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Determinants of Suicide and Accidental or Violent Death in the Australian HIV Observational Database  [PDF]
Hamish McManus, Kathy Petoumenos, Teo Franic, Mark D. Kelly, Jo Watson, Catherine C. O’Connor, Mark Jeanes, Jennifer Hoy, David A. Cooper, Matthew G. Law, on behalf of the Australian HIV Observational Database
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0089089
Abstract: Background Rates of suicide and accidental or violent death remain high in HIV-positive populations despite significantly improved prognosis since the introduction of cART. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study of suicide and accidental or violent death in the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD) between January 1999 and March 2012. For each case, 2 controls were matched by clinic, age, sex, mode of exposure and HIV-positive date to adjust for potential confounding by these covariates. Risk of suicide and accidental or violent death was estimated using conditional logistic regression. Results We included 27 cases (17 suicide and 10 violent/accidental death) and 54 controls. All cases were men who have sex with men (MSM) or MSM/ injecting drug use (IDU) mode of exposure. Increased risk was associated with unemployment (Odds Ratio (OR) 5.86, 95% CI: 1.69–20.37), living alone (OR 3.26, 95% CI: 1.06–10.07), suicidal ideation (OR 6.55, 95% CI: 1.70–25.21), and >2 psychiatric/cognitive risk factors (OR 4.99, 95% CI: 1.17–30.65). CD4 cell count of >500 cells/μL (OR 0.25, 95% CI: 0.07–0.87) and HIV-positive date ≥1990 (1990–1999 (OR 0.31, 95% CI: 0.11–0.89), post-2000 (OR 0.08, 95% CI: 0.01–0.84)) were associated with decreased risk. CD4 cell count ≥500 cells/μL remained a significant predictor of reduced risk (OR 0.15, 95% CI: 0.03–0.70) in a multivariate model adjusted for employment status, accommodation status and HIV-positive date. Conclusions After adjustment for psychosocial factors, the immunological status of HIV-positive patients contributed to the risk of suicide and accidental or violent death. The number of psychiatric/cognitive diagnoses contributed to the level of risk but many psychosocial factors were not individually significant. These findings indicate a complex interplay of factors associated with risk of suicide and accidental or violent death.
Clinical Predictors of Immune Reconstitution following Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Patients from the Australian HIV Observational Database  [PDF]
Reena Rajasuriar, Maelenn Gouillou, Tim Spelman, Tim Read, Jennifer Hoy, Matthew Law, Paul U. Cameron, Kathy Petoumenos, Sharon R. Lewin
PLOS ONE , 2011, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0020713
Abstract: Background A small but significant number of patients do not achieve CD4 T-cell counts >500cells/μl despite years of suppressive cART. These patients remain at risk of AIDS and non-AIDS defining illnesses. The aim of this study was to identify clinical factors associated with CD4 T-cell recovery following long-term cART. Methods Patients with the following inclusion criteria were selected from the Australian HIV Observational Database (AHOD): cART as their first regimen initiated at CD4 T-cell count <500cells/μl, HIV RNA<500copies/ml after 6 months of cART and sustained for at least 12 months. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to identify determinants associated with time to achieve CD4 T-cell counts >500cells/μl and >200cells/μl. Results 501 patients were eligible for inclusion from AHOD (n = 2853). The median (IQR) age and baseline CD4 T-cell counts were 39 (32–47) years and 236 (130–350) cells/μl, respectively. A major strength of this study is the long follow-up duration, median (IQR) = 6.5(3–10) years. Most patients (80%) achieved CD4 T-cell counts >500cells/μl, but in 8%, this took >5 years. Among the patients who failed to reach a CD4 T-cell count >500cells/μl, 16% received cART for >10 years. In a multivariate analysis, faster time to achieve a CD4 T-cell count >500cells/μl was associated with higher baseline CD4 T-cell counts (p<0.001), younger age (p = 0.019) and treatment initiation with a protease inhibitor (PI)-based regimen (vs. non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor, NNRTI; p = 0.043). Factors associated with achieving CD4 T-cell counts >200cells/μl included higher baseline CD4 T-cell count (p<0.001), not having a prior AIDS-defining illness (p = 0.018) and higher baseline HIV RNA (p<0.001). Conclusion The time taken to achieve a CD4 T-cell count >500cells/μl despite long-term cART is prolonged in a subset of patients in AHOD. Starting cART early with a PI-based regimen (vs. NNRTI-based regimen) is associated with more rapid recovery of a CD4 T-cell count >500cells/μl.
