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Efecto del Almacenamiento a Diferentes Temperaturas sobre la Calidad de Tuna Roja (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Miller) Effect of the Storage at Different Temperatures on the Quality of Red Prickle Pear (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Miller)  [cached]
Carlos E Ochoa,José A Guerrero
Información Tecnológica , 2012,
Abstract: Se estudia el efecto del almacenamiento a diferentes temperaturas sobre la calidad de tuna roja (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Miller), variedad San Martín. El fruto se almacenó a 4±1, 9±2 y 28±2°C para determinar su vida útil. Se realizó semanalmente la caracterización fisicoquímica, enzimática, antioxidante y microbiológica durante el almacenamiento, hasta observar características no aptas para el consumo. Se observó que el tiempo y la temperatura de almacenamiento son factores que afectan de manera significativa (P<0,05) a la pérdida de peso, la textura y la actividad de la polifenoloxidasa en cáscara de tuna. El contenido de compuestos fenólicos, la capacidad antioxidante y la actividad de la enzima pectinesterasa en pulpa de tuna no presentaron diferencia significativa (P>0,05) a las diferentes temperaturas de almacenamiento. Sin embargo, la actividad antioxidante presentó un aumento significativo con el tiempo. The effect of the storage at different temperatures on the quality of red prickle pear (Opuntia ficus indica (L.) Miller) San Martín variety. The fruit was stored at 4±1, 9±2, and 28±2°C for determining its shelf life. Once a week, physicochemical, enzymatic, antioxidant and microbiological characteristics were evaluated until fruit showed no edible characteristics. Time and storage temperature were the two parameters that significantly affected (p<0.05) weight loss, texture and activity of polyphenoloxidase in pear peel. Phenolic compounds, antioxidant capacity, and pectinesterase activity did not show significant difference (p>0.05) during storage time. However, antioxidant capacity presented a significant increase with time.
PRICKLE1 Interaction with SYNAPSIN I Reveals a Role in Autism Spectrum Disorders  [PDF]
Lily Paemka, Vinit B. Mahajan, Jessica M. Skeie, Levi P. Sowers, Salleh N. Ehaideb, Pedro Gonzalez-Alegre, Toshikuni Sasaoka, Hirotaka Tao, Asuka Miyagi, Naoto Ueno, Keizo Takao, Tsuyoshi Miyakawa, Shu Wu, Benjamin W. Darbro, Polly J. Ferguson, Andrew A. Pieper, Jeremiah K. Britt, John A. Wemmie, Danielle S. Rudd, Thomas Wassink, Hatem El-Shanti, Heather C. Mefford, Gemma L. Carvill, J. Robert Manak, Alexander G. Bassuk
PLOS ONE , 2013, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0080737
Abstract: The frequent comorbidity of Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs) with epilepsy suggests a shared underlying genetic susceptibility; several genes, when mutated, can contribute to both disorders. Recently, PRICKLE1 missense mutations were found to segregate with ASD. However, the mechanism by which mutations in this gene might contribute to ASD is unknown. To elucidate the role of PRICKLE1 in ASDs, we carried out studies in Prickle1+/? mice and Drosophila, yeast, and neuronal cell lines. We show that mice with Prickle1 mutations exhibit ASD-like behaviors. To find proteins that interact with PRICKLE1 in the central nervous system, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen with a human brain cDNA library and isolated a peptide with homology to SYNAPSIN I (SYN1), a protein involved in synaptogenesis, synaptic vesicle formation, and regulation of neurotransmitter release. Endogenous Prickle1 and Syn1 co-localize in neurons and physically interact via the SYN1 region mutated in ASD and epilepsy. Finally, a mutation in PRICKLE1 disrupts its ability to increase the size of dense-core vesicles in PC12 cells. Taken together, these findings suggest PRICKLE1 mutations contribute to ASD by disrupting the interaction with SYN1 and regulation of synaptic vesicles.
