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Potential Celiac Patients: A Model of Celiac Disease Pathogenesis  [PDF]
Maria Pia Sperandeo,Antonella Tosco,Valentina Izzo,Francesca Tucci,Riccardo Troncone,Renata Auricchio,Jihane Romanos,Gosia Trynka,Salvatore Auricchio,Bana Jabri,Luigi Greco
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0021281
Abstract: Potential celiacs have the ‘celiac type’ HLA, positive anti-transglutaminase antibodies but no damage at small intestinal mucosa. Only a minority of them develops mucosal lesion. More than 40 genes were associated to Celiac Disease (CD) but we still do not know how those pathways transform a genetically predisposed individual into an affected person. The aim of the study is to explore the genetic features of Potential CD individuals.
Recent advances in celiac disease  [cached]
Hugh James Freeman,Angeli Chopra,Michael Tom Clandinin,Alan BR Thomson
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2011, DOI: 10.3748/wjg.v17.i18.2259
Abstract: Celiac disease now affects about one person in a hundred in Europe and North America. In this review, we consider a number of important and exciting recent developments, such as clinical associations, HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 predispositions, the concept of potential celiac disease, the use of new imaging/endoscopy techniques, and the development of refractory disease. This review will be of use to all internists, pediatricians and gastroenterologists.
Celiac Disease  [PDF]
Nikolaos Fotos,Hero Brokalaki
To Vima tou Asklipiou , 2008,
Abstract: Celiac disease is a small intestine disease caused by the immunological response to gluten, a component of wheat, rye and barley. The worldwide prevalence of celiac disease ranges between 0.2% and 2.2 %. The clinical features of celiac disease includes diarrhea, steatorrhea, flatulence, abdominal pain and weight loss. The asymptomatic type of celiac disease is characterized by soft or normally shaped stool, weakness, lassitude and moderate weight loss. In children, celiac disease usually arises between the first and the third year of age, with diarrhea, flatulence and low weight. The malabsorption in small intestine causes many extaintestinal manifestations, such us anemia, bone abnormalities, hemorrhage and neuropathy. Celiac disease is diagnosed by histological examination of tissue samples taken by duodenum due gastroscopy and by the detection of certain antibodies in blood (anti-GL-IgG, anti-GL-IgA, ΕΜΑ-IgA και anti-tTg-IgA). The only therapeutic approach to celiac disease is a gluten-free diet and, if it is necessary, the administration of iron, folic acid, calcium and vitamins (K, B12). The prognosis of celiac disease is excellent, if there is an early diagnosis and the patient keeps for life a gluten free diet.
Prevalence of celiac disease in Brazilian children of short stature
Queiroz, M.S.;Nery, M.;Can?ado, E.L.;Gianella-Neto, D.;Liberman, B.;
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2004, DOI: 10.1590/S0100-879X2004000100008
Abstract: the aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children of short stature and to assess whether some of the routine laboratory examinations performed to determine the cause of short stature could suggest the presence of celiac disease. a total of 106 children of short stature and no gastrointestinal symptoms were studied. an extensive endocrine work-up had been negative for all of them and an additional investigation was performed by measuring the concentration of antiendomysial antibody. patients who were positive for antiendomysial antibody (31:10) or who exhibited iga deficiency (less than 5 mg/dl) were referred for an endoscopic intestinal biopsy. we detected a pathological titer of antiendomysial iga in six of these patients. five of them showed histological abnormalities compatible with celiac disease and one had normal histology and was considered to have potential celiac disease. the prevalence of celiac disease in the population studied was 4.7% (with another 0.9% of the subjects being considered to have potential celiac disease). the children with celiac disease did not differ in any of the parameters tested when compared to those without celiac disease, though they showed an improvement in growth velocity after treatment with a gluten-free diet. we conclude that it is important to test all children with short stature for celiac disease by measuring antiendomysial iga.
Prevalence of celiac disease in Brazilian children of short stature  [cached]
Queiroz M.S.,Nery M.,Can?ado E.L.,Gianella-Neto D.
Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research , 2004,
Abstract: The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of celiac disease in children of short stature and to assess whether some of the routine laboratory examinations performed to determine the cause of short stature could suggest the presence of celiac disease. A total of 106 children of short stature and no gastrointestinal symptoms were studied. An extensive endocrine work-up had been negative for all of them and an additional investigation was performed by measuring the concentration of antiendomysial antibody. Patients who were positive for antiendomysial antibody ( > or = 1:10) or who exhibited IgA deficiency (less than 5 mg/dl) were referred for an endoscopic intestinal biopsy. We detected a pathological titer of antiendomysial IgA in six of these patients. Five of them showed histological abnormalities compatible with celiac disease and one had normal histology and was considered to have potential celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease in the population studied was 4.7% (with another 0.9% of the subjects being considered to have potential celiac disease). The children with celiac disease did not differ in any of the parameters tested when compared to those without celiac disease, though they showed an improvement in growth velocity after treatment with a gluten-free diet. We conclude that it is important to test all children with short stature for celiac disease by measuring antiendomysial IgA.
Celiac Disease as a Potential Cause of Idiopathic Portal Hypertension: A Case Report
Yazdani S,Shokravi A.H,Sarkeshikian S,Saghafi H
Qom University of Medical Sciences Journal , 2011,
Abstract: Background and Objectives: Celiac disease can be associated with various extra intestinal symptoms such as primary biliary cirrhosis and auto immune hepatitis but idiopathic portal hypertension is a very rare phenamenon. IPH patient typically has splenomegally, esophageal varices and sometimes Icter and ascitis.Case Report: A case of IPH in a 38 year old woman with celiac disease. She had been suffering from Ascites, Splenomegally, malaise and apathy for several years and had undergone treatment for cryptogenic cirrhosis. Diagnostic re-examination of the patient such as Serology tests and markers from Wilson disease, auto immune and viral hepatitis showed negative reports, but her liver function test and ESR were prolonged In upper GI endoscopy esophageal varices was detected. Abdominal sonography reported moderate to severe splenomegally and rise of portal vein diameter but did not show any evidence of thrombosis. Liver biopsy revealed no sign of cirrhosis. But duodenal biopsy and serologic finding were compatible with celiac disease. Her symptoms improved on a gluten-free diet and her liver function test and ESR were norma
Celiac Disease as a Potential Cause of Idiopathic Portal Hypertension: A Case Report  [cached]
S Yazdani
Qom University of Medical Sciences Journal , 2012,
Abstract: Background and Objectives: Celiac disease can be associated with various extra intestinal symptoms such as primary biliary cirrhosis and auto immune hepatitis but idiopathic portal hypertension is a very rare phenamenon. IPH patient typically has splenomegally, esophageal varices and sometimes Icter and ascitis. Case Report: A case of IPH in a 38 year old woman with celiac disease. She had been suffering from Ascites, Splenomegally, malaise and apathy for several years and had undergone treatment for cryptogenic cirrhosis. Diagnostic re-examination of the patient such as Serology tests and markers from Wilson disease, auto immune and viral hepatitis showed negative reports, but her liver function test and ESR were prolonged In upper GI endoscopy esophageal varices was detected. Abdominal sonography reported moderate to severe splenomegally and rise of portal vein diameter but did not show any evidence of thrombosis. Liver biopsy revealed no sign of cirrhosis. But duodenal biopsy and serologic finding were compatible with celiac disease. Her symptoms improved on a gluten-free diet and her liver function test and ESR were normal.