Cancers in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD): a retrospective analysis of risk factors
Petoumenos Kathy,Hui Eugenie,Kumarasamy Nagalingeswaran,Kerr Stephen J
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1758-2652-13-51
Abstract: Background This retrospective survey describes types of cancers diagnosed in HIV-infected subjects in Asia, and assesses risk factors for cancer in HIV-infected subjects using contemporaneous HIV-infected controls without cancer. Methods TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD) sites retrospectively reviewed clinic medical records to determine cancer diagnoses since 2000. For each diagnosis, the following data were recorded: date, type, stage, method of diagnosis, demographic data, medical history, and HIV-related information. For risk factor analyses, two HIV-infected control subjects without cancer diagnoses were also selected. Cancers were grouped as AIDS-defining cancers (ADCs), and non-ADCs. Non-ADCs were further categorized as being infection related (NADC-IR) and unrelated (NADC-IUR). Results A total of 617 patients were included in this study: 215 cancer cases and 402 controls from 13 sites. The majority of cancer cases were male (71%). The mean age (SD) for cases was 39 (10.6), 46 (11.5) and 44 (13.7) for ADCs, NADC-IURs and NADCs-IR, respectively. The majority (66%) of cancers were ADCs (16% Kaposi sarcoma, 40% non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, and 9% cervical cancer). The most common NADCs were lung (6%), breast (5%) and hepatocellular carcinoma and Hodgkin's lymphoma (2% each). There were also three (1.4%) cases of leiomyosarcoma reported in this study. In multivariate analyses, individuals with CD4 counts above 200 cells/mm3 were approximately 80% less likely to be diagnosed with an ADC (p < 0.001). Older age (OR: 1.39, p = 0.001) and currently not receiving antiretroviral treatment (OR: 0.29, p = 0.006) were independent predictors of NADCs overall, and similarly for NADCs-IUR. Lower CD4 cell count and higher CDC stage (p = 0.041) were the only independent predictors of NADCs-IR. Conclusions The spectrum of cancer diagnoses in the Asia region currently does not appear dissimilar to that observed in non-Asian HIV populations. One interesting finding was the cases of leiomyosarcoma, a smooth-muscle tumour, usually seen in children and young adults with AIDS, yet overall quite rare. Further detailed studies are required to better describe the range of cancers in this region, and to help guide the development of screening programmes.
Failure to prescribe pneumocystis prophylaxis is associated with increased mortality, even in the cART era: results from the Treat Asia HIV observational database
Lim Poh-Lian,Zhou Jialun,Ditangco Rossana A,Law Matthew G
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1758-2652-15-1
Abstract: Background Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) prophylaxis is recommended for patients with CD4 counts of less than 200 cells/mm3. This study examines the proportion of patients in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD) receiving PCP prophylaxis, and its effect on PCP and mortality. Methods TAHOD patients with prospective follow up had data extracted for prophylaxis using co-trimoxazole, dapsone or pentamidine. The proportion of patients on prophylaxis was calculated for each calendar year since 2003 among patients with CD4 counts of less than 200 cells/mm3. The effect of prophylaxis on PCP and survival were assessed using random-effect Poisson regression models. Results There were a total of 4050 patients on prospective follow up, and 90% of them were receiving combination antiretroviral therapy. Of those with CD4 counts of less than 200 cells/mm3, 58% to 72% in any given year received PCP prophylaxis, predominantly co-trimoxazole. During follow up, 62 patients developed PCP (0.5 per 100 person-years) and 169 died from all causes (1.36/100 person-years). After stratifying by site and adjusting for age, CD4 count, CDC stage and antiretroviral treatment, those without prophylaxis had no higher risk of PCP, but had a significantly higher risk of death (incident rate ratio 10.8, p < 0.001). PCP prophylaxis had greatest absolute benefit in patients with CD4 counts of less than 50 cells/mm3, lowering mortality rates from 33.5 to 6.3 per 100 person-years. Conclusions Approximately two-thirds of TAHOD patients with CD4 counts of less than 200 cells/mm3 received PCP prophylaxis. Patients without prophylaxis had significantly higher mortality, even in the era of combination ART. Although PCP may be under-diagnosed, these data suggest that prophylaxis is associated with important survival benefits.
