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Endovascular Treatment of a Giant Aneurysm of the Maxillary Artery
J. A. Stephenson,S. Panteleimonitis,E. Choke,M. Dennis,M. Glasby
Case Reports in Vascular Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1155/2011/818241
Abstract: Aneurysms of the maxillary artery are rare and the majority of the literature refers to false aneurysms. We report the first case of what we believe to be a spontaneous true maxillary artery aneurysm and its endovascular management.
Corre o endovascular de aneurisma da artéria esplénica: caso clínico Endovascular correction of splenic artery aneurysm: case report  [cached]
José Almeida Lopes,Daniel Brand?o,Armando Mansilha
Angiologia e Cirurgia Vascular , 2012,
Abstract: Os aneurismas da artéria esplénica, embora sejam os aneurismas esplancnicos mais frequentes, cursam com uma prevalência de apenas 0,01%. Neste contexto os autores apresentam um caso clínico de uma doente de 41 anos com aneurisma da artéria esplénica de 20x29mm, tratada através da coloca o de um stent coberto auto-expansível (Gore , Viabahn ). é realizada uma revis o da literatura, das possíveis complica es e feita referência às várias hipóteses de tratamento, dando particular ênfase às novas técnicas endovasculares. Splenic artery aneurysms, although they are the most common splanchnic aneurysms, they have a prevalence of only 0,01%. In this context the authors present a case report of a 41 years female patient with a splenic artery aneurysm of 20x29mm, treated by deployment of a covered self-expandable stent (Gore Viabahn ). It is performed a literature review of the pathology in question, possible complications and made reference to the various treatment options, with particular emphasis on the new endovascular techniques.
Surgical Treatment of a Ruptured Giant Renal Artery Aneurysm - Case Report and Literature Review
Krzysztof Paruzel, ukasz Krakowczyk, Boles aw Ole
Polish Journal of Surgery , 2011, DOI: 10.2478/v10035-011-0053-1
Abstract: Renal artery aneurysms are the second most common visceral artery aneurysms after splenic artery aneurysms, and before hepatic artery aneurysms. The study presented a case of a ruptured giant right renal artery aneurysm in a female patient. The presented case is worth mentioning, due to the giant size of the lesion. The diameter of the aneurysm exceeded 10 cm. Available literature data mentioned single reports of such large aneurysms located in the renal arteries. In spite of the fact that renal artery aneurysms are the second most common visceral artery aneurysms, their management is accompanied by some controversy. Literature data mentioned the dominance of endovascular techniques. However, surgical treatment remains to be the most effective and radical method.
Endovascular Treatment of a Ruptured Splenic Artery Aneurysm using Amplatzer Vascular Plug  [cached]
UD Manian,H Badri,PE Coyne,CA Nice
International Journal of Biomedical Science , 2009,
Abstract: Splenic Artery Aneurysms are commonly detected incidentally and can present acutely as a source of intra-abdominal catastrophe. Management options include both surgical and endovascular repair. The role of endovascular repair in an haemodynamically stable acute rupture is undefined and the use of Amplatzer Vascular Plug has not to our knowledge been reported.
Transcatheter Embolization for Giant Splenic Artery Aneurisms: Still an Open Question  [PDF]
Marianna Mastroroberto,Sonia Berardi,Matteo Renzulli,Caterina Maggioli,Paolo Pianta,Antonio Daniele Pinna,Rita Golfieri,Claudia Sama
Case Reports in Radiology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/652469
Abstract: Transcatheter embolization is the mainstay of the therapy of splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs) in patients with portal hypertension. It is indicated when the SAA diameter reaches 20?mm. Although endovascular techniques are effective and safe for the treatment of medium-sized SAAs, little is known about their applicability to large-sized SAAs. Herein, we report a case of giant SAA, which was treated with transcatheter coil embolization. The case was not considered suitable for surgery because of the presence of severe portal hypertension. The procedure was complicated by bacterial infection of the coils within the aneurismatic sac, leading to the development of hepatic failure. A liver transplant was then successfully performed despite the presence of a nonresponsive infection. 1. Introduction Portal hypertension is associated with the development of splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs) [1–3], where the risk of spontaneous rupture increases with the aneurysm diameter. SAAs treatment is indicated when the aneurysm diameter reaches 20?mm. Although open surgery has been the mainstay of therapy, in recent years endovascular techniques became the first-line therapy. The mean diameter of SAAs treated with endovascular techniques is usually below 40?mm [4, 5], while the role of these techniques for bulkier SAAs is less well defined. Herein, we report a case of an unusually voluminous SAA in a patient with portal hypertension treated with transcatheter coil embolization. 2. Case Report In August 2009, a 60-year-old man with cryptogenetic cirrhosis was referred to our centre. His history revealed splenomegaly from the age of 16, with secondary thrombocytopenia. No clinical signs of decompensation of the liver disease were present: MELD score was 13 and Child-Pugh-Turcotte score B7. Physical examination showed splenomegaly and the presence of a pulsing voluminous mass, and vascular murmur in the middle and left upper abdominal quadrants was noted. Platelet count was 26.000/microL (normal values: 150.000–380.000/microL), and small esophageal varices were documented at endoscopy. The patient underwent a computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen which showed liver cirrhosis with signs of portal hypertension, a tortuous and ectasic splenic artery with some widely dilated sections (max 24?mm caliber), and massive aneurysmal dilation in the middle tract (90?mm of maximum diameter) with partly calcified walls, inducing a cranial displacement of the tail and the body of the pancreas (Figure 1). Figure 1: Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen showing a tortuous and ectasic
Endovascular embolisation of Giant Ruptured Proximal Splenic Arterial Pseudoaneurysm Using Microcoils & Glue: Case Report  [PDF]
Jawahar Rathod, Kishor Taori, Sachin Dhomne, Prakash Pawar, Devkaran Vaghasiya, Amit Disawal, Amrita Guha, Kiran Naiknavare, Rahul Agale, Prajwleet Gour
Surgical Science (SS) , 2011, DOI: 10.4236/ss.2011.25062
Abstract: Splenic artery aneurysms (SAA) are third most common intra-abdominal aneurysm (after aneurysms of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries). A splenic artery aneurysm larger than 3 cm is even rare. Splenic artery aneurysms are fatal vascular lesions if ruptured. The incidence of rupture is increased in larger aneurysms. Transcatheter arterial embolization is an alternative method of treatment in a patient with splenic arterial aneurysm which has relative lower morbidity and mortality than surgical procedures. Here, we report a case of giant ruptured proximal splenic artery pseudoaneurysm detected by contrast enhanced computed tomography (CECT) & referred to Interventional Radiology for Transcatheter arterial embolisation.
