oalib
Search Results: 1 - 10 of 100 matches for " "
All listed articles are free for downloading (OA Articles)
Page 1 /100
Display every page Item
Mitochondrial DNA mutations--candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladesh  [cached]
Gazi Nurun Nahar Sultana,Atiqur Rahman,Abu Din Ahmed Shahinuzzaman,Rowshan Ara Begum
Chinese Journal of Cancer , 2012, DOI: 10.5732/cjc.012.10024
Abstract: Breast cancer is a major health problem that affects more than 24% of women in Bangladesh. Further- more, among low-income countries including Bangladesh, individuals have a high risk for developing breast cancer. This study aimed to identify candidate mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women to be used as a preventive approach. We screened the blood samples from 24 breast cancer patients and 20 healthy controls to detect polymorphisms in the D-loop and the ND3- and ND4-coding regions of mtDNA by direct sequencing. Among 14 distinct mutations, 10 polymorphisms were found in the D-loop, 3 were found in the ND3-coding region, and 1 was found in the ND4-coding region. The frequency of two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop, one at position 16290 (T-ins) and the other at position 16293 (A-del), was higher in breast cancer patients than in control subjects (position 16290: odds ratio = 6.011, 95% confidence interval = 1.2482 to 28.8411, P = 0.002; position 16293: odds ratio = 5.6028, 95% confidence interval = 1.4357 to 21.8925, P = 0.010). We also observed one novel mutation in the ND3-coding region at position 10316 (A > G) in 69% of breast cancer patients but not in control subjects. The study suggests that two novel polymorphisms in the D-loop may be candidate biomarkers for breast cancer diagnosis in Bangladeshi women.
Biomarkers as prognostic factors in endometrial cancer.  [cached]
Bo?ena Dobrzycka,S?awomir J Terlikowski
Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica , 2010, DOI: 10.5603/4195
Abstract: Endometrial cancer is the most common gynecologic malignancy in more developed countries. Approximately 75% of cases are diagnosed at an early stage with a tumor confined to the uterine corpus. Although most patients are cured by surgery alone, about 15-20% with no signs of locally advanced or metastatic disease at primary treatment recurs, with limited responsiveness to systemic therapy. The most common basis for determining the risk of recurrent disease has been classification of endometrial cancers into two subtypes. Type I, associated with a good prognosis and endometrioid histology and type II, associated with a poor prognosis and non-endometrioid histology. This review will focus primarily on the molecular biomarkers that have supported the dualistic model of endometrial carcinoma and help determine which patients would benefit from either adjuvant therapy or more aggressive primary treatment.
Trends in the demographic and clinicopathological characteristics in Japanese patients with endometrial cancer, 1990–2010
Honda T, Urabe R, Kurita T, Kagami S, Kawagoe T, Toki N, Matsuura Y, Hachisuga T
International Journal of Women's Health , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S31541
Abstract: ends in the demographic and clinicopathological characteristics in Japanese patients with endometrial cancer, 1990–2010 Original Research (1614) Total Article Views Authors: Honda T, Urabe R, Kurita T, Kagami S, Kawagoe T, Toki N, Matsuura Y, Hachisuga T Published Date May 2012 Volume 2012:4 Pages 207 - 212 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWH.S31541 Received: 06 March 2012 Accepted: 05 April 2012 Published: 14 May 2012 Taisei Honda, Rie Urabe, Tomoko Kurita, Seiji Kagami, Toshinori Kawagoe, Naoyuki Toki, Yusuke Matsuura, Toru Hachisuga Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan Objective: Over the past 20 years, the incidence of endometrial cancer has increased remarkably in Japan. The number of elderly females has also increased within the population of Japan. We examined the impact of advanced age on the demographic and clinicopathological characteristics in Japanese patients with endometrial cancer. Methods: Data were collected from 319 surgically treated Japanese females with endometrial cancer from the files of the University Hospital of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan, between 1990 and 2010. χ2 tests were performed to evaluate the trends in the variables between two decades (A: 116 cases from 1990–2000) and (B: 203 cases in 2001–2010). The histological subtypes were also evaluated based on the immunohistochemical expressions of p53, estrogen receptor, and Ki-67. Results: The mean ages ± standard deviation in the decade A group and the decade B group were 57.5 years ± 9.7 years and 61.0 years ± 11.3 years, respectively (P < 0.02). There was an increase in the proportion of patients aged 70 years or older and of high-risk histological tumors including serous carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and carcinosarcoma (decade A group and decade B group: 9.5% vs 27.6%, P < 0.001, 10.4% vs 21.6%, P = 0.01, respectively), while the advanced surgical stage (III and IV), obesity (≥25 of body mass index), and nulliparity of the decade A group and decade B group were 23.3% vs 29.1%, P = 0.30, 28.4% vs 33.0%, P = 0.40, and 19.0% vs 21.2%, P = 0.66, respectively. The cancer-specific survival rates in the decade A group and the decade B group were 78.6% and 77.6%, respectively (P = 0.93). Conclusion: The increase in number of elderly females in the Japanese population is related to the increase in that of high-risk endometrial cancers. A study is needed to investigate prevention strategies and to improve the treatment of elderly patients with high-risk endometrial cancer.