Trends in detectable viral load by calendar year in the Australian HIV observational database
Law Matthew G,Woolley Ian,Templeton David J,Roth Norm
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1758-2652-14-10
Abstract: Background Recent papers have suggested that expanded combination antiretroviral treatment (cART) through lower viral load may be a strategy to reduce HIV transmission at a population level. We assessed calendar trends in detectable viral load in patients recruited to the Australian HIV Observational Database who were receiving cART. Methods Patients were included in analyses if they had started cART (defined as three or more antiretrovirals) and had at least one viral load assessment after 1 January 1997. We analyzed detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) in the first and second six months of each calendar year while receiving cART. Repeated measures logistic regression methods were used to account for within and between patient variability. Rates of detectable viral load were predicted allowing for patients lost to follow up. Results Analyses were based on 2439 patients and 31,339 viral load assessments between 1 January 1997 and 31 March 2009. Observed detectable viral load in patients receiving cART declined to 5.3% in the first half of 2009. Predicted detectable viral load based on multivariate models, allowing for patient loss to follow up, also declined over time, but at higher levels, to 13.8% in 2009. Conclusions Predicted detectable viral load in Australian HIV Observational Database patients receiving cART declined over calendar time, albeit at higher levels than observed. However, over this period, HIV diagnoses and estimated HIV incidence increased in Australia.
Impact of drug classes and treatment availability on the rate of antiretroviral treatment change in the TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database (TAHOD)
Preeyaporn Srasuebkul, Alexandra Calmy, Jialun Zhou, Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, Matthew Law, Poh Lim, The TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database
AIDS Research and Therapy , 2007, DOI: 10.1186/1742-6405-4-18
Abstract: Rates of ART changes were examined in patients who started first line triple or more ART combination in TAHOD, and had at least one follow-up visit. Rates of ART changes were summarised per follow-up year, and factors associated with changes assessed using random-effect Poisson regression. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine durations of patients in their first, second and third regimen.A total of 1846 patients initiated an ART combination with at least three drugs. Median follow up time for the first treatment was 3.2 years. The overall rate of ART change was 29 per 100-person-year.In univariate analyses, rate of treatment change was significantly associated with exposure category, the country income category, the drug class combination, calendar year and the number of combinations. In multivariate analysis, compared to d4T/3TC/NVP, starting ART with another NNRTI-containing regimen, with PI only or with a triple NRTI regimen was associated with a higher risk of combination change (relative risk (RR) 1.6 (95% CI 1.64 – 1.96), p < 0.001, RR 3.39 (2.76 – 4.16) p < 0.001, RR 6.37 (4.51 – 9.00), p < 0.001). Being on a second or a third combination regimen was also associated with a decreased rate of ART change, compared with first ART combination (RR 0.82 (0.68 – 0.99), p = 0.035, RR 0.77 (0.61 – 0.97), p = 0.024). Sites with fewer than 12 drugs used had an increased rate of treatment changes (1.31 (1.13 – 1.51), p < 0.001). Injecting drug users, and other/unknown exposure was found to increase rate of treatment change (1.24 (1.00 – 1.54), p = 0.055). Percentages of patients who stopped treatment due to adverse events were 31, 27 and 32 in 1st, 2nd and 3rd treatment combinations, respectively.Our study suggests that drug availability impacts on ART prescription patterns. Our data, reflecting real clinic use in Asia, suggest that around half of all patients require second combination ART by 3 years after treatment initiation.In South and South-East Asia the nu
Risk and prognostic significance of tuberculosis in patients from The TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database
Jialun Zhou, Julian Elliott, Patrick CK Li, Poh Lim, Sasisopin Kiertiburanakul, Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, Tuti Merati, Sanjay Pujari, Yi-Ming A Chen, Praphan Phanuphak, Saphonn Vonthanak, Thira Sirisanthana, Somnuek Sungkanuparph, Christopher KC Lee, Adeeba Kamarulzaman, Shinichi Oka, Fujie Zhang, Goa Tau, Rossana Ditangco
