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Neonatal Complications Related with Prolonged Rupture of Membranes  [PDF]
Hassan Boskabadi,Gholamali Maamouri,Shahin Mafinejad
Macedonian Journal of Medical Sciences , 2011,
Abstract: Background. Prolonged rupture of membranes (PROM) is a common and significant cause of preterm labor and has a major impact on neonatal morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to determine maternal risk factors and the prevalence rate of neonatal complications following PROM . This study also detected the role of maternal antimicrobial treatment on neonatal complications.Methods: This cross-sectional study was performed at Ghaem hospital, Mashhad, Iran; from March 2008 to April 2010 to evaluate newborns’ outcome that were born from mothers with prolonged premature rupture of membranes (PROM> 18 hours). Maternal risk factors, antibiotic administration and its influences on neonatal complications were evaluated. Eligible infants were categorized into group I (symptomatic infants), II (mother with chorioamnionitis) and III (asymptomatic infants).Results. 150 infants were included in the study. 12 (7.7%) infants had definitive infections (meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia), 101(67%) infants were premature and 88(58.6%) infants had mothers with a history of antibiotic intake. Maternal risk factors were reported in the following order: previous PROM (10%), addiction (8%), high urinary tract infection (5/3%), diabetes (4.7%), placenta abruption (4.7%), preeclampsia (3/3%) and cercelage (2%). Neonatal complications related with PROM were prematurity (67.3%), respiratory distress syndrome (22.6%), asphyxia (8.6%), meningitis (5.2%), sepsis (4%), pneumonia (1.3%) and death (4.6%). History of antibiotic administration to mothers with PROM was negative in four babies with sepsis and one with meningitis.Conclusion. The most common complication of PROM was prematurity and its side effects, but infection is the most important modifiable complication. Although antimicrobial treatment of women with a history of PROM improves neonatal outcome through reducing neonatal sepsis and respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), but the incidence rate of meningitis and pneumonia may be increased.
Latency after Preterm Prelabor Rupture of the Membranes: Increased Risk for Periventricular Leukomalacia  [PDF]
Annick Denzler,Tilo Burkhardt,Giancarlo Natalucci,Roland Zimmermann
Journal of Pregnancy , 2014, DOI: 10.1155/2014/874984
Abstract: Objective. To identify the risk factors for cystic periventricular leukomalacia (cPVL) and their implications for deciding between immediate delivery and conservative management of preterm prelabor rupture of the membranes (pPROM). Methods. The following risk factors were compared between cPVL infants and 6440 controls: chorioamnionitis, sex, gestational age (GA), birth weight, pPROM, and pPROM-delivery interval. Factor impact on cPVL risk and clinical decision-making was determined by multivariate logistic regression. Results. Overall cPVL prevalence ( ) was 0.99/1000 births. All cPVL infants but one were born <34 weeks of gestation and were <2500?g; 56% had histological chorioamnionitis versus 1.1% of controls (OR 35.9; 95%-CI 12.6–102.7). Because chorioamnionitis is a postnatal diagnosis, logistic regression was performed with prenatally available factors: pPROM-delivery interval >48 hours (OR 9.0; 95%-CI 4.1–20.0), male gender (OR 3.2; 95%-CI 1.4–7.3). GA was not a risk factor if birth weight was included. Risk decreased with increasing fetal weight despite a prolonged pPROM-delivery interval. Conclusion. pPROM-delivery interval is the single most important prenatally available risk factor for the development of cPVL. Immediate delivery favors babies with chorioamnionitis but disfavors those with non infectious pPROM. In the absence of clinical chorioamnionitis fetal weight gain may offset the inflammatory risk of cPVL caused by a prolonged pPROM-delivery interval. 1. Introduction Cerebral palsy includes a group of nonprogressive movement disorders due to brain lesions or abnormalities in early development [1]. Its prevalence of 2 per 1000 newborns overall rises to 77 per 1000 preterms born at below 28 0/7 weeks of gestation [2, 3]. A major cause is cystic periventricular leukomalacia (cPVL) comprising necrosis and subsequent cyst formation of the periventricular white matter: 60–100% of children with cPVL develop cerebral palsy [4–6]. Although the etiology and pathogenesis of cPVL remain unelucidated, several perinatal risk factors appear involved [7]. Birth asphyxia is no longer assumed the principal culprit [8]. Chorioamnionitis is thought to provoke a fetal inflammatory response syndrome associated with increased fetal cytokines that may lead to neonatal brain injury. Several studies indicate that the cytokines can themselves damage white matter without bacteremia being required [8–15]. An important predictor of chorioamnionitis is preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (pPROM) [16]. One-third of women with pPROM have positive amniotic fluid
Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction?
