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Clinimetric properties of the Turkish translation of a modified neck disability index
Nur Kesiktas, Emel Ozcan, Howard Vernon
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-13-25
Abstract: The modified NDI was applied to 30 patients for reliability. 185 patients participated in the validity study. All patients were recruited from the outpatient clinic of our department. The scale was translated by the forward and backward translation procedure according to the COSMIN criteria. The test was repeated at 48 hours interval for reliability study. SPSS-10.0, software was used for statistical analyses. The Intraclass correlation coefficient was used for the test- retest reliability of the modified NDI. Cronbach α was used for internal consistency. Factor analysis was used for construct validity. The validity of the modified NDI with respect to the SF-36, HAD, VAS pain, VAS disability was assessed using Spearman correlations.The Intraclass correlation coefficient between first and second (within 48 hours) evaluation of test (rs) was 0.92. Questions 1,4,6,8,10 were shown to have excellent reliability. (rs > 0.9). Question 10 was the most frequently challenged question because "recreational and social activities" do not have not the same meanings in Turkey than in western countries. This required that detailed explanations be provided by the investigators. Cronbach's alpha for the total index was 0.88. A single factor accounting for 80.2% of the variance was obtained. Validity studies demonstrated good and moderate correlations (rs) among NDI, HAD, VAS, physical function subtitle of SF 36 (0.62, 0.76, 0.68).The modified NDI-Turkish version is a reliable and valid test and is suitable for daily practise.Neck pain is a common condition [1-8]. It becomes chronic at the rate of 30-50%, thus representing one of the most important reasons of disability and workforce loss [3,4,6,8]. Neck pain has been shown to affect a person's activities of daily living [9-14]. Chronic neck pain results in greatly increased treatment costs and as well as decreases in work capacity. As such, it is important in the early diagnosis and follow-up of neck pain to assess a patient's level
Ischemic stroke: Motor impairment and disability with relation to age and lesion location  [cached]
Ferhan SOYUER,Ali SOYUER
Journal of Neurological Sciences , 2005,
Abstract: --------------------------------------------------------------------------------Objectives: To describe the association between motor impairment and disability and to establish the relation to age, and hemisphere of stroke in ischemic stroke.Methods: A total of 100 patients with ischemic stroke were assessed at Erciyes University Neurology Department. The Rivermead Motor Assessment (RMA) was used to measure motor impairment and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) was used to measure disability. The assessments were made poststroke in 7-10 days and 3 months.Results: RMA correlated significantly with FIM for both 7-10 days and 3 months. Motor impairment and disability were not related with age and istatistically between both hemispheres there was no significant difference in either motor impairment or disability.Conclusions: Stroke-related motor impairment and disability are significantly correlated with each other. Despite some inconsistencies in existing literature, our study showed that age and lesion location had no effect in motor impairment and disability assessments.--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Teaching Motor Disability Assessment over the Web: MODASPECTRA  [cached]
Salvatore Valenti,Sandro Fioretti,Maurizio Maurizi,Maurizio Panti
Educational Technology & Society , 2002,
Abstract: MODASPECTRA (MOtor Disability Assessment SPEcialists TRAining) was a research and technology development project aimed at developing quality teaching and training of post-graduate specialists in Motor Disability Assessment. The specialists targeted come from a background of physiatry, physical therapy and bioengineering. The aim is to offer to the European professionals involved in Motor Disability Assessment both a complete degree and a number of courses on Clinical Applications of Movement Analysis in a Life Long Learning context as a mean for upgrading their skills in the line of good practice dissemination and standardisation. The outcome of the project is a Web-based Open and Distance Learning system usable by students, according to suitable tutoring pathways and schedules. The project also implemented multimedia databases of context-based experiences provided by recognised practitioners. These results have been obtained through co-operation among academic and industrial actors for the production of course materials and for the exploitation and adaptation of the remote delivery system. The results of the project and the MODASPECTRA system are available at http://www.modaspectra.org.
Fine motor deficits in reading disability and language impairment: same or different?  [PDF]
Dorothy V Bishop,Sarah McDonald,David McDonald,Annie Brookman
PeerJ , 2015, DOI: 10.7287/peerj.preprints.77v1
Abstract: Several studies have found evidence of motor deficits in poor readers. There is no obvious reason for motor and literacy skills to go together, and it has been suggested that both deficits could be indicative of an underlying problem with cerebellar function and/or procedural learning. However, the picture is complicated by the fact that reading problems often co-occur with oral language impairments, which have also been linked with motor deficits. This raises the question of whether motor deficits characterise poor readers when language impairment has been accounted for – and vice versa. We considered these questions by assessing motor deficits associated with reading disability (RD) and language impairment (LI). A large community sample provided a subset of 9- to 10-year-olds, selected to oversample children with reading and/or language difficulties, to give 37 children with comorbid LI+RD, 67 children with RD only, 32 children with LI only, and 117 typically-developing (TD) children with neither type of difficulty. These children were given four motor tasks that taxed speed, sequence, and imitation abilities to differing extents. Different patterns of results were found for the four motor tasks. There was no effect of RD or LI on two speeded fingertip tapping tasks, one of which involved sequencing of movements. LI, but not RD, was associated with problems in imitating hand positions and slowed performance on a speeded peg-moving task that required a precision grip. Fine motor deficits in poor readers may be more a function of language impairment than literacy problems.