BMC Infectious Diseases , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-9-46
Abstract: The risk of TB diagnosis after recruitment was assessed in patients with prospective follow-up. TB diagnosis was fitted as a time-dependent variable in assessing overall survival.At baseline, 22% of patients were diagnosed with TB. TB incidence was 1.98 per 100 person-years during follow up, with predictors including younger age, lower recent CD4 count, duration of antiretroviral treatment, and living in high TB burden countries. Among 3279 patients during 6968 person-years, 142 died (2.04 per 100 person-years). Compared to patients with CDC category A or B illness only, mortality was marginally higher in patients with single Non-TB AIDS defining illness (ADI), or TB only (adjusted HR 1.35, p = 0.173) and highest in patients with multiple non-TB AIDS or both TB and other ADI (adjusted HR 2.21, p < 0.001).The risk of TB diagnosis was associated with increasing immunodeficiency and partly reduced by antiretroviral treatment. The prognosis of developing TB appeared to be similar to that following a diagnosis of other non-TB ADI.The use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has led to dramatic reductions in morbidity and mortality in HIV patients [1,2]. However, tuberculosis (TB) remains a common opportunistic infections and a major cause of death among patients with HIV, especially in sub-Saharan African and Asian countries [3-5], where there is a high background prevalence of TB [5-7].The risk of TB in HIV-infected patients and the impact of TB diagnosis on disease progression in HIV infected patients have been well described in Africa [3,8-10]. The Asia-Pacific region has a large burden of both tuberculosis [7], with nearly 5 million prevalent cases and over 3 million new cases in 2006, and HIV, with an estimated 5 million people living with HIV and 380,000 new infections occurring in 2007 [11]. It is estimated that 2.5 million people are living with both infections in the region [5]. Despite the importance of these inter-related epidemics in the region, fe
Quality of data collection in a large HIV observational clinic database in sub-Saharan Africa: implications for clinical research and audit of care
Kiragga Agnes N,Castelnuovo Barbara,Schaefer Petra,Muwonge Timothy
Journal of the International AIDS Society , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1758-2652-14-3
Abstract: Background Observational HIV clinic databases are now widely used to answer key questions related to HIV care and treatment, but there has been no systematic evaluation of their quality of data. Our objective was to evaluate the completeness and accuracy of recording of key data HIV items in a large routine observational HIV clinic database. Methods We looked at the number and rate of opportunistic infections (OIs) per 100 person years at risk in the 24 months following antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation in 559 patients who initiated ART in 2004-2005 and enrolled into a research cohort. We compared this with data in a routine clinic database for the same 559 patients, and a further 1233 patients who initiated ART in the same period. The Research Cohort database was considered as the reference "gold standard" for the assessment of data accuracy. A crude percentage of underreporting of OIs in the clinic database was calculated based on the difference between the OI rates reported in both databases. We reviewed 100 clinic patient medical records to assess the accuracy of recording of key data items of OIs, ART toxicities and ART regimen changes. Results The overall incidence rate per 100 person years at risk for the initial OI in the 559 patients in the research cohort and clinic databases was 24.1 (95% CI: 20.5-28.2) and 13.2 (95% CI: 10.8-16.2) respectively, and 10.4 (95% CI: 9.1-11.9) for the 1233 clinic patients. This represents a 1.8- and 2.3-fold higher rate of events in the research cohort database compared with the same 599 patients and 1233 patients in the routine clinic database, or a 45.1% and 56.8% rate of underreporting, respectively. The combined error rate of missing and incorrect items from the medical records' review was 67% for OIs, 52% for ART-related toxicities, and 83% and 58% for ART discontinuation and modification, respectively. Conclusions There is a high rate of underreporting of OIs in a routine HIV clinic database. This has important implications for the use and interpretation of routine observational databases for research and audit, and highlights the need for regular data validation of these databases.