Hypermethylated 14-3-3-σ and ESR1 gene promoters in serum as candidate biomarkers for the diagnosis and treatment efficacy of breast cancer metastasis
Mercedes Zurita, Pedro C Lara, Rosario del Moral, Blanca Torres, José Linares-Fernández, Sandra Arrabal, Joaquina Martínez-Galán, Francisco Oliver, José Ruiz de Almodóvar
BMC Cancer , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-10-217
Abstract: We studied two cohorts of patients: 77 patients treated for breast cancer with no signs of disease, and 34 patients with metastatic breast cancer. DNA was obtained from serum samples, and promoter methylation status was determined by using DNA bisulfite modification and quantitative methylation-specific PCR.Serum levels of methylated gene promoter 14-3-3-σ significantly differed between Control and Metastatic Breast Cancer groups (P < 0.001), and between Disease-Free and Metastatic Breast Cancer groups (P < 0.001). The ratio of the 14-3-3-σ level before the first chemotherapy cycle to the level just before administration of the second chemotherapy cycle was defined as the Biomarker Response Ratio [BRR]. We calculated BRR values for the "continuous decline" and "rise-and-fall" groups. Subsequent ROC analysis showed a sensitivity of 75% (95% CI: 47.6 - 86.7) and a specificity of 66.7% (95% CI: 41.0 - 86.7) to discriminate between the groups for a cut-off level of BRR = 2.39. The area under the ROC curve (Z = 0.804 ± 0.074) indicates that this test is a good approach to post-treatment prognosis.The relationship of 14-3-3-σ with breast cancer metastasis and progression found in this study suggests a possible application of 14-3-3-σ as a biomarker to screen for metastasis and to follow up patients treated for metastatic breast cancer, monitoring their disease status and treatment response.Breast cancer is a major health problem, with more than 1,000,000 new cases and 370,000 deaths annually worldwide. Over the past decade, breast cancer mortality has been declining in the majority of developed countries, despite an increasing incidence. This is the combined result of better education, widespread screening programs, and more efficacious adjuvant treatments. Furthermore, improved knowledge of breast cancer biology now allows the majority of breast cancer patients to be spared the cosmetic, physical, and psychological consequences of radical treatment, including radiotherap
Trends in the demographic and clinicopathological characteristics in Japanese patients with endometrial cancer, 1990–2010  [cached]
Honda T,Urabe R,Kurita T,Kagami S
International Journal of Women's Health , 2012,
Abstract: Taisei Honda, Rie Urabe, Tomoko Kurita, Seiji Kagami, Toshinori Kawagoe, Naoyuki Toki, Yusuke Matsuura, Toru HachisugaDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Occupational and Environmental Health School of Medicine, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, JapanObjective: Over the past 20 years, the incidence of endometrial cancer has increased remarkably in Japan. The number of elderly females has also increased within the population of Japan. We examined the impact of advanced age on the demographic and clinicopathological characteristics in Japanese patients with endometrial cancer.Methods: Data were collected from 319 surgically treated Japanese females with endometrial cancer from the files of the University Hospital of Occupational and Environmental Health, Yahatanishi-ku, Kitakyushu, Japan, between 1990 and 2010. χ2 tests were performed to evaluate the trends in the variables between two decades (A: 116 cases from 1990–2000) and (B: 203 cases in 2001–2010). The histological subtypes were also evaluated based on the immunohistochemical expressions of p53, estrogen receptor, and Ki-67.Results: The mean ages ± standard deviation in the decade A group and the decade B group were 57.5 years ± 9.7 years and 61.0 years ± 11.3 years, respectively (P < 0.02). There was an increase in the proportion of patients aged 70 years or older and of high-risk histological tumors including serous carcinoma, clear cell carcinoma, and carcinosarcoma (decade A group and decade B group: 9.5% vs 27.6%, P < 0.001, 10.4% vs 21.6%, P = 0.01, respectively), while the advanced surgical stage (III and IV), obesity (≥25 of body mass index), and nulliparity of the decade A group and decade B group were 23.3% vs 29.1%, P = 0.30, 28.4% vs 33.0%, P = 0.40, and 19.0% vs 21.2%, P = 0.66, respectively. The cancer-specific survival rates in the decade A group and the decade B group were 78.6% and 77.6%, respectively (P = 0.93).Conclusion: The increase in number of elderly females in the Japanese population is related to the increase in that of high-risk endometrial cancers. A study is needed to investigate prevention strategies and to improve the treatment of elderly patients with high-risk endometrial cancer.Keywords: endometrial cancer, advanced age, nonendometrioid carcinoma
