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THE IMPORTANCE OF TRUST IN MANAGER-EMPLOYEE RELATIONSHIPS  [PDF]
Katarzyna Krot1,Dagmara Lewicka
International Journal of Electronic Business Management , 2012,
Abstract: Trust is a complex and multidimensional phenomenon. Organizational trust is an important partof professional relationships between co-workers, between managers and employees, or betweenemployees and managers. Trust can be either interpersonal or institutional in nature. To measure,understand, and explain trust in an organizational context, it is important to identify differentdimensions of trust (competence, benevolence, and integrity), different types of trust (horizontaltrust between co-workers, vertical trust between managers and employees, and vertical trustbetween employees and managers), and the roles that different dimensions of trust have indifferent types of trust. The aim of this paper is to determine the roles that the differentdimensions of trust have in each of the different types of trust at Gaia, a Polish lingerie company.Study results show competence is the least important dimension of trust in all of the differenttypes of trust at Gaia, the Polish lingerie company. Integrity is the most important dimension oftrust in relationships between co-workers. Benevolence is the most important dimension of trustin relationships between employees and managers.
Exploring trust relationships during times of change  [cached]
Hartmut Von der Ohe,Nico Martins
South African Journal of Human Resource Management , 2010, DOI: 10.4102/sajhrm.v8i1.256
Abstract: Orientation: In the current economic climate and the resulting fast-changing global business and political environment, trust among different role players in organisations has become critical for survival. Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the impact of different variables such as demographics on trust relationships in South African organisations. Motivation for the study: Anecdotal evidence and preliminary data collected for a national trust indicator seemed to suggest a shift in trust levels in organisations. Research design: A trust questionnaire was administered to a convenience sample of 307 respondents in all economic sectors. Parametric and nonparametric analyses were used to determine significant differences among economic sectors, job levels and sample periods. Main findings: No significant differences were found for job levels or the different sample periods. However, significant differences were found for the economic sectors and, specifically, between government participants and other sectors for the dimensions of change, team management, organisational trust, information sharing and credibility. Practical implications: In times of change, leadership in organisations need to be aware of the impact on trust levels. It is therefore important that leaders in government focus more on trust-enhancing behaviours needed to repair mistrust in organisations. Contribution: Although the effect of time on trust levels is inconclusive, the clearly differing levels of trust in various economic sectors point to the importance of appropriate and fitting approaches to building trust and not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ attitude. How to cite this article: Von der Ohe, H., & Martins, N. (2010). Exploring trust relationships during times of change. SA Journal of Human Resource Management/SA Tydskrif vir Menslikehulpbronbestuur, 8(1), Art. #256, 9 pages. DOI: 10.4102/sajhrm.v8i1.256
Managing trust relationships: calculative, affective, belief and performance
Claro, Danny Pimentel;Claro, Priscila B. Oliveira;
BAR. Brazilian Administration Review , 2008, DOI: 10.1590/S1807-76922008000400004
Abstract: there is an ongoing concern among managers and scholars: how can firms develop trust and achieve performance? our paper aims to review the emerging perspective of trust and propose mechanisms to build trust in channel relationships. in the literature, we identified six mechanisms: calculative, affective, belief, embeddedness, continuity and capability. a central hypothesis focuses on the direct impact of these mechanisms on firm performance. we conducted a survey (n=132) in the brazilian distribution market of agrochemical products. ols regression estimation was employed to test the hypothesis. results show the impact of the mechanisms of calculative, affective, belief on performance. the findings highlight that, even though environment leads to suspicion and doubts, managers seek trust relationships and try to develop them using a combination of few mechanisms to overcome difficulties and perform well.
Managing Trust Relationships: Calculative, Affective, Belief and Performance
Danny Pimentel Claro,Priscila B. Oliveira Claro
BAR. Brazilian Administration Review , 2008,
Abstract: There is an ongoing concern among managers and scholars: how can firms develop trust and achieve performance? Our paper aims to review the emerging perspective of trust and propose mechanisms to build trust in channel relationships. In the literature, we identified six mechanisms: calculative, affective, belief, embeddedness, continuity and capability. A central hypothesis focuses on the direct impact of these mechanisms on firm performance. We conducted a survey (n=132) in the Brazilian Distribution Market of agrochemical products. OLS regression estimation was employed to test the hypothesis. Results show the impact of the mechanisms of calculative, affective, belief on performance. The findings highlight that, even though environment leads to suspicion and doubts, managers seek trust relationships and try to develop them using a combination of few mechanisms to overcome difficulties and perform well.
Matrix Factorization with Explicit Trust and Distrust Relationships  [PDF]
Rana Forsati,Mehrdad Mahdavi,Mehrnoush Shamsfard,Mohamed Sarwat
Computer Science , 2014,
Abstract: With the advent of online social networks, recommender systems have became crucial for the success of many online applications/services due to their significance role in tailoring these applications to user-specific needs or preferences. Despite their increasing popularity, in general recommender systems suffer from the data sparsity and the cold-start problems. To alleviate these issues, in recent years there has been an upsurge of interest in exploiting social information such as trust relations among users along with the rating data to improve the performance of recommender systems. The main motivation for exploiting trust information in recommendation process stems from the observation that the ideas we are exposed to and the choices we make are significantly influenced by our social context. However, in large user communities, in addition to trust relations, the distrust relations also exist between users. For instance, in Epinions the concepts of personal "web of trust" and personal "block list" allow users to categorize their friends based on the quality of reviews into trusted and distrusted friends, respectively. In this paper, we propose a matrix factorization based model for recommendation in social rating networks that properly incorporates both trust and distrust relationships aiming to improve the quality of recommendations and mitigate the data sparsity and the cold-start users issues. Through experiments on the Epinions data set, we show that our new algorithm outperforms its standard trust-enhanced or distrust-enhanced counterparts with respect to accuracy, thereby demonstrating the positive effect that incorporation of explicit distrust information can have on recommender systems.
