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Solitary Fibrous Tumour of the Pleura: A Case Report  [cached]
Bur?in ?elik,Zeynep Pelin Sürücü,Yakup Sancar Bar??
Turk Toraks Dergisi , 2013,
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura is rare and slow growing tumour that is thought to originate from submesothelial connective tissue. A sixty-eight year-old man was admitted to the clinic with cough and sputum. Thorax computed tomography revealed a 9x5 cm mass in size, with adjacent pleura at the anterior site of the left upper lobe. Transthoracic needle biopsy with guidance of thorax CT revealed a solitary fibrous tumour. Total resection of the tumour was performed through left thoracotomy. The histopathological diagnosis was solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura without any signs of malignancy. We are presenting this case because it is a rare entity.
A case of solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura presented with hemoptysis  [PDF]
Erdo?an Dada?,Duran Y?ld?z,Emine Türkmen ?amdanc?
Dicle Medical Journal , 2013,
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumors of the pleura are rare tumors thatusually have benign characteristics. These tumors areusually diagnosed in the sixth or seventh decades of lifewith equal frequency in both sexes. Chest pain, coughand dyspnea are most common complaints. In half of thepatients, the tumor is asymptomatic and usually detectedby X-ray graphics performed for another reasons. Thecomputed tomography scan of the chest is the gold standardfor diagnosis of the pleural mass due to its high sensitivityand specifity. The preoperative definitive diagnosisof PSFT is highly challenging rare clinical condition. It canbe confused with a wide range of diseases from cysts totumoral masses. The thoracotomy is necessary for definitivediagnosis and curative therapy. Complete surgicalresection provides long term survival. Here we presenteda case of PSFT about a patient who was admitted withhemoptysis, which is the least expected symptom of thedisease, and underwent thoracotomy for definitive diagnosisand curative therapy with related literature.Key words: Solitary fibrous tumor, pleura, thoracotomy
Solitary Fibrous Tumour of the Pleura Presenting as a Spontaneous Massive Haemothorax  [PDF]
Giampiero Negri,Alessandro Bandiera,Paola Ciriaco,Giulio Melloni,Angelo Carretta,George Ian Cremona,Piero Zannini
Surgery Research and Practice , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/139404
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura are rare neoplasms. These tumours are generally asymptomatic and incidentally diagnosed. Symptoms, if present, are nonspecific such as cough, dyspnea, and chest pain. This report describes the case of a 38-year-old woman admitted to our department after the onset of a right massive spontaneous haemothorax requiring emergency surgical treatment. Intraoperatively a bleeding pleural mass was found to be the cause of the haemothorax. The tumour was successfully resected and the patient made an uneventful recovery. Histological examination revealed the mass to be a solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura. 1. Introduction Solitary fibrous tumours of the pleura (SFTP) are rare tumours of mesenchymal origin. SFTP may arise from the visceral or the parietal pleura and may present as small nodules or large masses. For the most part, SFTP are chance findings as they are usually asymptomatic. Symptoms, when present, are generally due to a mass effect and compression and are the same as those observed with other intrathoracic masses, namely, cough, thoracic pain, and dyspnea. Other symptoms, such as haemoptysis, and paraneoplastic syndromes and most commonly a refractory hypoglycemia have been reported [1–4]. In a few cases serous pleural effusion may also be associated with SFTP. To the best of our knowledge, SFTP presenting as a spontaneous haemothorax has been very rarely described in the literature [5–7]. This report describes the case of a 38-year-old woman admitted to our Department of Thoracic Surgery for a right massive spontaneous haemothorax. Emergency surgical thoracotomy revealed a bleeding mass arising from the parietal pleura to be the cause of the haemorrhage. Resection of the mass halted the bleeding and subsequent pathological evaluation revealed it to be a benign SFTP. 2. Case Report A 38-year-old woman was referred to our Department of Thoracic Surgery for a right massive spontaneous haemothorax. She was initially assessed by the Emergency Department of another hospital where she complained of acute right chest pain and dyspnea. A chest radiograph performed on initial evaluation revealed a right pleural effusion. Computed tomography of the chest indicated the nature of the pleural effusion to be consistent with a haemothorax. A parietal paravertebral opacity, suspected to be an intrathoracic tumour surrounded by blood clots, was detected (Figure 1). The patient was urgently transferred to our department for surgical evaluation. The clinical status of the patient rapidly worsened with hypotension and
Solitary Fibrous Tumors and So-Called Hemangiopericytoma  [PDF]
Nicolas Penel,Eric Yaovi Amela,Gauthier Decanter,Yves-Marie Robin,Perrine Marec-Berard
Sarcoma , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/690251
Abstract: We have reviewed the literature data regarding the spectrum of tumors including solitary fibrous tumor and hemangiopericytoma with special focus on definition of the disease, discussion of the criteria for malignancy, and the key elements of standard treatment of localized disease. We have discussed the emerging concepts on the tumor biology and the different systemic treatments (chemotherapy and molecular-targeted therapies).
Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura presenting with syncope episodes when coughing
Luigi Santambrogio, Mario Nosotti, Alessandro Palleschi, Lorenzo Rosso, Davide Tosi, Matilde De Simone, Michele M Ciulla, Marco Maggioni, Ugo Cioffi
World Journal of Surgical Oncology , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1477-7819-6-86
Abstract: We herein describe a case of 72 year-old man with head, facial, and thoracic traumas caused by neurally-mediated situational syncope when coughing. The diagnostic work-up including chest x-ray, CT and PET, revealed a large solitary mass of the left hemithorax. Radical surgical resection of the mass was performed through a left lateral thoracotomy and completed with a wedge resection of the lingula. Hystological examination of the surgical specimen showed an encapsulated mass measuring 12 × 11.5 × 6 cm consistent with a solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura. It's surgical removal definitively resolved the neurologic manifestations. The patient had no postoperative complications. At two years follow-up the patient is free from recurrence and without clinical manifestations.In our case its resection definitively resolved the episodes of situational syncope due, in our opinion, to the large thoracic mass compressing the phrenic nerveFirst described by Klemperer and Rabin [1], the solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura (SFTP) is a localized benign neoplasm arising from the submesothelial mesenchymal layer [2] even if malignant forms have also been described [3]. With about 800 cases reported in the world literature, this rare entity contrast with the primary diffuse pleural mesothelioma that have an incidence of 3000 new cases every year in the USA [4]. In over half of patients the tumor is asymptomatic, but if symptoms occur then chest pain, cough and dyspnea are the most common complaints. Complete en bloc surgical resection is the treatment of choice for these neoplasms offering a cure in all patients with benign form even if tumor recurrence may occur also in tumors with benign histological features [4,5]. We describe an unreported case of SFTP, to our knowledge, manifesting with syncope episodes when coughing.A 72 year-old man was admitted to the hospital for head injury, facial and left hemithorax contusions. The patient referred to had fainted after coughing; the sam
A Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura Revealed by Hiccups
A. Chafik,M. Alaoui,A. Benjelloune,Y. Qamouss
Case Reports in Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/574319
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumors of the pleura are rare and benign primary localized tumors; they possess a malignant potential and thus should be excised. We report a case of a 43-year-old woman, who had suffered for 5 years from right basithoracic pain associated with progressive dyspnea and persistent hiccups during the last 6 months. We have not found any similar case in the literature. Further testing after excision by thoracotomy revealed a solitary fibrous pleural tumor. A brief discussion of the clinical presentation and incidence of these tumors is included.
Solitary Fibrous Tumor of the Pleura - a Case Report
Sedat Alt?n,Erdo?an ?etinkaya,Sinem Nedime S?kücü,Levent Karasulu
Turk Toraks Dergisi , 2008,
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura is a mostly benign and rare tumor. Its diagnosis and treatment can be made by surgical resection of the mass. Clinical presentation varies according to the size and intrathoracic localization of the tumor. A fortynine year old female with symptoms of cough and dispnea had a mass in her right lung.The lesion was resected by surgery. Immunohistochemically tumor cells stained positively for CD 34 and vimentine but there was no reactivity for pansitokeratin, demsin, CD31, S100 or South Musde Aktin. Due to these findings, it was histopathologically diagnosed as a pleural solitary fibrous tumor. We presented our case who did not show recurrence in her follow up for 2 years together with a review of the literature.
