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Genomic Profiling of Submucosal-Invasive Gastric Cancer by Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization  [PDF]
Akiko Kuroda,Yoshiyuki Tsukamoto,Lam Tung Nguyen,Tsuyoshi Noguchi,Ichiro Takeuchi,Masahiro Uchida,Tomohisa Uchida,Naoki Hijiya,Chisato Nakada,Tadayoshi Okimoto,Masaaki Kodama,Kazunari Murakami,Keiko Matsuura,Masao Seto,Hisao Ito,Toshio Fujioka,Masatsugu Moriyama
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0022313
Abstract: Genomic copy number aberrations (CNAs) in gastric cancer have already been extensively characterized by array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) analysis. However, involvement of genomic CNAs in the process of submucosal invasion and lymph node metastasis in early gastric cancer is still poorly understood. In this study, to address this issue, we collected a total of 59 tumor samples from 27 patients with submucosal-invasive gastric cancers (SMGC), analyzed their genomic profiles by array CGH, and compared them between paired samples of mucosal (MU) and submucosal (SM) invasion (23 pairs), and SM invasion and lymph node (LN) metastasis (9 pairs). Initially, we hypothesized that acquisition of specific CNA(s) is important for these processes. However, we observed no significant difference in the number of genomic CNAs between paired MU and SM, and between paired SM and LN. Furthermore, we were unable to find any CNAs specifically associated with SM invasion or LN metastasis. Among the 23 cases analyzed, 15 had some similar pattern of genomic profiling between SM and MU. Interestingly, 13 of the 15 cases also showed some differences in genomic profiles. These results suggest that the majority of SMGCs are composed of heterogeneous subpopulations derived from the same clonal origin. Comparison of genomic CNAs between SMGCs with and without LN metastasis revealed that gain of 11q13, 11q14, 11q22, 14q32 and amplification of 17q21 were more frequent in metastatic SMGCs, suggesting that these CNAs are related to LN metastasis of early gastric cancer. In conclusion, our data suggest that generation of genetically distinct subclones, rather than acquisition of specific CNA at MU, is integral to the process of submucosal invasion, and that subclones that acquire gain of 11q13, 11q14, 11q22, 14q32 or amplification of 17q21 are likely to become metastatic.
Genomic profiling of rectal adenoma and carcinoma by array-based comparative genomic hybridization  [cached]
Shi Zhi-Zhou,Zhang Yue-Ming,Shang Li,Hao Jia-Jie
BMC Medical Genomics , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1755-8794-5-52
Abstract: Background Rectal cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Early detection and early therapy are important for the control of death caused by rectal cancer. The present study aims to investigate the genomic alterations in rectal adenoma and carcinoma. Methods We detected the genomic changes of 8 rectal adenomas and 8 carcinomas using array CGH. Then 14 genes were selected for analyzing the expression between rectal tumor and paracancerous normal tissues as well as from adenoma to carcinoma by real-time PCR. The expression of GPNMB and DIS3 were further investigated in rectal adenoma and carcinoma tissues by immunohistochemistry. Results We indentified ten gains and 22 losses in rectal adenoma, and found 25 gains and 14 losses in carcinoma. Gains of 7p21.3-p15.3, 7q22.3-q32.1, 13q13.1-q14.11, 13q21.1-q32.1, 13q32.2-q34, 20p11.21 and 20q11.23-q12 and losses of 17p13.1-p11.2, 18p11.32-p11.21 and 18q11.1-q11.2 were shared by both rectal adenoma and carcinoma. Gains of 1q, 6p21.33-p21.31 and losses of 10p14-p11.21, 14q12-q21.1, 14q22.1-q24.3, 14q31.3-q32.1, 14q32.2-q32.32, 15q15.1-q21.1, 15q22.31 and 15q25.1-q25.2 were only detected in carcinoma but not in adenoma. Copy number and mRNA expression of EFNA1 increased from rectal adenoma to carcinoma. C13orf27 and PMEPA1 with increased copy number in both adenoma and carcinoma were over expressed in rectal cancer tissues. Protein and mRNA expression of GPNMB was significantly higher in cancer tissues than rectal adenoma tissues. Conclusion Our data may help to identify the driving genes involved in the adenoma-carcinoma progression.