Clinicopathological Role of Serum-Derived Hyaluronan-Associated Protein (SHAP)-Hyaluronan Complex in Endometrial Cancer  [PDF]
Hiromitsu Yabushita,Keita Iwasaki,Kouhei Kanyama,Yukihiko Obayashi,Lisheng Zhuo,Naoki Itano,Koji Kimata,Akihiko Wakatsuki
Obstetrics and Gynecology International , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/739150
Abstract: The role of hyaluronan (HA), serum-derived HA-associated protein (SHAP)-HA complex and hyaluronan synthase (HAS) in endometrial carcinomas was investigated. The relationship of metalloproteinase (MMP) and its inhibitor (TIMP) with HA and the SHAP-HA complex was also examined. The expression of HAS1 was related to the depth of myometrial invasion and lymph-vascular space involvement. The serum levels of HA, SHAP-HA complex, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 were increased in related with the depth of myometrial invasion, histological grade and lymph-vascular space involvement. They were also higher in the HAS1-positive group compared to -negative group. The serum concentrations of HA and SHAP-HA complex had a significant correlation with the MMP-9 and TIMP-1. The patients with elevated SHAP-HA complex had the shorter disease-free survival. The multivariate analysis revealed that the SHAP-HA complex was the independent variable for disease-free survival of endometrial cancer patients. In conclusion, the elevation of serum SHAP-HA complex depended on the HAS1 expression and the SHAP-HA complex is a useful marker to predict disease recurrence in endometrial cancer patients. The SHAP-HA complex may promote the lymph-vascular space involvement and the synthesis and activation of MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in the progression of endometrial cancer. 1. Introduction The incidence rate for endometrial cancer has been increasing in Japan [1]. Clinicopathological studies show that poor prognosis is related to cervical invasion of malignant cells, deep myometrial invasion of malignant cells, lymph node metastasis, and lymph-vascular space involvement of malignant cells [2, 3]. The multistage process of tumor invasion and metastasis depends on several mechanisms, including the stimulation of cell growth by growth factors, destruction of the extracellular matrix by proteolytic enzymes, neovascularization due to the presence of angiogenic factors, and cell to cell or stroma adhesion regulated by cell adhesion molecules. Hyaluronan (HA) is an extracellular polysaccharide typically present in the extracellular matrix of some epithelial and neural tissues. HA is particularly abundant in connective tissues. HA controls cell migration, differentiation, and proliferation, thereby influencing tissue morphogenesis, wound healing, and tumor growth [4, 5]. HA levels correlate with the invasiveness and metastatic capacity of tumor cells [6]. Increased HA concentrations may help invasion by providing a less dense matrix for cancer cells [7], stimulating cancer cell motility, and forming an immunoprotective
A List of Candidate Cancer Biomarkers for Targeted Proteomics
Malu Polanski,N. Leigh Anderson
Biomarker Insights , 2006,
Abstract: We have compiled from literature and other sources a list of 1261 proteins believed to be differentially expressed in human cancer. These proteins, only some of which have been detected in plasma to date, represent a population of candidate plasma biomarkers that could be useful in early cancer detection and monitoring given suffi ciently sensitive specific assays. We have begun to prioritize these markers for future validation by frequency of literature citations, both total and as a function of time. The candidates include proteins involved in oncogenesis, angiogenesis, development, differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, hematopoiesis, immune and hormonal responses, cell signaling, nucleotide function, hydrolysis, cellular homing, cell cycle and structure, the acute phase response and hormonal control. Many have been detected in studies of tissue or nuclear components; nevertheless we hypothesize that most if not all should be present in plasma at some level. Of the 1261 candidates only 9 have been approved as "tumor associated antigens" by the FDA. We propose that systematic collection and large-scale validation of candidate biomarkers would fi ll the gap currently existing between basic research and clinical use of advanced diagnostics.
