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Acute acalculous cholecystitis secondary to dengue fever.  [cached]
Farah HISAMONIE KOH,Hartini MISLI,Vui Heng CHONG
Brunei International Medical Journal , 2011,
Abstract: Patients with dengue fever usually present with typical symptoms such as fever, frontal headache, retro-ocular pain, myalgia, arthralgia, nausea, vomiting, rash, leucopaenia and thrombocytopaenia. However, they can also manifest with atypical symptoms. Acute acalculous cholecystitis is an atypical manifestation of dengue fever. In dengue endemic areas such as Brunei Darussalam, it is imperative that typical and atypical presentations of dengue fever are recognised so that early diagnosis can be made. We report a case of an 18-year-old Malay lady who presented with fever, cough, abdominal pain, and generalised myalgia. She was found to have acute acalculous cholecystitis secondary to dengue fever.
Dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by pancreatitis
Fontal, Guido Ricardo Gonzalez;Henao-Martinez, Andres Felipe;
Brazilian Journal of Infectious Diseases , 2011, DOI: 10.1590/S1413-86702011000500015
Abstract: acute pancreatitis is an atypical complication of dengue fever and is rarely described. we are reporting a case of dengue hemorrhagic fever complicated by acute pancreatitis in a patient with history of diabetes mellitus type 1 and end stage renal disease on hemodialysis.
Atypical Presentation of Typhoid Fever  [PDF]
Deepak Madi, Basavaprabhu Achappa, John T Ramapuram, Nithyananda Chowta, Mridula Laxman, Soundarya Mahalingam
Asian Journal of Medical Sciences , 2014, DOI: 10.3126/ajms.v5i2.8584
Abstract: The classical presentation of typhoid has changed over the years. Atypical presentation of typhoid is now seen in clinical practice. Entericfever can present with atypical manifestations like abdominal lymphadenopathy, acute acalculous cholecystitis, osteomyelitis, splenic abscess and Pneumonia. Jaundice splenic abscess and thrombocytopenia in a febrile patient in the tropics is commonly due to Malaria, Leptospirosis and Dengue. We report a case of typhoid fever presenting with jaundice and thrombocytopenia. A 17 year old male presented to us with history of fever and jaundice. Investigations revealed thrombocytopenia and conjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Blood culture grew Salmonella Typhi. He was treated with ceftriaxone and he improved. A diagnosis of typhoid fever must be considered in a febrile patient with jaundice and thrombocytopenia in the tropics. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/ajms.v5i2.8584 ? Asian Journal of Medical Science, Volume-5(2) 2014: 140-142
Atypical lymphocytes in malaria mimicking dengue infection in Thailand  [cached]
Polrat Wilairatana,Noppadon Tangpukdee,Sant Muangnoicharoen,et al
Research and Reports in Tropical Medicine , 2010,
Abstract: Polrat Wilairatana1, Noppadon Tangpukdee1, Sant Muangnoicharoen1, Srivicha Krudsood2, Shigeyuki Kano31Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Tropical Medicine and Malaria, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Patients with uncomplicated falciparum or vivax malaria usually present with acute febrile illness and thrombocytopenia similar to dengue infection. We retrospectively studied atypical lymphocytes (AL) and atypical lymphocytosis (ALO, defined as AL > 5% of total white blood cells) in 1310 uncomplicated malaria patients. In 718 falciparum malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 53.2% and 5.7% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–10%), whereas in 592 vivax malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 55.4% and 9.5% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–14%). After antimalarial treatment, AL and ALO declined in both falciparum and vivax malaria. However, AL and ALO remained in falciparum malaria on days 7, 14, and 21, whereas AL and ALO remained in vivax malaria on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. In both falciparum and vivax malaria patients, there was a positive correlation between AL and total lymphocytes, but a negative correlation between AL and highest fever on admission, white blood cells, and neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets (P < 0.05). In conclusion, AL or ALO may be found in uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria mimicking dengue infection. In tropical countries where both dengue and malaria are endemic, presence of AL or ALO in any acute febrile patients with thrombocytopenia (similar to the findings in dengue) malaria could not be excluded. Particularly if the patients have risk of malaria infection, confirmative microscopic examination for malaria should be carried out.Keywords: malaria, dengue, atypical lymphocytes
Dengue Fever (DF) in Pakistan
Fridous Jahan
Asia Pacific Family Medicine , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1447-056x-10-1