Modeling Latently Infected Cell Activation: Viral and Latent Reservoir Persistence, and Viral Blips in HIV-infected Patients on Potent Therapy  [PDF]
Libin Rong,Alan S. Perelson
PLOS Computational Biology , 2009, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pcbi.1000533
Abstract: Although potent combination therapy is usually able to suppress plasma viral loads in HIV-1 patients to below the detection limit of conventional clinical assays, a low level of viremia frequently can be detected in plasma by more sensitive assays. Additionally, many patients experience transient episodes of viremia above the detection limit, termed viral blips, even after being on highly suppressive therapy for many years. An obstacle to viral eradication is the persistence of a latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4+ T cells. The mechanisms underlying low viral load persistence, slow decay of the latent reservoir, and intermittent viral blips are not fully characterized. The quantitative contributions of residual viral replication to viral and the latent reservoir persistence remain unclear. In this paper, we probe these issues by developing a mathematical model that considers latently infected cell activation in response to stochastic antigenic stimulation. We demonstrate that programmed expansion and contraction of latently infected cells upon immune activation can generate both low-level persistent viremia and intermittent viral blips. Also, a small fraction of activated T cells revert to latency, providing a potential to replenish the latent reservoir. By this means, occasional activation of latently infected cells can explain the variable decay characteristics of the latent reservoir observed in different clinical studies. Finally, we propose a phenomenological model that includes a logistic term representing homeostatic proliferation of latently infected cells. The model is simple but can robustly generate the multiphasic viral decline seen after initiation of therapy, as well as low-level persistent viremia and intermittent HIV-1 blips. Using these models, we provide a quantitative and integrated prospective into the long-term dynamics of HIV-1 and the latent reservoir in the setting of potent antiretroviral therapy.
Trends in CD4 counts in HIV-infected patients with HIV viral load monitoring while on combination antiretroviral treatment: results from The TREAT Asia HIV Observational Database
Jialun Zhou, Thira Sirisanthana, Sasisopin Kiertiburanakul, Yi-Ming A Chen, Ning Han, Poh_Lian Lim, Nagalingeswaran Kumarasamy, Jun Choi, Tuti Merati, Evy Yunihastuti, Shinichi Oka, Adeeba Kamarulzaman, Praphan Phanuphak, Christopher KC Lee, Patrick CK Li, Sanjay Pujari, Vanthanak Saphonn, Matthew G Law
BMC Infectious Diseases , 2010, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2334-10-361
Abstract: Treatment-naive HIV-infected patients who started cART with three or more and had three or more CD4 count and HIV VL tests were included. CD4 count slopes were expressed as changes of cells per microliter per year. Predictors of CD4 count slopes from 6 months after initiation were assessed by random-effects linear regression models.A total of 1676 patients (74% male) were included. The median time on cART was 4.2 years (IQR 2.5-5.8 years). In the final model, CD4 count slope was associated with age, concurrent HIV VL and CD4 count, disease stage, hepatitis B or C co-infection, and time since cART initiation. CD4 count continues to increase with HIV VL up to 20 000 copies/mL during 6-12 months after cART initiation. However, the HIV VL has to be controlled below 5 000, 4 000 and 500 copies/mL for the CD4 count slope to remain above 20 cells/microliter per year during 12-18, 18-24, and beyond 24 months after cART initiation.After cART initiation, CD4 counts continued to increase even when the concurrent HIV VL was detectable. However, HIV VL needed to be controlled at a lower level to maintain a positive CD4 count slope when cART continues. The effect on long-term outcomes through the possible development of HIV drug resistance remains uncertain.Studies show that latent infection of CD4 cells provides a mechanism for lifelong persistence of HIV-1, even in patients on effective anti-retroviral therapy [1]. To suppress viral replication so that the VL is below the level of detection with standard assays is thus one of the aims at the start of antiretroviral treatment. Maximal and durable suppression of HIV VL prevents or delays development of drug resistant mutations, preserves CD4 cells, and eventually results in better clinical outcomes. According to the US guidelines, if HIV VL suppression is not achieved, it is necessary to change to a new regimen, a second or third line regimen, with at least two active drugs [2].HIV-infected patients in most developing countries h
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