Pinder RM
International Journal of Wine Research , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S23035
Abstract: Alcohol-attributable cancer: fact or fiction? Editorial (4564) Total Article Views Authors: Pinder RM Published Date July 2011 Volume 2011:3 Pages 21 - 22 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJWR.S23035 Roger M Pinder International Journal of Wine Research, York, UK The International Journal of Wine Research has published a number of articles related to wine and cancer, which have concluded that wine and its polyphenol components may have largely beneficial effects. Thus, a review of the role of wine in cancer concluded that regular and moderate wine consumption was associated with a decreased risk of mortality from certain cancers, and that the risk increased progressively with immoderate consumption.1 Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Roger Pinder Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought Does wine prevent dementia? Editor's choice Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012 Editorial Foreword: International Journal of Wine Research More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Resveratrol comes of age Readers of this article also read: Does wine prevent dementia? Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Amino acid-responsive Crohn's disease: a case study Biodiversity of wine grapes: less than we thought More on the benefits of wine for cognitive decline and dementia Genetic variation in sugar composition among muscadine, Florida hybrid bunch and bunch grape genotypes Reasons for drinking wine and other beverages – comparison across motives in older adults Regulatory and institutional developments in the Ontario wine and grape industry Characterization of esterase activity in the Bianchetta trevigiana grape variety under reducing conditions Editor’s choice: the best of 2011–2012
Editorial
Kieran MW
Clinical Oncology in Adolescents and Young Adults , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COAYA.S20417
Abstract: Editorial Editorial (1388) Total Article Views Authors: Kieran MW Published Date April 2011 Volume 2011:1 Pages 9 - 10 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/COAYA.S20417 Mark Kieran Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA Rapid advances in the molecular characterization of cancer have resulted in new approaches to treatment. For greatest impact, targeted agents, in combination with traditional therapies, will need to be tested in each age group and for each disease. Adolescents and young adults are being recognized as a distinct group of patients that unfortunately are under-represented in formal clinical trials and new treatment assessments. The reason for this are multiple and include the lack of insurance coverage for many as they transition to independence from their parents, the sense of invincibility that many young adults feel, the types of tumors observed in these patients, and the lack of coordinated clinical trial consortiums for this age group. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Readers of this article also read: Role of aliskiren in cardio-renal protection and use in hypertensives with multiple risk factors Berberine: metabolic and cardiovascular effects in preclinical and clinical trials Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Amino acid-responsive Crohn's disease: a case study New treatment options for nonmetastatic osteosarcoma: focus on mifamurtide in adolescents What is a pediatric tumor? Current and emerging treatment options for Peyronie's disease Outpatient chemotherapy, family-centered care, electronic information, and education in adolescents and young adults with osteosarcoma Fixed-dose combinations at the front line of multimodal pain management: perspective of the nurse-prescriber Assessment of psychosocial outcomes in adolescents and young adults with cancer: a systematic review of available instruments
Editorial
Kerwin SM
Reports in Organic Chemistry , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/ROC.S25713
Abstract: Editorial Editorial (2504) Total Article Views Authors: Kerwin SM Published Date September 2011 Volume 2011:1 Pages 1 - 2 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/ROC.S25713 Sean M Kerwin Division of Medicinal Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, University of Texas at Austin, TX, USA I am pleased to announce the launch of Reports in Organic Chemistry - the latest peer reviewed open access journal published by Dovepress. Reports in Organic Chemistry will publish original research reports, reviews, and commentaries in all areas of organic chemistry, broadly defined. This includes combinatorial, bioorganic and medicinal chemistry, supramolecular and materials chemistry, natural products, and carbohydrate chemistry in addition to organic synthesis, reactions, and catalysis. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Readers of this article also read: Performance in L1 and L2 observed in Arabic-Hebrew bilingual aphasic following brain tumor: A case constitutes double dissociation Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite Imaging of peripheral vascular disease Alogliptin: a new addition to the class of DPP-4 inhibitors Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Morgellons disease: Analysis of a population with clinically confirmed microscopic subcutaneous fibers of unknown etiology Neurotransmitter testing of the urine: a comprehensive analysis Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation
Corrigendum
Boyer TD, Medicis JJ, Pappas SC, Potenziano J, Jamil K
Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAJCT.S36089
Abstract: Corrigendum Corrigendum (811) Total Article Views Authors: Boyer TD, Medicis JJ, Pappas SC, Potenziano J, Jamil K Published Date August 2012 Volume 2012:4 Pages 59 - 60 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/OAJCT.S36089 Received: 18 July 2012 Accepted: Published: 13 August 2012 Boyer TD, Medicis JJ, Pappas SC, Potenziano J, Jamil K. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to confirm the reversal of hepatorenal syndrome type 1 with terlipressin: the REVERSE trial design. Open Access Journal of Clinical Trials. 2012;4:39–49. Dr Jamil’s first name was incorrectly spelt as Khuramm Jamil in the author list. The correct spelling is Khurram Jamil. Read the original article Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Khuramm Jamil A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to confirm the reversal of hepatorenal syndrome type 1 with terlipressin: the REVERSE trial design Readers of this article also read: Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite Narcissistic rage: The Achilles’ heel of the patient with chronic physical illness The cognitive basis of diglossia in Arabic: Evidence from a repetition priming study within and between languages Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Morgellons disease: Analysis of a population with clinically confirmed microscopic subcutaneous fibers of unknown etiology Subset-directed antiviral treatment of 142 herpesvirus patients with chronic fatigue syndrome Amino acid management of Parkinson’s disease: a case study Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation Fungus-mediated biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles: potential in detection of liver cancer
Depression in Parkinson’s disease
Rana MA, Hafez K
Journal of Parkinsonism & Restless Legs Syndrome , 2012, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPRLS.S37083
Abstract: Depression in Parkinson’s disease Letter (768) Total Article Views Authors: Rana MA, Hafez K Published Date April 2012 Volume 2012:2 Pages 34 - 35 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JPRLS.S37083 Received: 16 August 2012 Accepted: Published: 17 August 2012 Mohammed A. Rana, Kevin Hafez Parkinson’s Clinic of Eastern Toronto, Toronto, Canada Parkinson's disease (PD) has both motor and non-motor symptoms. There is growing evidence that some of the non-motor symptoms may antedate the motor symptoms and can cause increasing disabling as the disease progresses. Depression is one of the important symptoms of PD.1 About 40 percent of patients with PD may have anhedonia, lack of initiative and assertiveness. The majority of the patients have dysthymia; however, some patients may meet the DSM-IV criteria for major depression. Nonetheless, loss of interest, fatigue, irritability, lack of energy, indecisiveness and sadness are more frequent in PD. Depression may precede the onset of motor symptoms of PD by many years in some cases.2 Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Dr Mohammed A. Rana Postural Hypotension in Parkinson’s disease Readers of this article also read: Methylnaltrexone in the treatment of opioid-induced constipation Potential renovascular hypertension, space missions, and the role of magnesium Tenofovir-associated bone density loss Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Food nanotechnology – an overview Subset-directed antiviral treatment of 142 herpesvirus patients with chronic fatigue syndrome Fructose-enhanced reduction of bacterial growth on nanorough surfaces Enhancing the specificity and efficiency of polymerase chain reaction using polyethyleneimine-based derivatives and hybrid nanocomposites Postural Hypotension in Parkinson’s disease Rituximab for refractory granulomatous eye disease
Erratum
Iancu C, Mocan L
International Journal of Nanomedicine , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S27335
Abstract: Erratum Erratum (3361) Total Article Views Authors: Iancu C, Mocan L Published Date October 2011 Volume 2011:6 Pages 2543 - 2544 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/IJN.S27335 Iancu C, Mocan L. Advances in cancer therapy through the use of carbon nanotube-mediated targeted hyperthermia. International Journal of Nanomedicine. 2011:6 1675–1684. Reference 61 should be: Burke A, Ding X, Singh R, et al. Longterm survival following a single treatment of kidney tumors with multiwalled carbon nanotubes and near-infrared radiation. P Natl Acd Sci USA. 2009;106:12897–12902. Original Article Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Other articles by Professor Cornel Iancu Advances in cancer therapy through the use of carbon nanotube-mediated targeted hyperthermia Enhanced laser thermal ablation for the in vitro treatment of liver cancer by specific delivery of multiwalled carbon nanotubes functionalized with human serum albumin Selective ex-vivo photothermal ablation of human pancreatic cancer with albumin functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes Readers of this article also read: Local anesthetic failure associated with inflammation: verification of the acidosis mechanism and the hypothetic participation of inflammatory peroxynitrite Imaging of peripheral vascular disease Alogliptin: a new addition to the class of DPP-4 inhibitors Current practicality of nanotechnology in dentistry. Part 1: Focus on nanocomposite restoratives and biomimetics Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Epigenomics in cancer management Amino acid management of Parkinson’s disease: a case study Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation Fungus-mediated biological synthesis of gold nanoparticles: potential in detection of liver cancer