Haemosuccus pancreaticus due to true splenic artery aneurysm: a rare cause of massive upper gastrointestinal bleeding
S Sadhu,S Sarkar,R Verma,SK Dubey
Journal of Surgical Case Reports , 2010,
Abstract: “Haemosuccus pancreaticus” is an unusual cause of severe upper gastrointestinal bleeding and results from rupture of splenic artery aneurysm into the pancreatic duct. More commonly, it is a pseudoaneurysm of the splenic artery which develops as sequelae of pancreatitis. However, true aneurysm of the splenic artery without pancreatitis has rarely been incriminated as the etiologic factor of this condition. Owing to the paucity of cases and limited knowledge about the disease, diagnosis as well as treatment become challenging. Here we describe a 60-year-old male presenting with severe recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding and abdominal pain, which, after considerable delay, was diagnosed to be due to splenic artery aneurysm. Following an unsuccessful endovascular embolisation, the patient was cured by distal pancreatectomy and ligation of aneurysm.
Aneurisma de la arteria esplénica: Diagnóstico diferencial y alternativas terapéuticas Splenic artery aneurysm: Case report  [cached]
Demetrio Larraín de la C,Mario Fava P,Ricardo Espinoza G
Revista médica de Chile , 2005,
Abstract: Splenic artery aneurysms are rare and occur predominantly in women. Most of them are asymptomatic until rupture. We report a previously healthy 73 year-old woman who presented with non specific symptoms: dyspepsia and constipation. Laboratory tests were normal. Subsequent examinations (ultrasound and CT) showed a large aneurysm of the splenic artery without any sign of rupture. Endovascular treatment remained successfully performed using coil embolization. During a 12-months follow-up period, the patient was asymptomatic and no evidences of complications or splenic infarction were observed on CT scans
Transcatheter Embolization for Giant Splenic Artery Aneurisms: Still an Open Question
Marianna Mastroroberto,Sonia Berardi,Matteo Renzulli,Caterina Maggioli,Paolo Pianta,Antonio Daniele Pinna,Rita Golfieri,Claudia Sama
Case Reports in Radiology , 2012, DOI: 10.1155/2012/652469
Abstract: Transcatheter embolization is the mainstay of the therapy of splenic artery aneurysms (SAAs) inpatients with portal hypertension. It is indicated when the SAA diameter reaches 20 mm. Although endovascular techniques are effective and safe for the treatment of medium-sized SAAs, little is known about their applicability to large-sized SAAs. Herein, we report a case of giant SAA, which was treated with transcatheter coil embolization. The case was not considered suitable for surgery because of the presence of severe portal hypertension. The procedure was complicated by bacterial infection of the coils within the aneurismatic sac, leading to the development of hepatic failure. A liver transplant was then successfully performed despite the presence of a nonresponsive infection.
Symptomatic calcified splenic artery aneurysm: Case report  [PDF]
?olovi? Radoje,?olovi? Nata?a,Grubor Nikica,Kaitovi? Marko
Srpski Arhiv za Celokupno Lekarstvo , 2010, DOI: 10.2298/sarh1012760c
Abstract: Introduction. Although the third most common aneurysm within the abdomen, after aneurysms of the aorta and iliac arteries, splenic artery aneurysms are rare, but not exceptionally. Owing to new imaging techniques, they have been discovered with increasing frequency. Case Outline. Authors present a 47-year-old woman, multipara, who presented with left upper abdominal pain in whom X-ray showed a calcified ring in the area of distal pancreas. Selective angiography confirmed a splenic artery aneurysm of its proximal part. During an open surgery the aneurysm was excised (aneurismectomy) without immediate, early or late complications. The patient became symptom-free. Conclusion. In patients, particularly women, the multiparas who present with epigastric or left upper abdominal pain of unknown aetiology, splenic artery aneurysm has to be taken into account. Further diagnostic procedures such as plain X-ray and selective angiography in suspected cases should be performed. Surgery or other treatment modalities are to be seriously considered in all patients, particularly in those with increased risk of rupture.
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