Fine motor deficits in reading disability and language impairment: same or different?  [PDF]
Annie Brookman,Sarah McDonald,David McDonald,Dorothy V.M. Bishop
PeerJ , 2015, DOI: 10.7717/peerj.217
Abstract: Several studies have found evidence of motor deficits in poor readers. There is no obvious reason for motor and literacy skills to go together, and it has been suggested that both deficits could be indicative of an underlying problem with cerebellar function and/or procedural learning. However, the picture is complicated by the fact that reading problems often co-occur with oral language impairments, which have also been linked with motor deficits. This raises the question of whether motor deficits characterise poor readers when language impairment has been accounted for – and vice versa. We considered these questions by assessing motor deficits associated with reading disability (RD) and language impairment (LI). A large community sample provided a subset of 9- to 10-year-olds, selected to oversample children with reading and/or language difficulties, to give 37 children with comorbid LI + RD, 67 children with RD only, 32 children with LI only, and 117 typically-developing (TD) children with neither type of difficulty. These children were given four motor tasks that taxed speed, sequence, and imitation abilities to differing extents. Different patterns of results were found for the four motor tasks. There was no effect of RD or LI on two speeded fingertip tapping tasks, one of which involved sequencing of movements. LI, but not RD, was associated with problems in imitating hand positions and slowed performance on a speeded peg-moving task that required a precision grip. Fine motor deficits in poor readers may be more a function of language impairment than literacy problems.
Finger Tapping Clinimetric Score Prediction in Parkinson's Disease Using Low-Cost Accelerometers  [PDF]
Julien Stamatakis,Jérome Ambroise,Julien Crémers,Hoda Sharei,Valérie Delvaux,Benoit Macq,Ga?tan Garraux
Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience , 2013, DOI: 10.1155/2013/717853
Abstract: The motor clinical hallmarks of Parkinson's disease (PD) are usually quantified by physicians using validated clinimetric scales such as the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (MDS-UPDRS). However, clinical ratings are prone to subjectivity and inter-rater variability. The PD medical community is therefore looking for a simple, inexpensive, and objective rating method. As a first step towards this goal, a triaxial accelerometer-based system was used in a sample of 36 PD patients and 10 age-matched controls as they performed the MDS-UPDRS finger tapping (FT) task. First, raw signals were epoched to isolate the successive single FT movements. Next, eighteen FT task movement features were extracted, depicting MDS-UPDRS features and accelerometer specific features. An ordinal logistic regression model and a greedy backward algorithm were used to identify the most relevant features in the prediction of MDS-UPDRS FT scores, given by 3 specialists in movement disorders (SMDs). The Goodman-Kruskal Gamma index obtained (0.961), depicting the predictive performance of the model, is similar to those obtained between the individual scores given by the SMD (0.870 to 0.970). The automatic prediction of MDS-UPDRS scores using the proposed system may be valuable in clinical trials designed to evaluate and modify motor disability in PD patients. 1. Introduction The most important functional disturbance in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), a chronic neurodegenerative condition, is a disorder of voluntary movement prominently characterized by slowness. This phenomenon is generally called bradykinesia [1]. Tremor and muscle rigidity are also part of the motor phenotypic spectrum [2]. Although it has not been possible to define a single underlying pathophysiologic mechanism that explains everything, bradykinesia and other motor symptoms seem to be related to a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra [2, 3]. Since decades, the medical community has been developing clinical tools such as rating scales to quantify the severity of motor and other symptoms in PD. Despite the various attempts to use instruments and devices for quantification, clinical scales remain the preferred method because they are easy to administer and widely available. In the late eighties, the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) was proposed as the primary international rating scale for PD clinical care and research and is still anchored in the daily practice of MDs. The motor examination part of the UPDRS requires the Specialists in Movement Disorders
Assessment scales in stroke: clinimetric and clinical considerations  [cached]
Harrison JK,McArthur KS,Quinn TJ
Clinical Interventions in Aging , 2013,
Abstract: Jennifer K Harrison,1 Katherine S McArthur,2 Terence J Quinn21Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 2Institute of Cardiovascular and Medical Sciences, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, UKAbstract: As stroke care has developed, there has been a need to robustly assess the efficacy of interventions both at the level of the individual stroke survivor and in the context of clinical trials. To describe stroke-survivor recovery meaningfully, more sophisticated measures are required than simple dichotomous end points, such as mortality or stroke recurrence. As stroke is an exemplar disabling long-term condition, measures of function are well suited as outcome assessment. In this review, we will describe functional assessment scales in stroke, concentrating on three of the more commonly used tools: the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, the modified Rankin Scale, and the Barthel Index. We will discuss the strengths, limitations, and application of these scales and use the scales to highlight important properties that are relevant to all assessment tools. We will frame much of this discussion in the context of "clinimetric" analysis. As they are increasingly used to inform stroke-survivor assessments, we will also discuss some of the commonly used quality-of-life measures. A recurring theme when considering functional assessment is that no tool suits all situations. Clinicians and researchers should chose their assessment tool based on the question of interest and the evidence base around clinimetric properties.Keywords: Barthel Index, clinimetrics, clinical trial, disability, methodology, modified Rankin Scale, National Institutes Health Stroke Scale, scales, stroke, outcomes
