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Globalization of Science and Technology through Research and Development  [PDF]
Aqueil Ahmad
Open Journal of Social Sciences (JSS) , 2014, DOI: 10.4236/jss.2014.24031
Abstract: Globalization of science and technology is an integral aspect of globalization per se. The main engine of globalization is assumed to be the global economy propelled by global trade and technology transfers, the latter as aspects of globalization of science and technology. International trade and technology transfers are the engines that drive global economy. Much has been written on these drivers but relatively little on what drives globalization of science and technology which constitutes the backbone of international technology transfers. I attempt to fill this knowledge gap by suggesting that the drivers behind globalization of science and technology are the emerging global centers of collaborative research and development (R&D) as constituents of the global invisible college(s). “Science” throughout this article means both science and technology as the two closely related aspects of the same knowledge system.
Research collaboration and the expanding science grid: Measuring globalization processes worldwide  [PDF]
Robert J. W. Tijssen,Ludo Waltman,Nees Jan van Eck
Computer Science , 2012,
Abstract: This paper applies a new model and analytical tool to measure and study contemporary globalization processes in collaborative science - a world in which scientists, scholars, technicians and engineers interact within a 'grid' of interconnected research sites and collaboration networks. The building blocks of our metrics are the cities where scientific research is conducted, as mentioned in author addresses on research publications. The unit of analysis is the geographical distance between those cities. In our macro-level trend analysis, covering the years 2000-2010, we observe that research collaboration distances have been increasing, while the share of collaborative contacts with foreign cities has leveled off. Collaboration distances and growth rates differ significantly between countries and between fields of science. The application of a distance metrics to compare and track these processes opens avenues for further studies, both at the meso-level and at the micro-level, into how research collaboration patterns and trends are driving and shaping the connectivity fabric of world science.
Globalization and Science Education: The Implications for Indigenous Knowledge Systems  [cached]
Cassie Quigley
International Education Studies , 2009, DOI: 10.5539/ies.v2n1p76
Abstract: Much of the current diversity literature in science education does not address the complexity of the issues of indigenous learners in their postcolonial environments and calls for a “one size fits all” instructional approach (Lee, 2001). Indigenous knowledge needs to be promoted and supported. There is currently a global initiative of maintaining worldviews, languages, and environments of which science education can be a part (McKinley, 2007). This paper is organized around five main topics that further guide the theoretical framework for this important area: a) describing postcolonialism and indigeneity related to science education, b) defining the terms indigenous knowledge, traditional ecological knowledge, c) western modern science and the effects of globalization on these terms d) examining the research on learning implications of IK and/or TEK in classrooms with a focus on the research into student learning in indigenous language, e) connecting place-based education to curricular implications for indigenous knowledge systems.
Globalization and Glassy Ideality of the Web of Twentieth Century Science  [PDF]
J. C. Phillips
Physics , 2010,
Abstract: Scientific communication is an essential part of modern science: whereas Archimedes worked alone, Newton (correspondence with Hooke, 1676) acknowledged that "If I have seen a little further, it is by standing on the shoulders of Giants." How is scientific communication reflected in the patterns of citations in scientific papers? How have these patterns changed in the 20th century, as both means of communication and individual transportation changed rapidly, compared to the earlier post-Newton 18th and 19th centuries? Here we discuss a glass model for scientific communications, based on a unique 2009 scientometric study of 25 million papers and 600 million citations that encapsulates the epistemology of modern science. The glass model predicts and explains, using no adjustable parameters, a surprisingly universal internal structure in the development of scientific research, which is essentially constant across the natural sciences, but which because of globalization changed qualitatively around 1960. Globalization corresponds physically to anomalous superdiffusion, which has been observed near the molecular glass transition, and can enhance molecular diffusion by factors as large as 100.
Collaborative Web between open and closed science
Alessandro Delfanti
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: “Web 2.0” is the mantra enthusiastically repeated in the past few years on anything concerning the production of culture, dialogue and online communication. Even science is changing, along with the processes involving the communication, collaboration and cooperation created through the web, yet rooted in some of its historical features of openness. For this issue, JCOM has asked some experts on the most recent changes in science to analyse the potential and the contradictions lying in online collaborative science. The new open science feeds on the opportunity to freely contribute to knowledge production, sharing not only data, but also software and hardware. But it is open also to the outside, where citizens use Web 2.0 instruments to discuss about science in a horizontal way.