EGFR isoforms and gene regulation in human endometrial cancer cells
Lina Albitar, Gavin Pickett, Marilee Morgan, Jason A Wilken, Nita J Maihle, Kimberly K Leslie
Molecular Cancer , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1476-4598-9-166
Abstract: We investigated whether EGFR mutations are present in the tyrosine kinase domain (exons 18-22) of EGFR and also whether EGFR isoforms are expressed in the Ishikawa H or Hec50co cell lines. Sequence of the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain proved to be wild type in both cell lines. While both cell lines expressed full-length EGFR (isoform A), EGFR and sEGFR (isoform D) were expressed at significantly lower levels in Hec50co cells compared to Ishikawa H cells. Analysis of gene expression following EGF vs. gefitinib treatment (a small molecule EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor) was performed. Early growth response 1, sphingosine kinase 2, dual specificity phosphatase 6, and glucocorticoid receptor DNA binding factor 1 are members of a cluster of genes downstream of EGFR that are differentially regulated by treatment with EGF compared to gefitinib in Ishikawa H cells, but not in Hec50co cells.Type I Ishikawa H and type II Hec50co endometrial carcinoma cells both express EGFR and sEGFR, but differ markedly in their responsiveness to the EGFR inhibitor gefitinib. This difference is paralleled by differences in the expression of sEGFR and EGFR, as well as in their transcriptional response following treatment with either EGF or gefitinib. The small cluster of differently regulated genes reported here in these type I vs. type II endometrial cancer-derived cell lines may identify candidate biomarkers useful for predicting sensitivity to EGFR blockade.Endometrial carcinoma is the most common gynecologic malignancy in American women [1-3]. Type I endometrial cancers are generally of endometrioid subtype, well differentiated, express estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER and PR), and develop in a setting of estrogen excess unopposed by the differentiating effects of progesterone [4,5]. Ishikawa H, a cell line derived from a moderately differentiated endometrioid type I adenocarcinoma [6], is hormone receptor positive and forms rudimentary glandular structures in culture [7,8]. In contr
Quantitative proteomic analysis by iTRAQ? for the identification of candidate biomarkers in ovarian cancer serum
Kristin LM Boylan, John D Andersen, Lorraine B Anderson, LeeAnn Higgins, Amy PN Skubitz
Proteome Science , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1477-5956-8-31
Abstract: Medium and low abundance proteins from 6 serum pools of 10 patients each from women with serous ovarian carcinoma, and 6 non-cancer control pools were labeled with isobaric tags using iTRAQ? to determine the relative abundance of serum proteins identified by MS. A total of 220 unique proteins were identified and fourteen proteins were elevated in ovarian cancer compared to control serum pools, including several novel candidate ovarian cancer biomarkers: extracellular matrix protein-1, leucine-rich alpha-2 glycoprotein-1, lipopolysaccharide binding protein-1, and proteoglycan-4. Western immunoblotting validated the relative increases in serum protein levels for several of the proteins identified.This study provides the first analysis of immunodepleted serum in combination with iTRAQ? to measure relative protein expression in ovarian cancer patients for the pursuit of serum biomarkers. Several candidate biomarkers were identified which warrant further development.Ovarian cancer results in over 14,000 deaths each year, making it the fifth leading cause of cancer-related deaths for women in the United States [1]. The high mortality rate is due, in part, to the fact that over 80% of cases are diagnosed after the cancer has spread beyond the ovary. When ovarian cancer is detected early, the survival rate is over 90% [2], highlighting the need for biomarkers for early detection.Current biomarkers for ovarian cancer detection and screening are inadequate. The antigen CA125 is elevated in the sera of most patients diagnosed with ovarian cancer [3,4]. However, CA125 lacks the sensitivity and specificity required for general screening, although it is commonly used to monitor for recurrence. Many researchers have attempted to find protein biomarkers for ovarian cancer to replace or be used in conjunction with CA125 in order to improve the sensitivity and specificity of diagnostic tests (reviewed in [5]).Recently, methods for quantitative MS-based proteomics have allowed the dir
Unusual Presentation of Endometrial Cancer: A Clinicopathological Study of One Case  [PDF]
J. Munné, F. Alameda, A. Bergueiro, G. Mancebo, L. Garrigós, T. Baró, B. Lloveras, J. Gimeno, R. Carreras, S. Serrano
Open Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (OJOG) , 2015, DOI: 10.4236/ojog.2015.51004
Abstract:

Endometrial carcinoma is the most frequent genital tract malignancy. The first symptom (guide-symptom) is usually metrorrhagia; however, in around 10% of cases it is not. In contrast, osseous metastases are infrequent in endometrial cancer. The bones of the pelvis and lower extremities are those most frequently involved in disseminated metastatic diseases. In these cases, endometrial cancer is usually high grade (Grade III). Case report: 56-year-old woman who presented right inguinal pain. The X-ray showed a lithic lesion in the right ischium. A histopathological study demonstrated a metastatic lesion, suspected to be endometrial cancer. The computer tomography scan revealed a uterine mass and a second lithic lesion in the right tibia. The patient received chemotherapy (carboplatin and paclitaxel), and the bone lesions were irradiated. The patient is still alive 18 months after the diagnosis. This case emphasizes the importance of considering an endometrial primary tumor when evaluating bone metastasis of unknown primary cancer.

Page 1 /100
Display every page Item


Home
Copyright © 2008-2017 Open Access Library. All rights reserved.