CGI: Java Software for Mapping and Visualizing Data from Array-based Comparative Genomic Hybridization and Expression Profiling
Joyce Xiuweu-Xu Gu,Michael Yang Wei,Pulivarthi H. Rao,Ching C. Lau
Gene Regulation and Systems Biology , 2007,
Abstract: With the increasing application of various genomic technologies in biomedical research, there is a need to integrate these data to correlate candidate genes/regions that are identified by different genomic platforms. Although there are tools that can analyze data from individual platforms, essential software for integration of genomic data is still lacking. Here, we present a novel Java-based program called CGI (Cytogenetics-Genomics Integrator) that matches the BAC clones from array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to genes from RNA expression profiling datasets. The matching is computed via a fast, backend MySQL database containing UCSC Genome Browser annotations. This program also provides an easy-to-use graphical user interface for visualizing and summarizing the correlation of DNA copy number changes and RNA expression patterns from a set of experiments. In addition, CGI uses a Java applet to display the copy number values of a specifi c BAC clone in aCGH experiments side by side with the expression levels of genes that are mapped back to that BAC clone from the microarray experiments. The CGI program is built on top of extensible, reusable graphic components specifically designed for biologists. It is cross-platform compatible and the source code is freely available under the General Public License.
Array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization Reveals Loss of SOCS6 Is Associated with Poor Prognosis in Primary Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma  [PDF]
Krishna B. Sriram, Jill E. Larsen, Santiyagu M. Savarimuthu Francis, Casey M. Wright, Belinda E. Clarke, Edwina E. Duhig, Kevin M. Brown, Nicholas K. Hayward, Ian A. Yang, Rayleen V. Bowman, Kwun M. Fong
PLOS ONE , 2012, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0030398
Abstract: Background Primary tumor recurrence commonly occurs after surgical resection of lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Little is known about the genes driving SCC recurrence. Methods We used array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) to identify genes affected by copy number alterations that may be involved in SCC recurrence. Training and test sets of resected primary lung SCC were assembled. aCGH was used to determine genomic copy number in a training set of 62 primary lung SCCs (28 with recurrence and 34 with no evidence of recurrence) and the altered copy number of candidate genes was confirmed by quantitative PCR (qPCR). An independent test set of 72 primary lung SCCs (20 with recurrence and 52 with no evidence of recurrence) was used for biological validation. mRNA expression of candidate genes was studied using qRT-PCR. Candidate gene promoter methylation was evaluated using methylation microarrays and Sequenom EpiTYPER analysis. Results 18q22.3 loss was identified by aCGH as being significantly associated with recurrence (p = 0.038). Seven genes within 18q22.3 had aCGH copy number loss associated with recurrence but only SOCS6 copy number was both technically replicated by qPCR and biologically validated in the test set. SOCS6 copy number loss correlated with reduced mRNA expression in the study samples and in the samples with copy number loss, there was a trend for increased methylation, albeit non-significant. Overall survival was significantly poorer in patients with SOCS6 loss compared to patients without SOCS6 loss in both the training (30 vs. 43 months, p = 0.023) and test set (27 vs. 43 months, p = 0.010). Conclusion Reduced copy number and mRNA expression of SOCS6 are associated with disease recurrence in primary lung SCC and may be useful prognostic biomarkers.
Genomic profiling using array comparative genomic hybridization define distinct subtypes of diffuse large b-cell lymphoma: a review of the literature  [cached]
Tirado Carlos A,Chen Weina,García Rolando,Kohlman Kelly A
Journal of Hematology & Oncology , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1756-8722-5-54
Abstract: Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is the most common type of non-Hodgkin Lymphoma comprising of greater than 30% of adult non-Hodgkin Lymphomas. DLBCL represents a diverse set of lymphomas, defined as diffuse proliferation of large B lymphoid cells. Numerous cytogenetic studies including karyotypes and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), as well as morphological, biological, clinical, microarray and sequencing technologies have attempted to categorize DLBCL into morphological variants, molecular and immunophenotypic subgroups, as well as distinct disease entities. Despite such efforts, most lymphoma remains undistinguishable and falls into DLBCL, not otherwise specified (DLBCL-NOS). The advent of microarray-based studies (chromosome, RNA, gene expression, etc) has provided a plethora of high-resolution data that could potentially facilitate the finer classification of DLBCL. This review covers the microarray data currently published for DLBCL. We will focus on these types of data; 1) array based CGH; 2) classical CGH; and 3) gene expression profiling studies. The aims of this review were three-fold: (1) to catalog chromosome loci that are present in at least 20% or more of distinct DLBCL subtypes; a detailed list of gains and losses for different subtypes was generated in a table form to illustrate specific chromosome loci affected in selected subtypes; (2) to determine common and distinct copy number alterations among the different subtypes and based on this information, characteristic and similar chromosome loci for the different subtypes were depicted in two separate chromosome ideograms; and, (3) to list re-classified subtypes and those that remained indistinguishable after review of the microarray data. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort to compile and review available literatures on microarray analysis data and their practical utility in classifying DLBCL subtypes. Although conventional cytogenetic methods such as Karyotypes and FISH have played a major role in classification schemes of lymphomas, better classification models are clearly needed to further understanding the biology, disease outcome and therapeutic management of DLBCL. In summary, microarray data reviewed here can provide better subtype specific classifications models for DLBCL.