Abstract: The World health Organization (WHO) declares dengue and dengue hemorrhagic fever to be endemic in South Asia. WHO currently estimates there may be 50 million dengue infections worldwide every year. In 2007 alone, there were more than 890 000 reported cases of dengue in the Americas, of which 26 000 cases were Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF)[1]. The disease is now endemic in more than 100 countries in Africa, Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean, South-east Asia and the Western Pacific. South-east Asia and the Western Pacific are the most seriously affected.Pakistan is at high risk of being hit by large epidemics because of many over crowded cities, unsafe drinking water, inadequate sanitation, large number of refugees and low vaccination coverage. These conditions promote the spread of infectious diseases and consequently every year a large number of epidemics/outbreaks occur in different parts of the country, which result in increased morbidity and mortality.Dengue virus infection is increasingly recognized as one of the world's emerging infectious diseases. About 50-100 million cases of dengue fever and 500,000 cases of Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever (DHF), resulting in around 24,000 deaths, are reported annually[1].A pandemic of dengue began in Southeast Asia after World War II and has spread around the globe since then. In the 1980 s, DHF began a second expansion into Asia when Sri Lanka, India, and the Maldive Islands had their first major DHF epidemics.Pakistan first reported an epidemic of dengue fever in 1994.The epidemics in Sri Lanka and India were associated with multiple dengue virus serotypes, but DEN-3 was predominant and was genetically distinct from DEN-3 viruses previously isolated from infected persons in those countries. In Asian countries where DHF is endemic, the epidemics have become progressively larger in the last 15 years. In 2005, dengue is the most important mosquito-borne viral disease affecting humans[2].Dengue virus is now endemic in Pakistan,
Dengue fever with acute liver failure  [cached]
Vinodh B,Bammigatti C,Kumar Ashok,Mittal V
Journal of Postgraduate Medicine , 2005,
Abstract: A virus belonging to the Flaviviridae group causes dengue haemorrhagic fever. Dengue presenting as acute liver failure is rare. Dengue is endemic in India. The last epidemic of dengue occurred in Delhi in 2003. During this epidemic, 2185 confirmed cases of dengue were reported. Dengue virus serotypes 2 and 3 were responsible for this epidemic. A 19-yr-old male presented to our hospital with the complaints of fever for 12 days, during this epidemic. He was diagnosed as having dengue shock syndrome, stage IV with acute liver failure. He had primary dengue infection. He made complete recovery with supportive management.
Health Beliefs and Practices Related to Dengue Fever: A Focus Group Study  [PDF]
Li Ping Wong ,Sazaly AbuBakar
PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0002310
Abstract: Background This qualitative study aimed to provide an in-depth understanding of the meaning of dengue fever (DF) amongst people living in a dengue endemic region, dengue prevention and treatment-seeking behaviours. The Health Belief Model was used as a framework to explore and understand dengue prevention behaviours. Methods A total of 14 focus group discussions were conducted with 84 Malaysian citizens of different socio-demographic backgrounds between 16th December, 2011 and 12th May, 2012. Results The study revealed that awareness about DF and prevention measures were high. The pathophysiology of dengue especially dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS) were rarely known; as a result, it was seen as deadly by some but was also perceived as easily curable by others without a basis of understanding. Young adults and elderly participants had a low perception of susceptibility to DF. In general, the low perceived susceptibility emerged as two themes, namely a perceived natural ability to withstand infection and a low risk of being in contact with the dengue virus vector, Aedes spp. mosquitoes. The barriers to sustained self-prevention against dengue prevention that emerged in focus groups were: i) lack of self-efficacy, ii) lack of perceived benefit, iii) low perceived susceptibility, and iv) unsure perceived susceptibility. Low perceived benefit of continued dengue prevention practices was a result of lack of concerted action against dengue in their neighborhood. Traditional medical practices and home remedies were widely perceived and experienced as efficacious in treating DF. Conclusion Behavioural change towards attaining sustainability in dengue preventive practices may be enhanced by fostering comprehensive knowledge of dengue and a change in health beliefs. Wide use of unconventional therapy for DF warrants the need to enlighten the public to limit their reliance on unproven alternative treatments.