A new journal for a new era in neonatology
Robert L Schelonka
Research and Reports in Neonatology , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRN.S17677
Abstract: A new journal for a new era in neonatology Editorial (2735) Total Article Views Authors: Robert L Schelonka Published Date March 2011 Volume 2011:1 Pages 13 - 14 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/RRN.S17677 Robert L Schelonka Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR, USA The specialty of neonatal medicine is young, only about 50 years old by most accounts. Despite its youth, the magnitude and pace of discovery in our field has been dizzying. Little seems more illustrative of this than considering a 1-kg infant who was born in 1960 had a mortality risk of 95%; however, by the year 2000, a 1-kg infant had a 95% chance of surviving.1 This remarkable progress has been fueled by the fact that clinicians and investigators alike have embraced discovery in our field. I recently searched PubMed under the broad topic of “neonate” and received over half a million hits; the search term “preterm infant” yielded 34,000 hits, and the terms “infection in neonates”, a particular research interest of mine, gave 50,000 hits. Given this degree of scholarly activity in our field, one might conclude we have already answered the important questions we face when caring for newborn infants. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Readers of this article also read: Evidence-based decision-making within the context of globalization: A “Why–What–How” for leaders and managers of health care organizations "Globalized public health.” A transdisciplinary comprehensive framework for analyzing contemporary globalization’s influences on the field of public health Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Congenital malformations in Ecuadorian children: urgent need to create a National Registry of Birth Defects Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter lwoffii infection in neonatal intensive care units Evaluation of in-vitro antibiotic susceptibility of different morphological forms of Borrelia burgdorferi Neonatal necrotizing enterocolitis Alternative therapies for respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants Respiratory management of the preterm newborn in the delivery room Current pharmacotherapy in the newborn
Childhood asthma and anthropogenic CO2 emissions
Dosanjh A
Journal of Asthma and Allergy , 2011, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S24565
Abstract: Childhood asthma and anthropogenic CO2 emissions Editorial (3527) Total Article Views Authors: Dosanjh A Published Date October 2011 Volume 2011:4 Pages 103 - 105 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.2147/JAA.S24565 Amrita Dosanjh Pediatric Pulmonologist, San Diego, California, USA Trends in the incidence of childhood asthma worldwide have paralleled the sharp increase in carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, over at least the last two decades. The prevalence of asthma in the United States has quadrupled over the last 20 years in part due to climate-related factors. In a report released by Harvard Medical School and the Center for Health and the Global Environment, it was noted that there was an increase in asthma incidence of 160% from 1980–1994 among preschool children. Post to: Cannotea Citeulike Del.icio.us Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Readers of this article also read: Evidence-based decision-making within the context of globalization: A “Why–What–How” for leaders and managers of health care organizations Role of aliskiren in cardio-renal protection and use in hypertensives with multiple risk factors "Globalized public health.” A transdisciplinary comprehensive framework for analyzing contemporary globalization’s influences on the field of public health Prolonged rupture of membranes in term infants: should all babies be screened? Amino acid management of Parkinson’s disease: a case study Intercellular cancer collisions generate an ejected crystal comet tail effect with fractal interface embryoid body reassembly transformation Successful treatment of reactive airways dysfunction syndrome by high-dose vitamin D PETCO2 measured by a new lightweight mainstream capnometer with very low dead space volume offers accurate and reliable noninvasive estimation of PaCO2 Role of BiPAP applied through endotracheal tube in unconscious patients suffering from acute exacerbation of COPD: a pilot study Enhancement of the dissolution rate and bioavailability of fenofibrate by a melt-adsorption method using supercritical carbon dioxide
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