A silent gigantic solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura: case report
Nobuyuki Furukawa, Bert Hansky, Jost Niedermeyer, Jan Gummert, Andre Renner
Journal of Cardiothoracic Surgery , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1749-8090-6-122
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumors (SFT) of the pleura are rare intrathoracic neoplasm. Immunohistochemical analysis has confirmed that SFTs originate from mesenchyme underlying the mesothelial layer of the pleura. Although they are usually asymptomatic, larger tumors occupying a large space in the thoracic cavity, present more commonly with symptoms such as dyspnea, chest pain and malaise. Although the tumor was large enough to push the descending aorta and other mediastinal structures to the right, our patient displayed no symptoms other than malaise. We successfully resected the huge tumor via two separate thoracotomies. One year later, the patient is in good health without tumor recurrence.A 57-year-old man was referred to a hospital because of progressive general malaise for a month. His medical history was unremarkable and he had no history of exposure to asbestos. At physical examination, breath sounds were absent on the left lower region. A roentgenogram showed a giant tumor in the left thorax (Figure 1A). The heart appeared to be compressed towards the right side. He had no other chest complaints, such as cough, chest pain, and dyspnea. Computed tomography (CT) revealed a well-circumscribed homogeneous mass, which compressed the descending aorta (Figure 1B). The hematological and biochemical findings were normal. Bronchofiberoscopy showed stenosis of the left lower lobar bronchus from extraluminal compression. Bronchoscopic cytology revealed no abnormal findings and no evidence of bronchitis. CT-guided biopsy demonstrated fibrotic soft tissue without evidence of malignancy but the appearance of the specimen did not have enough diagnostic strength. Spirometry showed the following results: vital capacity, 2.4 L (49% of predicted); forced expiratory volume in a second, 1.7 L (42% of predicted). Results of blood gas analysis were also within normal limits. The patient was referred to our institution for surgical treatment of a suspected SFT.Left posterolateral thoracotomy
Solitary Fibrous Tumors and So-Called Hemangiopericytoma  [PDF]
Nicolas Penel,Eric Yaovi Amela,Gauthier Decanter,Yves-Marie Robin,Perrine Marec-Berard
Sarcoma , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/690251
Abstract: We have reviewed the literature data regarding the spectrum of tumors including solitary fibrous tumor and hemangiopericytoma with special focus on definition of the disease, discussion of the criteria for malignancy, and the key elements of standard treatment of localized disease. We have discussed the emerging concepts on the tumor biology and the different systemic treatments (chemotherapy and molecular-targeted therapies). 1. Introduction Solitary Fibrous Tumor (SFT) constitutes a heterogeneous group of rare spindle-cell tumors that include benign and malignant neoplasms. Their cell of origin is still debated. SFT is preferred by most pathologists as a better term than “hemangiopericytoma” that gathers numerous unrelated entities and is presently only employed by neuropathologists [1]. We focus the present paper on the forms of this family of tumors occurring in adult patients. There are 3 typical primary locations: pleural, meningeal and extrathoracic soft tissue. 2. Classical Clinical Forms 2.1. Pleural SFT Most of SFT (80%) are benign neoplasms. They are most commonly diagnosed in adults aged of about 50–70 [2–4]. The M/F gender ratio is about 1. There is no identified risk factor: no association with asbestosis, tobacco consumption or other environmental factor. Pleurodynia, cough, and dyspnea are the most frequent revealing symptoms [2–4]. Most of patients are symptomatic at the time of diagnosis [5]. Two paraneoplastic manifestations could be seen: paraneoplastic osteoarthropathy (pulmonary osteo-arthropathy) and more rarely paraneoplastic hypoglycemia (Doege-Potter syndrome) [4, 6]. In the Magdeleinat series, osteoarthropathy and hypoglycemia occurred in 4/60 and 1/60 cases, respectively [3]. Hypoglycemia is most commonly associated with massive SFT (mean tumor size of about 20?cm), and about 40% of the SFT associated with hypoglycemia are malignant [6]. The mechanism causing this symptom is likely the tumor-producing nonsuppressible insulin-like active substances and insulin-like growth factors (see below). Control of the hypoglycemic episodes occurs rapidly after complete tumor removal. CT scan classically shows a sessile or a pedunculated pleural mass. Calcifications in the tumor could be seen in both benign and malignant cases [5]. The mean main diameter is about 8?cm (ranged, from 1 to more than 30?cm) [3, 5]. The experience with fluorodeoxyglucose PET is limited; in the Kohler report, PET seemed to be “positive” in 3/3 malignant tumors and negative in 3/3 “benign” SFT [5]. This tumor arises more commonly from the visceral (80%) [3] than
Solitary fibrous tumor of the visceral pleura of the right lung base
Radak Vladimir,Radovanovi? Dragan,Grubor Nikica,Micev Marijan
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo , 2006, DOI: 10.2298/sarh0610441r
Abstract: Solitary fibrous tumors are relatively frequent. They may occur throughout the body. About 20% of tumors develop in the thorax, out of which vast majority is localized on its wall. Within thorax, they usually originate from pleura, most frequently the visceral one. Authors present a 67- year old male in whom the tumor was diagnosed during the investigation for dyspnea. During operation, solitary, well circumscribed, firm, rubber-like tumour, 11x10x9 cm in diameter, covered with serosa, arising from the visceral pleura of the base of the right lung was easily excised. The classical histological and immunohistochemical examinations confirmed the diagnosis of benign fibrous tumor. Postoperative recovery was uneventful. Preoperative symptoms disappeared.
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