Celiac disease
Wolfgang Holtmeier, Wolfgang F Caspary
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1750-1172-1-3
Abstract: Celiac disease (CD) in children and celiac sprue in adults are probably the same disorder with the same pathogenesis. The synonyms are: Coeliac disease (British spelling) – Celiac sprue – Nontropical sprue-Gluten-sensitive enteropathy – Idiopathic steatorrheaCeliac disease is a chronic intestinal disease mostly associated with malabsorption caused by intolerance to gluten. It is characterized by immune-mediated enteropathy (villous flattening), resulting in maldigestion and malabsorption. Clinical and histological improvement can be obtained after withdrawal of dietary gluten.Celiac disease is characterized by malabsorption and villous atrophy. However, diseases other than CD can cause marked villous flattening and increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) [1]. Differential diagnosis is of special importance for subjects in whom CD is suspected and who have negative serology. The following diseases, which can have similar features, must be ruled out [1-4]:? Tropical sprue? Collagenous colitis? Whipple's disease? Giardiasis? Viral enteritis? AIDS? Crohn's disease of the small intestine? Small intestinal lymphoma? Carbohydrate intolerance, cow's milk intolerance? Autoimmune enteropathy? Graft-vs-host disease? Radiation damagePrevalence of clinically overt celiac disease varies from 1/270 in Finland to 1/5,000 in North America. However, since celiac disease can be asymptomatic, most subjects are not diagnosed or they can present with atypical symptoms. In epidemiological studies aimed to assess CD prevalence, large cohorts in North America and Europe were screened for highly-sensitive endomysium or tissue transglutaminase antibodies. Besides, they underwent subsequent small intestinal biopsies when antibody testing was positive. The CD prevalence was found to be much higher than expected. Approximately 1/100 to 1/500 were found positive for antibodies and had villous atrophy of the small intestine [5-10]. Thus, up to 1% of a western population tests positive for celi
Celiac disease as a potential cause of idiopathic portal hypertension: a case report
Farhad Zamani, Afsaneh Amiri, Ramin Shakeri, Ali Zare, Mehdi Mohamadnejad
Journal of Medical Case Reports , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1752-1947-3-68
Abstract: A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital for evaluation of malaise, weight loss, abdominal swelling and lower limb edema. His paraclinical tests revealed pancytopenia, large ascites, splenomegaly and esophageal varices consistent with portal hypertension. Duodenal biopsy and serologic findings were compatible with celiac disease. His symptoms improved on a gluten-free diet, but his clinical course was further complicated with ulcerative jejunoileitis, and intestinal T-cell lymphoma.It seems that celiac disease, by an increased immune reaction in the splenoportal axis, can result in the development of idiopathic portal hypertension in susceptible affected patients.Idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) is a disorder generally classified as a noncirrhotic portal hypertension of unknown etiology, and is clinically characterized by portal hypertension, splenomegaly and pancytopenia [1].In some cases, IPH may be related to autoimmune reactions and immunologic abnormalities [2]. On the other hand, celiac disease (CD) is an immune-mediated enteropathy due to the ingestion of a gluten containing diet. It has been suggested that in CD the deposition of circulating immune complexes originating from the small bowel may cause other diseases [3]. The association of CD with IPH has been recently reported in the literature [4-6].Here we report on a patient with celiac disease complicated by idiopathic portal hypertension, whose symptoms and signs of portal hypertension improved on a gluten free diet (GFD). However, the patient's clinical course was further complicated with ulcerative jejunoileitis and intestinal T-cell lymphoma.A 54-year-old Iranian man was admitted to our hospital in May 2006 because of malaise, weight loss and edema of the lower limbs beginning 2 months prior to admission. He also had a history of iron-deficient anemia and increasing abdominal swelling for 8 months prior to admission. On physical examination he was cachectic and pale in appearance, with norm
Celiac disease  [PDF]
Radlovi? Nedeljko
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo , 2013, DOI: 10.2298/sarh1302122r
Abstract: Celiac disease is a multysystemic autoimmune disease induced by gluten in wheat, barley and rye. It is characterized by polygenic predisposition, high prevalence (1%), widely heterogeneous expression and frequent association with other autoimmune diseases, selective deficit of IgA and Down, Turner and Williams syndrome. The basis of the disease and the key finding in its diagnostics is symptomatic or asymptomatic inflammation of the small intestinal mucosa which resolves by gluten-free diet. Therefore, the basis of the treatment involves elimination diet, so that the disorder, if timely recognized and adequately treated, also characterizes excellent prognosis.
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