A Simulation Tool for Real-Time Systems Using Environmental Energy Harvesting  [PDF]
M. Chetto,H. Zhang
International Journal of Computer and Electrical Engineering , 2013, DOI: 10.7763/ijcee.2013.v5.681
Abstract: Energy constrained systems such as sensor networks can increase their usable lifetimes by extracting energy from their environment. This is known as energy harvesting. Task scheduling at the single nodes should account for the properties of the regenerative energy source which fluctuates, capacity of the energy storage as well as deadlines of the time critical tasks. Designing efficient scheduling strategies is significantly more complex compared to conventional real-time scheduling. In this paper, we present a simulator that enables to construct an optimal schedule using the so-called LSA algorithm, for any task set, battery capacity and energy source profile.
Seebeck Nanoantennas for Solar Energy Harvesting  [PDF]
E. Briones,J. Briones,A. Cuadrado,J. C. Martinez-Anton,S. McMurtry,M. Hehn,F. Montaigne,J. Alda,F. J. Gonzalez
Physics , 2014, DOI: 10.1063/1.4895028
Abstract: We propose a mid-infrared device based on thermocouple optical antennas for light sensing and energy harvesting applications. We numerically demonstrate that antennas are able to generate low-power dc signals by beneficing of the thermoelectric properties of the metals that constitute them. We theoretically evaluate the optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency for harvesting applications and finally discuss strategies to increase its performance. Thermocouple optical antennas therefore open the route toward the design of photovoltaic devices.
Characterization of avocado pear (Persea americana) and African pear (Dacryodes edulis) extracts
EU Ikhuoria, M Maliki
African Journal of Biotechnology , 2007,
Abstract: The oil from edible avocado pear (Persea americana) and African pear (Dacryodes edulis) were extracted with chloroform. The oil were characterized for melting point, refractive index, relative viscosity, free fatty acids, saponification value, iodine value, acid value and percentage unsaponifable matter. The percent oil content in the fruit pulp was determined. The oil content of avocado pear was 9.1% while that of African pear was 23.2%.The physico-chemical characteristics and fatty acid composition of these oils, suggest some industrial potentials.
Photovoltaic Cells  [cached]
Karolis Kiela
Science – Future of Lithuania , 2012,
Abstract: The article deals with an overview of photovoltaic cells that are currently manufactured and those being developed, including one or several p-n junction, organic and dye-sensitized cells using quantum dots. The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of various photovoltaic cells, identifies the main parameters, explains the main reasons for the losses that may occur in photovoltaic cells and looks at the ways to minimize them.Article in Lithuanian
Extrusion Processing of Cactus Pear
Preetam Sarkar,Nikhil Setia and Gour S. Choudhury
Advance Journal of Food Science and Technology , 2011,
Abstract: Whole fruit utilization using extrusion technology has received limited attention in the food processing industry. The objective of this study was to investigate the utilization of prickly pear fruit solids in extruded food products. Peeled prickly pear fruits were ground to form a paste. This paste was strained to remove the seeds and then mixed with rice flour in three different solid ratios. The three blends were dried to a moisture level of 13% (w/w basis) and ground to form fine flour. These feed mixes were extruded in a twin screw extruder (Clextral EV-25) at a feed rate of 15 kg/h, feed moisture content of 13% (w/w), screw speed of 400 rpm and L/D ratio of 40:1. The temperature profile from feed to die end was maintained as: 25, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 100, 120, 140oC. The extruded products were analyzed for physical and textural properties. Apparent density and breaking strength of the cactus pear extrudates increased from 116.07 to 229.66 kg/m3 and 58.5 to 178.63 kPa, respectively with increase in fruit solid level. However, true density, porosity and radial expansion ratio decreased from 837.89 to 775.84 kg/m3, 86.12 to 70.34% and 12.37 to 6.6, respectively with increase in fruit solid level. This study demonstrated the potential of extrusion processing to utilize peeled cactus pear fruits for production of expanded food products.