Dengue Fever in Perspective of Clustering Algorithms  [PDF]
Kamran Shaukat,Nayyer Masood,Ahmed Bin Shafaat,Kamran Jabbar,Hassan Shabbir,Shakir Shabbir
Computer Science , 2015,
Abstract: Dengue fever is a disease which is transmitted and caused by Aedes Aegypti mosquitos. Dengue has become a serious health issue in all over the world especially in those countries who are situated in tropical or subtropical regions because rain is an important factor for growth and increase in the population of dengue transmitting mosquitos. For a long time, data mining algorithms have been used by the scientists for the diagnosis and prognosis of different diseases which includes dengue as well. This was a study to analyses the attack of dengue fever in different areas of district Jhelum, Pakistan in 2011. As per our knowledge, we are unaware of any kind of research study in the area of district Jhelum for diagnosis or analysis of dengue fever. According to our information, we are the first one researching and analyzing dengue fever in this specific area. Dataset was obtained from the office of Executive District Officer EDO (health) District Jhelum. We applied DBSCAN algorithm for the clustering of dengue fever. First we showed overall behavior of dengue in the district Jhelum. Then we explained dengue fever at tehsil level with the help of geographical pictures. After that we have elaborated comparison of different clustering algorithms with the help of graphs based on our dataset. Those algorithms include k-means, K-mediods, DBSCAN and OPTICS.
A model of dengue fever
M Derouich, A Boutayeb, EH Twizell
BioMedical Engineering OnLine , 2003, DOI: 10.1186/1475-925x-2-4
Abstract: The present paper deals with a succession of two epidemics caused by two different viruses. The dynamics of the disease is studied by a compartmental model involving ordinary differential equations for the human and the mosquito populations.Stability of the equilibrium points is given and a simulation is carried out with different values of the parameters. The epidemic dynamics is discussed and illustration is given by figures for different values of the parameters.The proposed model allows for better understanding of the disease dynamics. Environment and vaccination strategies are discussed especially in the case of the succession of two epidemics with two different viruses.With medical research achievements in terms of vaccination, antibiotics and improvement of life conditions from the second half of the 20th century, it was expected that infectious diseases were going to disappear. Consequently, in developed countries the efforts have been concentrated on illnesses as cancer. However, at the dawn of the new century, infectious diseases are still causing suffering and mortality in developing countries. Malaria, yellow fever, AIDS, Ebola and other names will have marked the memory of humanity forever.Among these diseases, dengue fever, especially known in Southeast Asia, is sweeping the world, hitting countries with tropical and warm climates. It is transmitted to the man by the mosquito of the genus Aedes and exists in two forms: the Dengue Fever (DF) or classic dengue and the Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever (DHF) which may evolve toward a severe form known as Dengue Shock Syndrome (DSS). The major problem with dengue is the fact that the disease is caused by four distinct serotypes known as DEN1, DEN2, DEN3 and DEN4. A person infected by one of the four serotypes will never be infected again by the same serotype (homologus immunity), but he looses immunity to the three other serotypes (heterologus immunity) in about 12 weeks and then becomes more susceptible to develo
Atypical lymphocytes in malaria mimicking dengue infection in Thailand
Polrat Wilairatana, Noppadon Tangpukdee, Sant Muangnoicharoen, et al
Research and Reports in Tropical Medicine , 2010, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRTM.S13038
Abstract: typical lymphocytes in malaria mimicking dengue infection in Thailand Original Research (5316) Total Article Views Authors: Polrat Wilairatana, Noppadon Tangpukdee, Sant Muangnoicharoen, et al Published Date September 2010 Volume 2010:1 Pages 37 - 43 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRTM.S13038 Polrat Wilairatana1, Noppadon Tangpukdee1, Sant Muangnoicharoen1, Srivicha Krudsood2, Shigeyuki Kano3 1Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, 2Department of Tropical Hygiene, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand; 3Department of Tropical Medicine and Malaria, Research Institute, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Patients with uncomplicated falciparum or vivax malaria usually present with acute febrile illness and thrombocytopenia similar to dengue infection. We retrospectively studied atypical lymphocytes (AL) and atypical lymphocytosis (ALO, defined as AL > 5% of total white blood cells) in 1310 uncomplicated malaria patients. In 718 falciparum malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 53.2% and 5.7% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–10%), whereas in 592 vivax malaria patients, AL and ALO on day 0 were found in 55.4% and 9.5% of the patients, respectively, with median AL on admission of 1% (range 0%–14%). After antimalarial treatment, AL and ALO declined in both falciparum and vivax malaria. However, AL and ALO remained in falciparum malaria on days 7, 14, and 21, whereas AL and ALO remained in vivax malaria on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. In both falciparum and vivax malaria patients, there was a positive correlation between AL and total lymphocytes, but a negative correlation between AL and highest fever on admission, white blood cells, and neutrophils, eosinophils, and platelets (P < 0.05). In conclusion, AL or ALO may be found in uncomplicated falciparum and vivax malaria mimicking dengue infection. In tropical countries where both dengue and malaria are endemic, presence of AL or ALO in any acute febrile patients with thrombocytopenia (similar to the findings in dengue) malaria could not be excluded. Particularly if the patients have risk of malaria infection, confirmative microscopic examination for malaria should be carried out.
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