Understanding health systems, health economies and globalization: the need for social science perspectives
Susan F Murray, Ramila Bisht, Rama Baru, Emma Pitchforth
Globalization and Health , 2012, DOI: 10.1186/1744-8603-8-30
Abstract: The peer-reviewed, online open-access journal Globalization and Health was established in [2005] with the aim of providing an international forum for high quality original research, knowledge sharing and debate on the topic of globalization and its effects on health, both positive and negative. Within its stated scope the journal recognises the complexity and breadth of topics and the range of disciplinary perspectives required to understand the relationship between globalization and health. In this editorial and special issue we pay attention to the particular contribution of social science. Social scientists, including economists, political scientists and sociologists, have undoubtedly been key contributors to the discussions and theorising about globalization processes since they began to use the term in the [1960]s, long its current widespread use. That theoretical armoury is combined with research approaches that lend themselves well to exploration of the micro, meso and macro forces that confront health systems in the globalizing world, and one would expect to see prominent participation of these disciplines in current published research in this field. The review paper by Bisht et al. [] published in this special issue examines the broader ‘state of the art’ in this regard using the case of research on India, and gives suggestions for future ways forward. [1] We also undertook a mapping of this journal’s own content in order to track trends, emphases, commonalities and differences in the work published over the first six full years of its operation ( [2005,2010]) and to locate the place of social science within its content so far. Ninety four papers were reviewed for topic, author’s institution, disciplinary perspective, geographical focus, methodology and funding. Topics were then grouped into more general themes.The topic areas of HIV/AIDS and globalization and food, diet and obesity have been consistent themes throughout the early years of the journal, as h
?The past is a foreign country?? Acculturation theory and the anthropology of globalization
Leal,Jo?o;
Etnográfica , 2011,
Abstract: contemporary anthropology has developed a consistent interest in the study of modes of circulation of people, objects and ideas associated with current cultural globalization. this interest is usually presented as a new development in anthropological theory and its possible predecessors, such as diffusionism and acculturation theory, dismissed as irrelevant. focusing on the works of melville herskovits and roger bastide, this article argues for a less biased imaged of acculturation theory and stresses the ways in which some of its achievements can inspire current approaches to cultural globalization.
Collaborative Web between open and closed science (Italian original version)
Alessandro Delfanti
JCOM : Journal of Science Communication , 2008,
Abstract: “Web 2.0” is the mantra enthusiastically repeated in the past few years on anything concerning the production of culture, dialogue and online communication. Even science is changing, along with the processes involving the communication, collaboration and cooperation created through the web, yet rooted in some of its historical features of openness. For this issue, JCOM has asked some experts on the most recent changes in science to analyse the potential and the contradictions lying in online collaborative science. The new open science feeds on the opportunity to freely contribute to knowledge production, sharing not only data, but also software and hardware. But it is open also to the outside, where citizens use Web 2.0 instruments to discuss about science in a horizontal way.
Information Science: Its Past, Present and Future  [PDF]
Xue-Shan Yan
Information , 2011, DOI: 10.3390/info2030510
Abstract: Early in its history and development, there were three types of classical information sciences: computer and information science, library and information science, telecommunications and information science. With the infiltration of the concept of information into various fields, an information discipline community of around 200 members was formed around the sub-fields of information theory or informatics or information science. For such a large community, a systematization, two trends of thought, some perspectives and suggestions are discussed in this paper.
Research on Nature of Science: Reflections on the Past, Anticipations of the Future  [cached]
Norman G. LEDERMAN
Asia-Pacific Forum on Science Learning and Teaching , 2006,
Abstract: Later this year, a new Handbook of Research in Science Education will be published by Lawrence Erlbaum and Associates (edited by Sandra Abell and Norman G. Lederman). As one might expect, there will be a chapter on nature of science. The chapter will represent the fourth systematic review of research on nature of science (Abd-El-Khalick & Lederman, 2000; Lederman, 1992; Meichtry, 1992). What follows is a brief review of the history of research in the field and some speculations about WHAT research the future may hold.
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