Genomic profiling of plasmablastic lymphoma using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH): revealing significant overlapping genomic lesions with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma
Chung-Che Chang, Xiaobo Zhou, Jesalyn J Taylor, Wan-Ting Huang, Xianwen Ren, Federico Monzon, Yongdong Feng, Pulivarthi H Rao, Xin-Yan Lu, Facchetti Fabio, Susan Hilsenbeck, Chad J Creighton, Elaine S Jaffe, Ching-Ching Lau
Journal of Hematology & Oncology , 2009, DOI: 10.1186/1756-8722-2-47
Abstract: Examination of genomic data in PL revealed that the most frequent segmental gain (> 40%) include: 1p36.11-1p36.33, 1p34.1-1p36.13, 1q21.1-1q23.1, 7q11.2-7q11.23, 11q12-11q13.2 and 22q12.2-22q13.3. This correlated with segmental gains occurring in high frequency in DLBCL (AIDS-related and non AIDS-related) cases. There were some segmental gains and some segmental loss that occurred in PL but not in the other types of lymphoma suggesting that these foci may contain genes responsible for the differentiation of this lymphoma. Additionally, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and AIDS associated DLBCL suggesting that these foci may be associated with HIV infection. Furthermore, some segmental gains and some segmental loss occurred only in PL and PCM suggesting that these lesions may be related to plasmacytic differentiation.To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first genomic exploration of PL. The genomic aberration pattern of PL appears to be more similar to that of DLBCL (AIDS-related or non AIDS-related) than to PCM. Our findings suggest that PL may remain best classified as a subtype of DLBCL at least at the genome level.Plasmablastic lymphoma (PL), one of the most frequent oral malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients, was first characterized by Delecluse et al [1]. They proposed that this constituted a new subtype of diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL); it was suggested as a distinct entity based on its blastic morphology, its clinical behavior involving predominantly extramedullary sites (particularly oral cavity), and its limited antigenic phenotype data suggesting differentiation toward plasmacytic differentiation (CD20-, CD79a+ and VS38c+). The incidence of PL has increased following the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) [2,3]. By WHO Classification, PL is categorized as a subtype of DLBCL associated with HIV and Epstein-Barr virus [1,4,5].Recent morph
Prognostic Impact of Array-based Genomic Profiles in Esophageal Squamous Cell Cancer
Ana Carneiro, Anna Isinger, Anna Karlsson, Jan Johansson, G?ran J?nsson, P?r-Ola Bendahl, Dan Falkenback, Britta Halvarsson, Mef Nilbert
BMC Cancer , 2008, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2407-8-98
Abstract: A 32 k aCGH platform was used for high resolution mapping of copy number changes in 30 stage I-IV ESCC. Potential interdependent alterations and deranged pathways were identified and copy number changes were correlated to stage, differentiation and survival.Copy number alterations affected median 19% of the genome and included recurrent gains of chromosome regions 5p, 7p, 7q, 8q, 10q, 11q, 12p, 14q, 16p, 17p, 19p, 19q, and 20q and losses of 3p, 5q, 8p, 9p and 11q. High-level amplifications were observed in 30 regions and recurrently involved 7p11 (EGFR), 11q13 (MYEOV, CCND1, FGF4, FGF3, PPFIA, FAD, TMEM16A, CTTS and SHANK2) and 11q22 (PDFG). Gain of 7p22.3 predicted nodal metastases and gains of 1p36.32 and 19p13.3 independently predicted poor survival in multivariate analysis.aCGH profiling verified genetic complexity in ESCC and herein identified imbalances of multiple central tumorigenic pathways. Distinct gains correlate with clinicopathological variables and independently predict survival, suggesting clinical applicability of genomic profiling in ESCC.Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is a major cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Despite advances in diagnostic methods and combined treatment modalities, the majority of the tumors are diagnosed at advanced stages and the overall 5-year survival rate remains 40%. ESCC develops through a multistep process from dysplasia, through carcinoma in situ to invasive carcinoma, and the acquisition of genetic alterations is tightly related to the dysplasia-carcinoma sequence [1]. The characterization of genetic alterations inherently linked to ESCC development and an in-depth understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying carcinogenesis and growth control may therefore provide information relevant for early tumor detection, refined prognosis and development of novel targeted therapeutics.Loss of heterozygozity (LOH) studies and conventional comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analyses have demonst
Computational Methods for the Analysis of Array Comparative Genomic Hybridization
Raj Chari,William W. Lockwood,Wan L. Lam
Cancer Informatics , 2006,
Abstract: Array comparative genomic hybridization (array CGH) is a technique for assaying the copy number status of cancer genomes. The widespread use of this technology has lead to a rapid accumulation of high throughput data, which in turn has prompted the development of computational strategies for the analysis of array CGH data. Here we explain the principles behind array image processing, data visualization and genomic profile analysis, review currently available software packages, and raise considerations for future software development.
