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The "aesthetic turn": from Kant and romanticism to modern philosophy.  [PDF]
Sidorov A. M.
Kantovskij Sbornik , 2011, DOI: 10.5922/0207-6918-2011-2-7
Abstract: This article is devoted to the origins of the "aesthetic turn" in contemporary philosophy and the increasing importance of aesthetic categories and art experience for contemporary theories. Kant’s aesthetics, concepts of beauty, the sublime, genius, as well as variousaspects of their interpretation within the romantic doctrine of "new mythology" and aestheticisation of life, the discovery of a fragment as a way of poetic thinking became topical in contemporary debates about reality, knowledge, human being and society.
Feminism and the sociology of everyday life  [PDF]
Spasi? Ivana A.
Filozofija i Dru?tvo , 2003, DOI: 10.2298/fid0323151s
Abstract: This paper examines the influences of feminist thought on sociological theory and research, refracted through the conceptualization of the sphere of everyday life. It is argued that there are important theoretical affinities between feminism and the sociology of everyday life, as it has developed since mid-20th century. Main feminist contributions to sociological study of everyday life are identified at two levels: substantive (the study of formerly neglected social phenomena, particularly the private sphere), and epistemological (the questioning of positivistic ideals of objective and neutral social science). The position of the feminist theorist Dorothy Smith is selected for a more detailed critical discussion. In the concluding part of the paper some controversial points in the feminist concept of the sociology of everyday life are indicated.
An anthropological comparison between two studies of everyday life  [PDF]
Petkovi? Ivana
Filozofija i Dru?tvo , 2003, DOI: 10.2298/fid0323195p
Abstract: The paper is based on the experiences of a fieldwork researcher. Two studies of everyday life are compared. In spite of the differences in theoretical frameworks and methodologies, important similarities are identified, leading to identical basic results. These similarities are to be found in the (exclusive) dependence of the everyday survival on political survival, of everyday life on political life, of coping on political developments. The similarity is proved by pointing to the shared broader socio-historical framework in which both studies have been located, and to the uniqueness of the environment/area in which both have taken place. This leads to the final conclusion on the relation between the character of everyday life and the collective character/mentality, where the key mediator is political life and the character shaped within its domain. In a culture basically structured as a warrior culture, in the circumstances of huge civilizational changes at the global world scene, the local political mentality assumes specific features, somewhat modified in comparison with the traditional ethos. These features in turn directly shape the everyday, particularly of ordinary people, beyond the centers of power and global decision-making.
Blighted Spaces and the Politics of Everyday Life
II, Robert P. Fairbanks
Social Work and Society , 2003,
Abstract: While a great deal is known about the demographic and historical trends that shape the built environment of American cities, much less is known about the politics of everyday life among residents who continue to live in postindustrial neighborhoods. This study seeks to compensate for the current gaps in academic research by conducting spatially informed ethnography in a North Philadelphia community. Specifically, the study will explore the issue of urban "blight" from a cultural geography perspective, primarily by looking at the ways in which "blighted" spaces shape everyday life, and everyday life in turn shapes and produces the spatial environment. In response to these concerns, my study poses the questions: What would it mean to focus on the ways in which human agency, imagination, and subjectivity are shaped by "blighted" geographical locations? What would it mean to pay ethnographic attention to how subjects in given historical conditions are shaped by "blighted" spaces, as well as how they respond to these spaces in culturally specific ways? By incorporating critical interdisciplinary approaches, this study offers a new way of looking at the various practices of daily life - including flexible, informal economic activities and post-welfare related "lifestyles" of resistance. Through the lens of spatial ethnography, the study seeks to elucidate the ways in which postindustrial space interacts with culture, poverty and addiction; as well as the ways in which users continue to appropriate postindustrial spaces in culturally meaningful ways under the aegis of the semi-welfare state.
