107/264 (41%) took them more frequently than once a week. Patients taking bush medicines mentioned 103 different plants used in remedies. Among the 12 most frequently mentioned, caraili, aloes, olive-bush, and seed-under-leaf were preferentially used for diabetes. Vervine, chandilay, soursop, fever grass, and orange peel were preferentially used for other indications. Patients who reported burning or numbness in the feet or feelings of tiredness, weakness, giddiness, or dizziness used bush medicines for diabetes more frequently than did patients who reported a range of other diabetes-related symptoms. Insulin-treated patients were less frequent users of bush medicines. It is concluded that bush medicines are taken regularly by many patients with diabetes in Trinidad. Plants most frequently used as remedies for diabetes have recognized hypoglycemic activity. Patients' culture, educational background, type of symptoms, and formal medical treatment may also influence the selection and use of bush medicines.
Novo registro e novas espécies de Cerambycinae (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae) de Trinidad and Tobago e da Venezuela
Martins, Ubirajara R.;Galileo, Maria Helena M.;
Revista Brasileira de Entomologia , 2010, DOI: 10.1590/S0085-56262010000400005
Abstract: new species described from trinidad and tobago: plocaederus dozieri sp. nov. (cerambycini, cerambycina), anelaphus trinidadensis sp. nov. (elaphidionini), piezocera rufula sp. nov. (piezocerini), assycuera marcelae sp. nov. and ceralocyna venusta sp. nov. (trachyderini, ancylocerina). neocompsa pallida sp. nov. (ibidionini) is described from trinidad and tobago and venezuela. ommata (o.) gallardi pe?aherrera & tavakilian, 2004 (rhinotragini), originally described from french guiana, is recorded for trinidad and tobago.
The Way Forward for Deepwater and Ultra Deepwater Drilling in Trinidad and Tobago  [cached]
Jerome Rajnauth
Advances in Petroleum Exploration and Development , 2012, DOI: 10.3968/j.aped.1925543820120401.735
Abstract: Future deepwater drilling in Trinidad and Tobago will definitely present enormous challenges. During the period 1999 to 2003, eight deepwater wells were drilled in deepwater acreage. None of these wells found hydrocarbon in economic quantities although abundant reserves have been found in the shelf area (<1000 meters water depth). The data from these wells would be useful for further deepwater and ultra deepwater drilling in Trinidad. To date, no wells have been drilled in our ultra deepwater acreage but seismic acquisition and processing has been undertaken. Thus lessons learned from the first deepwater campaign will definitely propel the way forward for further exploration works in deeper waters. We have to adapt our operations to accommodate the problems associated with our first phase of deepwater drilling in our area.This paper will look at the approaches we should adapt in the next phase of deepwater drilling. Some of these issues include rig selection, well location, well design and planning, environmental studies (wind, wave, climate etc.) and shallow hazard assessment. The key learnings from previous deepwater drilling events are useful in future operation in Trinidad and Tobago. Key words: Deepwater drilling; Trinidad and Tobago
Stroke in Trinidad and Tobago: burden of illness and risk factors
Mahabir,Deepak; Bickram,Lydia; Gulliford,Martin C.;
Revista Panamericana de Salud Pública , 1998, DOI: 10.1590/S1020-49891998001000002
Abstract: this study describes the burden of stroke on hospital services in a caribbean community. the settings are the two main acute general hospitals in trinidad observed over a 12-month period. all subjects were admitted with a clinical diagnosis of acute stroke. the measures were hospital admission rates, length of hospital stay, case-fatality rates, disability at discharge, and risk factors for stroke. there were 1 105 hospital admissions with a diagnosis of stroke. the median length of stay was 4 days, with an interquartile range of 2 to 9, and stroke accounted for approximately 9 478 bed days per annum. the hospital admission fatality rate was 29%. among surviving patients, 437 (56%) were severely disabled at discharge. age-standardized admission rates for first strokes in persons aged 35_64 years were 114 (95%ci: 83 to 145) per 100 000 in afro-trinidadian men and 144 (109 to 179) in indo-trinidadian men. the equivalent rates for women were 115 (84 to 146) and 152 (118 to 186). among patients with first strokes, 348/531 (66%) reported physician-diagnosed hypertension, but only 226 (65%) of these reported being on antihypertensives at admission. stroke in trinidad and tobago is associated with a high case-fatality rate and severe disability in survivors. modifiable risk factors were reported in a majority of stroke cases, and there is a need to develop effective preventive strategies.
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