Comparative genomic hybridization analysis of genetic aberrations associated with development of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in Henan, China  [cached]
Yan-Ru Qin, Li-Dong Wang, Zong-Min Fan, Dora Kwong, Xin-Yuan Guan
World Journal of Gastroenterology , 2008,
Abstract: AIM: To characterize cytogenetic alterations in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) and its metastasis.METHODS: A total of 37 cases of primary ESCC and 15 pairs of primary ESCC tumors and their matched metastatic lymph nodes cases were enrolled from Linzhou, the high incidence area for ESCC in Henan, northern China. The comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was applied to determine the chromosomal aberrations on the DNA extracted from the frozen ESCC and metastatic lymph node samples from these patients.RESULTS: CGH showed chromosomal aberrations in all the cases. In 37 cases of primary ESCC, chromosomal profile of DNA copy number was characterized by frequently detected gains at 8q (29/37, 78%), 3q (24/37, 65%), 5p (19/37, 51%); and frequently detected losses at 3p (21/37, 57%), 8p and 9q (14/37, 38%). In 15 pairs of primary ESCC tumors and their matched metastatic lymph node cases, the majority of the chromosomal aberrations in both primary tumor and metastatic lymph node lesions were consistent with the primary ESCC cases, but new candidate regions of interest were also detected. The most significant finding is the gains of chromosome 6p with a minimum high-level amplification region at 6p12-6q12 in 7 metastatic lymph nodes but only in 2 corresponding primary tumors (P = 0.05) and 20p with a minimum high-level amplification region at 20p12 in 11 metastatic lymph nodes but only in 5 corresponding primary tumors (P < 0.05). Another interesting finding is the loss of chromosome 10p and 10q in 8 and 7 metastatic lymph nodes but only in 2 corresponding primary tumors (P < 0.05).CONCLUSION: Using the CGH technique to detect chromosomal aberrations in both the primary tumor and its metastatic lymph nodes of ESCC, gains of 8q, 3q and 5p and loss of 3p, 8p, 9q and 13q were specifically implicated in ESCC in Linzhou population. Gains of 6p and 20p and loss of 10pq may contribute to the lymph node metastasis of ESCC. These findings suggest that the gains and losses of chromosomal regions may contain ESCC-related oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes and provide important theoretic information for identifying and cloning novel ESCC-related oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes.
Comparison of array-based comparative genomic hybridization with gene expression-based regional expression biases to identify genetic abnormalities in hepatocellular carcinoma
Kyle A Furge, Karl J Dykema, Coral Ho, Xin Chen
BMC Genomics , 2005, DOI: 10.1186/1471-2164-6-67
Abstract: REBs were identified from a set of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) gene expression profiles using a multiple span moving binomial test and compared to genetic abnormalities identified using array-based comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). In the majority of cases, REBs overlapped genetic abnormalities as determined by aCGH. For example, both methods identified narrow regions of frequent amplification on chromosome 1p and narrow regions of frequent deletion on 17q. In a minority of cases, REBs were identified in regions not determined to be abnormal via other cytogenetic technologies. Specifically, expression biases reflective of cell proliferation were frequently identified on chromosome 6p21-23.Identification of REBs using a multiple span moving binomial test produced reasonable approximations of underlying cytogenetic abnormalities. However, caution should be used when attributing REBs identified on chromosome 6p to cytogenetic events in rapidly proliferating cells.The parallel analysis of cytogenetic and transcriptional profiling data has revealed that changes in DNA copy number can have noticeable effects on gene expression. Studies comparing wild-type and mutant strains of yeast demonstrated that in regions of increased DNA copy number (i.e. genomic amplifications), the vast majority of genes that mapped within the amplified region had increased expression when compared to gene expression in non-amplified regions [1]. In this context, the unidirectional change in expression of a large number of adjacent genes can be termed a regional expression bias (REB). The dependence of gene expression on DNA copy number has also been observed with human derived samples, for example in a variety of aneuploid tumors and tumor derived cell lines, and in tissues obtained from patients with inherited trisomy disorders [2-13]. In these samples, ~40–70% of the genes that map to a cytogenetically abnormal region show corresponding expression changes; other genes within the reg
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