An epidemiological study on anemia among institutionalized people with intellectual and/or motor disability with special reference to its frequency, severity and predictors
Hiroko Ohwada, Takeo Nakayama, Nobuo Nara, Yuji Tomono, Keiko Yamanaka
BMC Public Health , 2006, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2458-6-85
Abstract: We conducted a cross-sectional study at a public facility for people with intellectual and/or motor disability in Ibaraki prefecture, Japan. Health checkup data obtained in 2001 from 477 people with intellectual disability (male: 286, average age 40.6 ± 12.3; female: 191, average age 45.1 ± 11.6) were retrospectively reviewed.The prevalence of anemia among male participants was higher than in female participants for each disability category (intellectual disability, 41.1%, 4.2%; cerebral palsy, 37.5%, 4.8%; Down's syndrome, 15.0%, 0%; severe motor and intellectual disabilities, 61.9%, 16.7%). Most participants with anemia (93.8 – 100%) showed a normocytic normochromic anemia pattern. Multivariate analysis revealed that factors related to an increase in frequency included sex (male), low body mass index (BMI), use of anticonvulsants or major tranquilizers, and a high zinc sulfate turbidity test (ZTT) value. No clinically diagnosed co-morbid condition was found to be related to the presence of anemia.A high frequency of mild normocytic normochromic anemia in institutionalized people with intellectual and/or motor disability was observed, particularly among males. Medications and chronic inflammation may increase the risk of anemia.The 1992 American Association on Mental Retardation's (AAMR) definition and classification of mental retardation differs from the previous classification system in that: (a) a single diagnostic code of mental retardation is used if the individual meets the three criteria of age of onset (18 or under), significantly sub-average abilities in intellectual functioning, and related limitations in two or more adaptive skills areas; (b) the individual's strengths and weaknesses are described in reference to four dimensions: intellectual functioning and adaptive skills; psychological and emotional well-being; health, physical well-being, and etiology; and life activity environments; and (c) a profile of required support is developed across the four
Clinimetric Testing in Mexican Elders: Associations with Age, Gender, and Place of Residence  [PDF]
Lorena Tavano-Colaizzi,Alvar Loria,Mario Ulises Pérez-Zepeda
Frontiers in Medicine , 2014, DOI: 10.3389/fmed.2014.00036
Abstract: Aim: To evaluate the ability of five clinimetric instruments to discriminate between subjects >60 years of age living at home versus those living in a residency.
The clinimetric qualities of patient-assessed instruments for measuring chronic ankle instability: A systematic review
Christophe Eechaute, Peter Vaes, Lieve Van Aerschot, Sara Asman, William Duquet
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2474-8-6
Abstract: A computerized literature search of Medline, Embase, Cinahl, Web of Science, Sport Discus and the Cochrane Controlled Trial Register was performed to identify eligible instruments. Two reviewers independently evaluated the clinimetric qualities of the selected instruments using a criteria list. The inter-observer reliability of both the selection procedure and the clinimetric evaluation was calculated using modified kappa coefficients.The inter-observer reliability of the selection procedure was excellent (k = .86). Four instruments met the eligibility criteria: the Ankle Joint Functional Assessment Tool (AJFAT), the Functional Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and the Functional Ankle Ability Measure (FAAM). The inter-observer reliability of the quality assessment was substantial to excellent (k between .64 and .88). Test-retest reliability was demonstrated for the FAOS, the FADI and the FAAM but not for the AJFAT. The FAOS and the FAAM met the criteria for content validity and construct validity. For none of the studied instruments, the internal consistency was sufficiently demonstrated. The presence of floor- and ceiling effects was assessed for the FAOS but ceiling effects were present for all subscales. Responsiveness was demonstrated for the AJFAT, FADI and the FAAM. Only for the FAAM, a minimal clinical important difference (MCID) was presented.The FADI and the FAAM can be considered as the most appropriate, patient-assessed tools to quantify functional disabilities in patients with chronic ankle instability. The clinimetric qualities of the FAAM need to be further demonstrated in a specific population of patients with chronic ankle instability.Lateral ankle sprains are very common sports related ankle injuries. Recurrence rates of ankle sprains of 19% to 70% have been reported [1,2]. Nineteen to 72% of individuals who sustain a lateral ankle sprain have been reported to have residual symptoms and/or develop chronic ankle
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