General Methodology for Analysis and Modeling of Trust Relationships in Distributed Computing  [cached]
Weiliang Zhao,Vijay Varadharajan,George Bryan
Journal of Computers , 2006, DOI: 10.4304/jcp.1.2.42-53
Abstract: In this paper, we discuss a general methodology for analysis and modeling of trust relationships in distributed computing. We discuss the classification of trust relationships, categorize trust relationships into two layers and provide a hierarchy of trust relationships based on a formal definition of trust relationship. We provide guidelines for the analysis and modeling of trust relationships. We review operations on trust relationships and relative types of trust relationships in our previous work. We provide a set of definitions for the properties of direction and symmetry of trust relationships. In order to analyze and model the scope and diversity of trust relationship, we define trust scope label. We provide some example scenarios to illustrate the proposed definitions about properties of trust relationship. All the definitions about the properties of trust relationships are elements of the taxonomy framework of trust relationships. We discuss the lifecycle of trust relationships that includes the analysis and modeling of trust relationships, trust relationships at runtime, and change management of trust relationships. We propose a trust management architecture at high level to place the analysis and modeling of trust relationships under the background of trust management.
Rome I Regulation a—Mostly—Unified Private International Law of Contractual Relationships within—Most—of the European Union  [cached]
Behr Volker
Journal of Law and Commerce , 2011, DOI: 10.5195/jlc.2011.3
Abstract: The year 2009 was an important year in the development of unified private international law in the European Union. At the beginning of the year, Regulation (EC) No. 864/2007 on the law applicable to non-contractual obligations (Rome II) entered into force. And at the end of the year Regulation (EC) 593/2008 on the law applicable to contractual obligations (Rome I) followed suit. Hence, within one year significant parts of the private international law relevant to international business transactions have been unified within most of the Member States of the European Union. Further segments are to follow up on these developments.
Intervention in health care teams and working relationships
Laurenson M,Heath T,Gribbin S
Journal of Healthcare Leadership , 2012,
Abstract: Mary Laurenson, Tracey Heath, Sarah GribbinUniversity of Hull, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Department of Health Professional Studies, Cottingham, Hull, United KingdomIntroduction: Communication is an intrinsic part of collaborative working but can be problematic when the complexities of professional and personal identities inhibit quality care provision. This paper investigates these complexities and recommends interventions to facilitate collaborative working.Methods: A qualitative comparative approach examined data collected from participants using purposive non-probability sampling. Perspectives were obtained from four professional groups (nurses, social workers, care managers, and police), from different organizations with different theoretical and practice frameworks, and from a fifth group (informal carers).Results: Curriculum change and leadership initiatives are required to address the complexities inhibiting collaborative working relationships. Integrating complexity theory, personality typology, and problem-based learning into the curriculum to understand behavioral actions will enable interventions to effect change and promote the centrality of those being cared for.Keywords: interprofessional education and working, complexity, communication, personality, problem-based learning
The Working Relationships between the EU, WEU and NATO  [PDF]
John Roper
Revista CIDOB d'Afers Internacionals , 1997,
Abstract: In addressing the working relationships among the three institutions responsible for European and transatlantic relations in the field of security, it is necessary to examine why they were relatively separate until the beginning of this present decade, why they hadinitially so much difficulty in developing affective patterns of cooperation, why this is now improving, and what the prospects are for their future cooperation into the 21st century. It must be noted from the onset that some of the problems of developing effective working relationships arise from the different, albeit overlapping memberships of the European Union and NATO; and while all the full members of WEU are members of both NATO and EU, the existence of a third player cannot be said to have always been helpful.
Working alliance, interpersonal trust and perceived coercion in mental health review hearings
Vidis Donnelly, Aideen Lynch, Damian Mohan, Harry G Kennedy
International Journal of Mental Health Systems , 2011, DOI: 10.1186/1752-4458-5-29
Abstract: The hearings were rated as positive or negative by patients and treating psychiatrists using the MacArthur scales for perceived coercion, perceived procedural justice (legal and medical) and for the impact of the hearing. We rated Global assessment of Function (GAF), Positive and Negative Symptom Scale (PANSS), Working Alliance Inventory (WAI) and Interpersonal Trust in Physician (ITP) scales six months before the hearing and repeated the WAI and ITP two weeks before and two weeks after the hearing, for 75 of 83 patients in a forensic medium and high secure hospital.Psychiatrists agreed with patients regarding the rating of hearings. Patients rated civil hearings (MHTs) more negatively than hearings under insanity legislation (MHRBs). Those reviewed by MHTs had lower scores for WAI and ITP. However, post-hearing WAI and ITP scores were not different from baseline and pre-hearing scores. Using the receiver operating characteristic, baseline WAI and ITP scores predicted how patients would rate the hearings, as did baseline GAF and PANSS scores.There was no evidence that positively perceived hearings improved WAI or ITP, but some evidence showed that negatively perceived hearings worsened them. Concentrating on functional recovery and symptom remission remains the best strategy for improved therapeutic relationships.It has been hypothesised that many aspects of legal process can be regarded as therapeutic jurisprudence, the study of the law as a therapeutic agent, in particular the law's impact on emotional life and on psychological well-being [1]. If the law can be used as a therapeutic agent, then therapeutic relationships and outcomes should be considered in this context. There is evidence that a fair and transparent legal process may have beneficial effects on clinical outcomes, and there is evidence to support this in relation to mental health hearings at the point of committal [2,3]. When post-committal hearings are allowed to become adversarial rather than inqui
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