Identification of a Simple Sequence Repeat molecular-marker set for large-scale analyses of pear germplasm
Dequigiovanni, Gabriel;Rech, Fernanda;Gomes, Felippe George Gatti;Cerotti, Ivan Somensi;Faoro, Ivan;Oliveira, Paulo Ricardo Dias de;Quecini, Vera;Ritschel, Patricia;
Crop Breeding and Applied Biotechnology , 2012, DOI: 10.1590/S1984-70332012000200004
Abstract: simple sequence repeats (ssr) are molecular markers suitable to assess the genetic variation of germplasm resources; however, large-scale ssr use requires protocol optimization. the present work aimed to identify ssr markers, developed for pear and other fruit species that are effective in characterizing pear germplasm collections and in demonstrating their use in providing support for genetic breeding programs. from a total of 62 ssr markers investigated, 23 yielding reproducible and polymorphic patterns were used to genotype a sample of 42 pear accessions of the brazilian pear germplasm bank (pgb). when compared to these 23 ssr markers, a subset of eleven markers, selected based on he, pic and pid, was used to distinguish individual accessions and perform cluster analysis with similar efficacy. genetic diversity analysis clustered the european, japanese and chinese accessions in distinct groups. this markers subset constitutes a valuable tool for several applications related to pear genetic resources management and breeding.
Identification of a Simple Sequence Repeat molecular-marker set for large-scale analyses of pear germplasm
Gabriel Dequigiovanni,Fernanda Rech,Felippe George Gatti Gomes,Ivan Somensi Cerotti
Crop Breeding and Applied Biotechnology , 2012,
Abstract: Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) are molecular markers suitable to assess the genetic variation of germplasm resources; however, large-scale SSR use requires protocol optimization. The present work aimed to identify SSR markers, developed for pear and other fruit species that are effective in characterizing pear germplasm collections and in demonstrating their use in providing support for genetic breeding programs. From a total of 62 SSR markers investigated, 23 yielding reproducible and polymorphic patterns were used to genotype a sample of 42 pear accessions of the Brazilian Pear Germplasm Bank (PGB). When compared to these 23 SSR markers, a subset of eleven markers, selected based on He, PIC and PId, was used to distinguish individual accessions and perform cluster analysis with similar efficacy. Genetic diversity analysis clustered the European, Japanese and Chinese accessions in distinct groups. This markers subset constitutes a valuable tool for several applications related to pear genetic resources management and breeding.
The Draft Genome Sequence of European Pear (Pyrus communis L. ‘Bartlett’)  [PDF]
David Chagné, Ross N. Crowhurst, Massimo Pindo, Amali Thrimawithana, Cecilia Deng, Hilary Ireland, Mark Fiers, Helge Dzierzon, Alessandro Cestaro, Paolo Fontana, Luca Bianco, Ashley Lu, Roy Storey, Mareike Kn?bel, Munazza Saeed, Sara Montanari, Yoon Kyeong Kim, Daniela Nicolini, Simone Larger, Erika Stefani, Andrew C. Allan, Judith Bowen, Isaac Harvey, Jason Johnston, Mickael Malnoy, Michela Troggio, Laure Perchepied, Greg Sawyer, Claudia Wiedow, Kyungho Won, Roberto Viola, Roger P. Hellens, Lester Brewer, Vincent G. M. Bus, Robert J. Schaffer, Susan E. Gardiner, Riccardo Velasco
PLOS ONE , 2014, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0092644
Abstract: We present a draft assembly of the genome of European pear (Pyrus communis) ‘Bartlett’. Our assembly was developed employing second generation sequencing technology (Roche 454), from single-end, 2 kb, and 7 kb insert paired-end reads using Newbler (version 2.7). It contains 142,083 scaffolds greater than 499 bases (maximum scaffold length of 1.2 Mb) and covers a total of 577.3 Mb, representing most of the expected 600 Mb Pyrus genome. A total of 829,823 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were detected using re-sequencing of ‘Louise Bonne de Jersey’ and ‘Old Home’. A total of 2,279 genetically mapped SNP markers anchor 171 Mb of the assembled genome. Ab initio gene prediction combined with prediction based on homology searching detected 43,419 putative gene models. Of these, 1219 proteins (556 clusters) are unique to European pear compared to 12 other sequenced plant genomes. Analysis of the expansin gene family provided an example of the quality of the gene prediction and an insight into the relationships among one class of cell wall related genes that control fruit softening in both European pear and apple (Malus×domestica). The ‘Bartlett’ genome assembly v1.0 (http://www.rosaceae.org/species/pyrus/py?rus_communis/genome_v1.0) is an invaluable tool for identifying the genetic control of key horticultural traits in pear and will enable the wide application of marker-assisted and genomic selection that will enhance the speed and efficiency of pear cultivar development.
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