Uncertainty Regarding Waste Handling in Everyday Life  [PDF]
Greger Henriksson,Lynn ?kesson,Susanne Ewert
Sustainability , 2010, DOI: 10.3390/su2092799
Abstract: According to our study, based on interviews with households in a residential area in Sweden, uncertainty is a cultural barrier to improved recycling. Four causes of uncertainty are identified. Firstly, professional categories not matching cultural categories—people easily discriminate between certain categories (e.g., materials such as plastic and paper) but not between others (e.g., packaging and “non-packaging”). Thus a frequent cause of uncertainty is that the basic categories of the waste recycling system do not coincide with the basic categories used in everyday life. Challenged habits—source separation in everyday life is habitual, but when a habit is challenged, by a particular element or feature of the waste system, uncertainty can arise. Lacking fractions—some kinds of items cannot be left for recycling and this makes waste collection incomplete from the user’s point of view and in turn lowers the credibility of the system. Missing or contradictory rules of thumb—the above causes seem to be particularly relevant if no motivating principle or rule of thumb (within the context of use) is successfully conveyed to the user. This paper discusses how reducing uncertainty can improve recycling.
Pierre in the lab’s everyday life  [cached]
Kahane Claudine
EPJ Web of Conferences , 2012, DOI: 10.1051/epjconf/20123401001
Abstract: I shall evoke, through some memories of the pioneers years of the Grenoble Astrophysics Group, how Pierre played a decisive role in the lab’s everyday life, as a computer wizard, as an insatiable inquiring mind and as an always careful and warm colleague.
Disorder and Everyday Life in Barrancabermeja
Gill,Lesley;
Colombia Internacional , 2011,
Abstract: this article examines how years of political violence and neoliberal restructuring have disorganized social life in barrancabermeja. how, it asks, can working people grasp the future without the stability to understand the present and the ways that it both emerges and is different from the past? it explores how an extreme form of neoliberalism fragmented various forms of social solidarity, infused social life with fear, and generated violent, clientelistic networks that flourished in the absence of rights. it argues that unrestrained power and violence deprived people of the coherence needed to take care of themselves and to grasp the connections between the past, present, and future that are necessary "to make history."
Disorder and Everyday Life in Barrancabermeja  [cached]
Lesley Gill
Colombia Internacional , 2011,
Abstract: This article examines how years of political violence and neoliberal restructuring have disorganized social life in Barrancabermeja. How, it asks, can working people grasp the future without the stability to understand the present and the ways that it both emerges and is different from the past? It explores how an extreme form of neoliberalism fragmented various forms of social solidarity, infused social life with fear, and generated violent, clientelistic networks that flourished in the absence of rights. It argues that unrestrained power and violence deprived people of the coherence needed to take care of themselves and to grasp the connections between the past, present, and future that are necessary “to make history.”
Everyday life through the eyes of ethnologists
Pu?kareva Natal`ja L.
Glasnik Etnografskog Instituta SANU , 2005, DOI: 10.2298/gei0553021p
Abstract: This research focuses on some of the new and distinctive patterns of scientific discourse with special reference to the differences between ethnological research of ordinary life and history of everyday life as a part of "new social history". The author try to show the changing paradigms in humanities, reorganization of its problematic, new sociological (ethnometodological, interdisciplinary) methods which were adopted in modern ethnology, as well as in the social history as a whole.
Knitting Practice in Korea: A Geography of Everyday Experiences
Hye Young Shin,Ji Soo Ha
Asian Culture and History , 2011, DOI: 10.5539/ach.v3n1p105
Abstract: The recent resurgence of knitting is an ambiguous social phenomenon because it has pre-industrial connotations in late modern society. Knitting is inherently an ambiguous practice which blurs the boundary between production and consumption, the material and the mental and subject and object. This paper explores Korean knitting practice from the angle of social practice. An examination of knitting practice in Korea revealed that the inherent heterogeneity is intricately intertwined with the complex landscape of knitting practice, which is dispersed in a range of different forms of subgroups. Also, the multifaceted aspect of these subgroups which combines consumption, production, education and socialization, refers to the complicated and contrasting aspects of contemporary consumption and consumers. This paper particularly pays attention to the role of practical understanding as a form of skill, know-how and knowledge in the formulation and transformation of knitting practice. It also examines the emotional landscape of knitting practice, which is constructed and mediated in close interconnection with the material dimensions of the practice.
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